University of Delaware Library

Shipley–Bringhurst–Hargraves family papers

1660-1978

(bulk dates 1785-1920)


Descriptive Summary

Identification: MSS 684


Title: Shipley–Bringhurst–Hargraves family papers


Inclusive Dates: 1660-1978


Bulk Dates: 1785-1920


Extent: circa 30 linear feet of documents, circa 30 linear feet of photographs, and oversize materials


Abstract: Shipley, Bringhurst, and Hargraves are the family names associated with Rockwood, a Victorian Rural Gothic Revival mansion and estate that was built in north Wilmington, Delaware, between 1851 and 1854. The Hargraves were the last family to privately own Rockwood before its donation to New Castle County in the mid-1970s as a historic house museum and public park. The Shipley-Bringhurst-Hargraves family papers document the personal and professional lives, as well as the ancestry and legacy, of several generations of Delawareans associated with Rockwood.


Language: Materials entirely in English.



Citation

MSS 684, Shipley–Bringhurst–Hargraves family papers, Special Collections, University of Delaware Library, Newark, Delaware.

Shelving Summary

Boxes 1-8 : Shelved in SPEC MSS record center cartons

Box OZ1 : Shelved in SPEC MSS manuscript boxes (1 inch)

Box OZ2 : Shelved in SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches)

Box OZ3: Shelved in SPEC MSS manuscript boxes (1 inch)

Boxes III.1-III.3 : Shelved in SPEC MSS record center cartons

Boxes pb001- pb124 : Shelved in SPEC MSS photo boxes

Boxes M1-M3 : Shelved in SPEC MSS manuscript boxes (3 inch)

Removals: Shelved in SPEC MSS oversize boxes (17 inches)

Removals: Shelved in SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches)

Removals: Shelved in SPEC MSS oversize boxes (20 inches)

Removals: Shelved in SPEC MSS oversize mapcases

Location

Special Collections, University of Delaware Library / Newark, Delaware 19717-5267 / Phone: 302-831-2229 / Fax: 302-831-6003 / URL: http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/

Source

Gift of New Castle County, 2009.

Processing

Processing generously supported by the Friends of Rockwood, 2014.

Processing and encoding by Dustin Frohlich, July 2014 - February 2015.

Earlier processing begun by Matthew O. Davis (2009-2011) and Amanda Daddona (2009-2011).


Portions of this collection are currently in process. As reflected in this finding aid, other portions of this collection are completely processed and open for research. For access to material in process and for assistance of any kind, please contact a manuscripts librarian.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Use of materials from this collection beyond the exceptions provided for in the Fair Use and Educational Use clauses of the U.S. Copyright Law may violate federal law. Permission to publish or reproduce is required from the copyright holder. Please contact Special Collections, University of Delaware Library, http://www.lib.udel.edu/cgi-bin/askspec.cgi


Biographical Notes

Shipley, Bringhurst, and Hargraves are the family names associated with Rockwood, a Victorian Rural Gothic Revival mansion and estate that was built in north Wilmington, Delaware, between 1851 and 1854. The Hargraves were the last family to privately own Rockwood before its donation to New Castle County in the mid-1970s as a historic house museum and public park.

Joseph Shipley (1795-1867)

The builder of Rockwood was Joseph Shipley (1795-1867), a descendant of prominent Quakers and early founders of Willingtown (later Wilmington) who made his fortune in transatlantic merchant banking out of Liverpool, England.

Joseph Shipley was the ninth of ten surviving children born to Joseph Shipley (1752-1832) and Mary Levis (d. 1843). (For clarification, the two Joseph Shipleys are referred to as "Jr." and "Sr." throughout this collection description.) Joseph Shipley, Sr., inherited the Brandywine mill property of his father, Thomas Shipley (1718-1789), and prospered in that business. Joseph Shipley, Jr., was sent to Westtown School and began work in the Philadelphia firm of his cousin, Samuel Canby.

Joseph Shipley worked for Philadelphia merchant James Welsh by 1819, traveling south into Virginia and North Carolina to buy notes from banks for Welsh's firm. He sailed to Liverpool on October 20, 1819, for what was supposed to have been a short trip on behalf of Welsh. The lucrative transatlantic trade kept him in Liverpool for the next thirty years, and he returned to America only three times (in 1826, 1841, and 1847), before his retirement in 1850.

Shipley headed a firm called Shipley, Welsh, and Co., in 1822, bearing responsibility for all of Welsh's cargoes that were sent to Liverpool. In 1825, he joined in a limited partnership with the firm of William and James Brown and Co., and also continued to conduct business as Shipley, Welsh, and Co. These businesses thrived on shipment of American cotton for the Lancashire mills, but also profited as merchant bankers, granting credits and buying and selling foreign exchange. Transatlantic financial and business crises of 1837 strongly affected Shipley's personal finances, but in reward for his services during the crises, he was made a participating partner in all four of the Brown houses of business. The name of the English house was changed to Brown, Shipley & Co., which is still in operation as a private British bank.

Joseph Shipley, Jr., lived in Liverpool from 1819 until 1850 or 1851, when he retired from his career and returned to the Brandywine area to complete the building of Rockwood. Rockwood was designed by English architect George Monier Williams and the mansion was inspired by Shipley's Gothic/Italianate home, Wyncote, located in the village of Allerton, near Liverpool. Joseph Shipley reportedly visited the site of land that he would acquire for Rockwood when he visited Delaware in 1847. Shipley corresponded frequently with his brother Samuel Shipley, as well as with his nephew Thomas S. Newlin, both of whom helped manage affairs in Delaware and conducted numerous land acquisitions toward formation of the Rockwood estate. Shipley’s nephew Edward Bringhurst, Sr., supervised building negotiations and contracts in his uncle's absence.

Upon his return to Delaware, Joseph Shipley became known for the horticultural development of his estate. He was elected second vice-president of the Delaware Horticultural Society and Rockwood was cited by Andrew Jackson Browning in A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening(1859). Shipley died in 1867 but his will allowed for his sisters Sarah and Hannah to remain as residents of Rockwood until their deaths. Hannah Shipley died in 1891.

Pre-Rockwood era Bringhurst family

The Pre-Rockwood era Bringhursts comprise the ancestors of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna James Webb Bringhurst and their descendants, the later generations who acquired the Rockwood mansion from the estate of Joseph Shipley and lived there continuously from 1892 until the property was donated to New Castle County in the mid-1970s. Primary amongst these early ancestors were Dr. Joseph Bringhurst (1767-1834) and his wife Deborah Ferris Bringhurst (1773-1844), both of whom were prominent in religious, social, intellectual, and political circles throughout their lives. Papers related to the Pre-Rockwood era Bringhursts provide rich documentation of Quaker families active in the post-Revolutionary, early Federal period of American history in Wilmington, Delaware, and Philadelphia.

Rockwood-era Bringhurst family

The Bringhurst family moved into Rockwood in 1892 after the death of Hannah Shipley, the last surviving sister of Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867). Joseph's will allowed his sisters to live in Rockwood until their deaths, but provided that when the last sister died the estate would be liquidated and all proceeds would be divided equally amongst his nieces and nephews (Shipley never married and had no children). Sarah Shipley Bringhurst (1812-1896), niece of Joseph Shipley, Jr., and mother of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) was able to use her share of the estate proceeds to purchase the Rockwood house, property, and many of the furnishings for her son at auction.

The two generations of Bringhurst family members who lived in the Rockwood estate are those of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) and his wife Anna James Webb (1843-1923), and those of their four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (1874-1947), and Edward Bringhurst III (1884-1939).

Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912)

Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) was the great nephew of Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867). He was a pharmacist and Wilmington businessman who served as director of the Wilmington Savings Fund Society, president of the New Castle County Fire Insurance Company, president of the Wilmington and Great Valley Turnpike Co, director of several railroad companies, and a member of the Delaware Historical Society. He was also a practicing Quaker and a member of the Wilmington Friends Meeting.

Edward Bringhurst, Jr., married Anna James Webb (1843-1923), the daughter of another prominent local Quaker family, on April 22, 1862. Anna and Edward had four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst (born 1863), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (born 1865), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (born 1874), and Edward Bringhurst III (born 1884). In 1892, Edward Bringhurst Jr. purchased the Rockwood house, property, and much of the furnishings from the estate of Joseph Shipley with the financial help of his mother, Sarah Shipley Bringhurst (a beneficiary of Joseph Shipley), and moved his family there shortly after. Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and his wife are buried next to each other in the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery in Wilmington, Delaware.

Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1923)

Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1923) was the wife of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912), who she married on April 22, 1862. She and Edward were both Quakers who attended the Wilmington Friends Meeting. Anna and Edward had four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst (born 1863), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (born 1865), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (born 1874), and Edward Bringhurst III (born 1884).

Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith(1863-1932)

Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932) was the daughter of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. Born in Wilmington, Delaware in 1863, she was commonly referred to as “Bessie” in family papers and correspondence. Bessie married the widower John Galt-Smith (d. 1899), a linen merchant twenty years her senior, on June 1, 1886. Galt-Smith had two children from his previous marriage. The couple split their time between living in New York City and Ireland, generally spending June to August in Ireland and the rest of the year in America.

In Ireland the Galt-Smiths first lived in "Meadowbank," a house in a suburb north of Belfast. In 1891, John Galt Smith signed a 30-year lease on Kilwaughter Castle, ancestral home of the Galt family, in Larne, Ireland. After her husband died in 1899, Bessie continued to live at Kilwaughter during the summer and in America in the winter.

Bessie traveled to Ireland in June of 1914 and became stranded due to the onset of hostilities leading to World War I. She was unable to book safe passage back to America until 1919. After the end of World War I, the deteriorating security situation caused by the escalating Irish Civil War prompted Bessie to vacate Kilwaughter. Many possessions were removed with her back to America, and the rest were sold at auction. Bessie moved back to Delaware in 1922 and lived at Rockwood for the remainder of her life, where she and her sister Mary entertained guests with extensive dinner parties. “Bessie” Bringhurst and John Galt-Smith are buried next to each other at the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery.

Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965)

Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965) was the second child of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912). She never married, and lived in Rockwood from when her grandmother and her father bought the estate until her death, at which point she willed Rockwood to her niece, Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972). Near the end of her life, Mary Thomas Bringhurst made clear to her niece her “primary desire to preserve the beauty of Rockwood,” both mansion and estate, even if accomplished by a, “transfer to a public or private body politic or institution.”

Mary’s life spanned a century from the end of the Civil War until the era of the Civil Rights Movement. It is largely due to her role as keeper of the family home and heritage that the Rockwood house museum with is trove of furnishings and the archive of Shipley, Bringhurst and Hargraves papers exist today. Mary instilled a love of the Rockwood property and family history in her favored niece, Nancy, who with her husband Gordon Hargraves preserved the Rockwood legacy.

Edith Ferris Bringhurst (1874-1947)

Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers (1874-1947) was the third daughter of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and the only one to have children. She married Alexander Sellers in 1897 in a wedding at Rockwood, and lived with her husband in Radnor, Pennsylvania. They had four children: Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972), William Sellers (1899-1995), Alexander Sellers, Jr. (1901-1970), and Edith Claypoole Sellers Farnum (1910-1999). Daughter Nancy inherited Rockwood from her aunt, Edith's sister Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965).

Edward Bringhurst III/V (1884-1939)

Edward Bringhurst III/V (1884-1939) was the youngest child of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) and Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1912). Although his given appellation was Edward III (the third), after a trip to Europe in 1896 he unilaterally and without explanation changed it to Edward V (the fifth).

Edward III/V was educated at home and traveled extensively during his childhood and youth. Notable trips included visits to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, as well as to Washington, D.C., and many trips to Europe with his sister Elizabeth Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932) as well as other family members.

As an adult, he managed the Rockwood estate and the family's financial investments. Edward III/V was a connoisseur of fine furniture and antiques, as well as an accomplished dog breeder and aviation hobbyist. He was also a successful amateur photographer who exhibited at the Wilmington Salon 1934 and 1935.

Edward spent much of his life in ill health (further exacerbated by an aviation accident), and died at the relatively young age of fifty-five. He is buried with his family at the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery in Wilmington, Delaware.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972)

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972) and her husband Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983) were the last private owners of Rockwood. Nancy, daughter of Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers and Alexander Sellers, was the favored niece of Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), last surviving sibling of the Bringhurst children who lived at Rockwood. Nancy and her husband, Gordon Hargraves, provided great support to Mary Bringhurst, who during her lifetime expressed increasing concern for the preservation of the Rockwood home and property. Though Nancy and Gordon visited “Sister Mary” frequently at Rockwood, they made their home in at "Meadowbrook," in nearby Radnor, Pennsylvania.

Sources:

Leach, Josiah Granville. History of the Bringhurst Family; with Notes on the Clarkson, De Peyster and Boude Families. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1901.

Mickey, Thomas J. America's Romance with the English Garden. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2013.

Additional information derived from the collection and research notes compiled by the Friends of Rockwood.

Other bibliographic materials derived from collection.


Scope and Content Note

The Shipley–Bringhurst–Hargraves family papers document the personal and professional lives, as well as the ancestry and legacy, of several generations of Delawareans associated with Rockwood, a Victorian Gothic Revival mansion and estate in north Wilmington built in 1851 by Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867).The bulk of the materials in the collection were created by two generations of the Edward Bringhurst, Jr., family, the longest and most prolific inhabitants of the estate. The longevity and commitment of Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), an unmarried woman dedicated to preserving her family’s history and the Rockwood estate, accounts for the vast and extraordinarily rich documentation that comprises this multi-generational collection. Spanning dates from the late 17th century to 1978, the collection reflects the personal and professional lives of the prosperous, erudite, and worldly Delaware families tied to Rockwood. The collection relates intrinsically to the history of Delaware, particularly in the greater-Wilmington area: early Shipley and Bringhurst family members were prominent Quakers and fundamental in the shaping of religious, social, business, and political life in Wilmington, and their descendants continued to play important roles in the region.

The collection centers on intergenerational life at Rockwood, the Victorian Gothic Revival estate that was modeled after Wyncote, Joseph Shipley’s home in Allerton near Liverpool, England. Early Shipley documents include correspondence with architects A & G Williams, estimates, invoices, and receipts for construction, and the working architectural drawings of the Rockwood manor house and outbuildings. Horticultural bills from New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey nurseries reveal Shipley’s planning of Rockwood grounds in the contemporary Gardenesque style. Rockwood was later expanded by the Edward Bringhurst family who inhabited Rockwood for two generations.

The Bringhurst correspondence, photographs, sheet music, silhouettes, and other materials of this era, bulk dates 1892-1922, are most indicative of daily life at Rockwood. The collection further reveals the twentieth-century work of Nancy Sellers and her husband Gordon Hargraves, whose efforts toward preserving Rockwood in the vision of Mary T. Bringhurst are demonstrated through correspondence, estate inventories, family heirloom catalogues, and preservation plans.

The materials in the collection include many intergenerational commonalities but also exhibit keen interest by the latter generations towards their ancestry. The desire to learn about, collect, and preserve familial heritage and values is displayed particularly throughout the Bringhurst and Hargraves family papers.

The Shipley–Bringhurst–Hargraves family papers is organized into five subgroups. The first three subgroups reflect the provenance of the papers by association with the primary families represented in the collection: I. Shipley family papers, II. Bringhurst family papers, III. Hargraves family papers.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is further divided as II.A. Pre-Rockwood era Bringhursts (those who never lived at the mansion but whose descendants did) and II.B. Rockwood-era Bringhursts (those who lived in the mansion after 1892).

The remaining subgroups in the collection comprise material that is multi-format and highly intergenerational: IV. Photographs, albums, sheet music, magazines and objects, and V. Family genealogy. This introductory scope note explains the overall arrangement and content for the collection. Detailed scope and content notes for each series precede corresponding container lists in this finding aid.

The collection spans the dates 1692-1978 and comprises more than 60 linear feet of documents and photographs with extensive oversize materials. Subgroups I. Shipley family papers, and III. Hargraves family papers, and Series IV.B. Sheet music are currently processed with detailed descriptions provided in the container list available in this finding aid.

The remaining extent of the collection is currently in process. This online finding aid will be updated frequently as subgroups and series in the collection are completed. This finding aid should be considered a work in progress with emerging description details at the subgroup and series levels for areas of the collection that remain in process. For the parts of the collection that are still in progress, working descriptions at the series level are provided here. For assistance of any kind, please contact a manuscripts librarian at the University of Delaware Library.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names
Shipley, Joseph, 1795-1867.
Bringhurst, Joseph.
Bringhurst, Deborah, 1773-1844.
Bringhurst, Mary Dickinson, 1806-1886.
Bringhurst, Edward, 1809-1884.
Bringhurst, Sarah Shipley, 1812-1896.
Bringhurst, Edward, 1835-1912.
Bringhurst, Anna James Webb, 1843-1923.
Galt-Smith, Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst, 1863-1932.
Bringhurst, Mary Thomas, 1865-1965.
Bringhurst, Edith Ferris, 1874-1947.
Bringhurst, Edward, 1884-1939.
Hargraves, Nancy Sellers, 1898-1972.
Hargraves, Gordon Sweat, 1898-1983.
Shipley, Thomas, 1718-1789.
Shipley, Joseph, 1752-1832.
Welsh, John, 1770-1854.
Shipley, Samuel, 1777-1848.
Jefferis, James, 1758-1822.
Bringhurst, Thomas, 1621-
Bringhurst, John, active 1680-1685.
Bringhurst, John, 1691-1750.
Bringhurst, John, 1722-1789.
Bringhurst, Joseph, 1732/33-1811.
Bringhurst, James, -1810
Bringhurst, Anna Pole, -1777.
Dickinson, John, 1732-1808.
Sellers, Edith Claypoole, 1910-1998.
Sellers, Alexander, 1875-1957.
Broom, Jacob, 1752-1810.
Rodney, Caesar, 1728-1784.
Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965.
Brown, Charles Brockden, 1771-1810.
Rowan, Archibald Hamilton, 1751-1834.
Pole, Thomas, 1753-1829.
Fulton, Robert, 1765-1815.
Ferris, Benjamin, 1780-1867.
Corporate Names
Rockwood Museum (New Castle County, Del.)
Brown, Shipley & Co.
Society for the Attainment of Useful Knowledge.
Topical Terms
Rockwood Museum (New Castle County, Del.)
Gothic revival (Architecture)--Delaware--New Castle County.
Society of Friends.
Quakers.
Quaker women.
Quaker women--History--18th century.
Abolitionists.
United States--History--1783-1865.
Geographic Names
Christiana Hundred (Del.)--History--18th century.
Christiana Hundred (Del.)--History--19th century.
Brandywine Hundred (Del.)--History--18th century.
Brandywine Hundred (Del.)--History--19th century.
Brandywine Hundred (Del.)--History--20th century.
Form/Genre Terms
Correspondence.
Deeds.
Financial records.
Architectural drawings (visual works)
Building plans.
Land surveys.
Wills.
Estate records.
Estate inventories.
Passports.
Customs records.
Stock certificates.
Account books.
Engravings (prints)
Printing plates.
Cabinet photographs.
Receipts (financial records)
Sheet music.
Ephemera.
Lithographs.
Cadastral maps.
Tracing cloth.
Negatives (photographic)
Commonplace books.
Watchpapers.
Clippings (information artifacts).
Diaries.
Daybooks.
Marriage certificates.
Genealogical tables.
Property records.
Biographies (documents)
Almanacs.
Broadsides (notices)
Pamphlets.
Occupation
Bankers.
Millers.
Pharmacists.
Diarists.
Draftsmen (artists)
Personal Contributors
Shipley, Joseph, 1795-1867.
Hargraves, Nancy Sellers, 1898-1972.
Hargraves, Gordon Sweat, 1898-1983.
Shipley, Thomas, 1718-1789.
Shipley, Joseph, 1752-1832.
Shipley, Samuel, 1777-1848.
Price, Eli K. (Eli Kirk), 1797-1884.
Rowan, Archibald Hamilton, 1751-1834.
Bringhurst, Joseph.
Bringhurst, Deborah, 1773-1844.
Dickinson, John, 1732-1808.
Bringhurst, James, -1810
Ferris, Benjamin, 1780-1867.
Brown, Charles Brockden, 1771-1810.
Bringhurst, Sarah Shipley, 1812-1896.
Bringhurst, Edward, 1809-1884.
Additional Title
Rockwood archives.

Related Materials in this Repository

MSS 675 Friends of Rockwood records


  • I. Shipley family papers
    • I.A. Joseph Shipley, Jr., business records
    • I.B. Joseph Shipley, Jr., correspondence and personal papers
    • I.C. Material related to the planning and building of Rockwood
    • I.D. Joseph Shipley, Jr., financial records
    • I.E. Legal and real estate affairs of Joseph Shipley, Jr.
    • I.F. Legal records and personal papers of other Shipley relatives
  • II. Bringhurst family papers
    • II.A. Pre-Rockwood Bringhursts
    • II.B. Rockwood-era Bringhursts
  • III. Hargraves family papers
    • III.A. Sellers family members
    • III.B. Nancy Sellers Hargraves and Gordon Sweat Hargraves papers
    • III.C. Gordon Hargraves personal, financial, and legal correspondence
    • III.D. Rockwood personal properties and cultural heritage
    • III.E. Wills, estate, and legal documents
    • III.F. Legal and real estate
  • IV. Photographs, albums, sheet music, magazines, and objects
    • IV.A. Photographs
    • IV.B. Sheet music
  • V. Rockwood Museum and collection related materials
  • VI. Family genealogies

Detailed Description of the Collection

Subgroup I. Shipley family papers , 1735-1895

The cornerstone of the Shipley family papers is Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867), the builder of Rockwood and descendant of a prominent Quaker family whose members were also early founders of Willingtown (later Wilmington, Delaware). He was the ninth of ten surviving children born to Joseph Shipley (1752-1832) and Mary Levis (d. 1843). (For clarification, the two Joseph Shipleys are referred to as "Jr." and "Sr." throughout this collection description.) Joseph Shipley, Sr., inherited the Brandywine mill property of his father, Thomas Shipley (1718-1789), and prospered in that business. Joseph Shipley, Jr., was sent to Westtown school and began work in the Philadelphia firm of his cousin, Samuel Canby.

The bulk of Subgroup I. contains three series of legal and financial records, as well as personal correspondence to and from Joseph Shipley, Jr., related to his various business and banking interests in Liverpool, New York, and Philadelphia. Joseph Shipley, Jr., lived in Liverpool from 1819 until 1851, when he retired from his career and returned to the Brandywine area to build Rockwood.

Series I.C. contains correspondence, financial records, and architectural plans related to the building of Rockwood, which was designed by English architect George Williams and inspired by Shipley's Gothic/Italianate home near Liverpool, Wyncote. Series I. D. contains Shipley's financial records that include bills, check summaries, and corporate stocks. The financial documents originate from both England and America.

Series I. E. contains the legal and real estate affairs of Joseph Shipley, Jr. including legal documents and correspondence related to Shipley's travel, mortgages, and estate. The series also includes over sixty deeds for Shipley's properties in Brandywine Hundred; Christiana Hundred (Wilmington); Randolph County, Virginia; and Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Series I.F. contains a small amount of material related to other Shipley family relatives (described in relation to Joseph Shipley, Jr.): Alexander Hamilton Shipley; Joseph's grandfather Thomas Shipley (1718-1789); father Joseph Shipley, Sr. (1752-1832); brother Samuel Shipley (1777-1848); nephew Thomas Shipley (1805-1864); nephew Samuel H. Shipley (1809-1814); brother John Shipley (1782-1863); and brother Samuel's wife and in-laws, Elizabeth Jefferis and Jefferis family members.

Series I.A. Joseph Shipley, Jr., business records , 1816-1965

This series includes business records of Joseph Shipley, Jr., in account with partnerships in Liverpool and Philadelphia. It includes receipts, accounts, ledgers, documents, and correspondence. Joseph Shipley, Jr., worked for Philadelphia merchant James Welsh by 1819, traveling south to buy notes from banks for Welsh's firm. He sailed to Liverpool on October 20, 1819, for what was supposed to have been a short trip on behalf of Welsh. The lucrative transatlantic trade kept him in Liverpool for the next thirty years, and he returned to America only three times (in 1826, 1841, and 1847), before his retirement in 1850.

Shipley headed a firm called Shipley, Welsh, and Co., in 1822, bearing responsibility for all of Welsh's cargoes that were sent to Liverpool. In 1825, he joined in a limited partnership with the firm of William and James Brown and Co., and also continued to conduct business as Shipley, Welsh, and Co. These businesses thrived on shipment of American cotton for the Lancashire mills, but also profited as merchant bankers, granting credits and buying and selling foreign exchange. Transatlantic financial and business crises of 1837 strongly affected Shipley's personal finances, but in reward for his services during the crises, he was made a participating partner in all four of the Brown houses of business. The name of the English house was changed to Brown, Shipley & Co, which is still in operation as a private British bank.

A late file of correspondence in this series dates from 1965 when members of Brown, Shipley and Co. were writing a corporate history and contacted Gordon Hargraves for early Shipley letters.

Joseph Shipley business correspondence , 1816-1867

1816-1823   [Box 1 F1]

1824-1834   [Box 1 F2]

1840-1867   [Box 1 F3]

Joseph Shipley accounts and correspondence with John Welsh , 1819   [Box 1 F4]

Accounts of Shipley's travels to Washington City, Richmond, Fredericksburg, Petersburg, etc., to buy notes for Welsh's firm on "Southern Paper" from Virginia and North and South Carolina banks. Also includes copies of correspondence and record of expenses for his first trip to Liverpool. Correspondence addressed to John Welsh, Director.

Mill account and inventory , 1816-1819   [Box 1 F5]

Folder includes statement of a cotton mill account of expenses and supplies, "taken from one year's work," which includes instructions and distinctions for summer and winter supplies used. Supplies include India cotton, barks of stretching yarns, winder of bobbin, and a steam engine piston. Probably in Joseph Shipley's hand, item was sent "from Liverpool." Folder also includes an 1818 account invoice bearing the name Abigail West Cr., accounting for materials, such as bands of flour, purchased by Joseph Shipley, Jr., [J.S.] Woolston, and Joseph R. Jenks.

Shipley, Welsh and Company bills and documents, Philadelphia , 1818-1832   [Box 1 F6]

Includes invoices for shipments of upland cotton received of the Ship Dido , Captain Mathieu from Savannah, consigned to merchant Joseph Shipley for account of merchant John Welsh, Philadelphia.

Shipley, Welsh and Company customs declarations , 1822-1826

Declarations for goods such as salt, coal, woolen stuffs, bound and unbound books, cotton, wheat flour, tar, nuts, blankets, turpentine, "quercitron bark for dyer's use," flannel, linen, flint glass, leaf tobacco, potatoes, apples, walnuts, sweet potatoes, etc. , for Shipley, Welsh and Co., Philadelphia.

1822 January- 1822 June   [Box 1 F7] (Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

1822 July-1822 December   [Box 1 F8]

1823 January-1823 June   [Box 1 F9]

1823 July-1823 December   [Box 1 F10]

1824 January-1824 June   [Box 1 F11]

1824 July-1824 December   [Box 1 F12]

1825 January-1825 June   [Box 1 F13]

1825 July-1825 December   [Box 1 F14]

1826   [Box 1 F15]

Shipley, Welsh and Company customs return log , 1823-1826   [Box 1 F16]

Shipley, Welsh and Company account books , 1820-1826   [Box 1 F17]

2 volumes of accounts from Liverpool to Shipley, Welsh, in Philadelphia

John Welsh account book , 1825-1826   [Box OZ2 F18] (Housed in SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Account book of John Welsh, including accounts held with Moss Rogers & Moss, Jones & Mann, Thomas and John A. Case, Joseph Shipley Jr., Wistar Liter & Price, Thomas Price, Enos Johnson, and many others. Also lists the interest account, charges account, merchandise account, profit and loss, ships account, and office expenses.

Annual accounts and balance sheets of W. & J. Brown , 1827-1849   [Box 1 F19]

Accounts of offices in Liverpool and New York. Brown Brothers include William Brown, James Brown, Stewart Brown, in limited partnerships with Joseph Shipley.

Joseph Shipley in account with Brown and Bowen, Philadelphia. , 1851-1858   [Box 1 F20]

Joseph Shipley's account book with Brown Brothers, New York , 1853-1861   [Box 1 F21]

Brown Brothers and William and James Brown and Company accounts , 1815-1831   [Box 1 F22]

Baltimore and Liverpool Houses.

Joseph Shipley in account with Brown, Shipley and Company , 1852, 1853, 1861, 1862   [Box 1 F23]

Liverpool

William & James Brown and Co. and Brown, Shipley and Co. letters of credit , 1827-1888   [Box 1 F24]

John Crosby Brown letters to Edward Bringhurst, Jr. , 1907-1908   [Box 1 F25]

Three letters regarding historical record of Joseph Shipley's relationship to S. & J. Welsh and also William and James Brown & Company.

Brown, Shipley and Company in account with Sara Field Evans , 1933, 1938   [Box 1 F26]

Letters, Mrs. Thatcher Brown to Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983) , 1965   [Box 1 F27]

Letters from Brown Brothers Harriman & Co Bankers requesting historical information about Joseph Shipley.

Undated and incomplete accounts   [Box 1 F28]

Series I.B. Joseph Shipley, Jr., correspondence and personal papers , 1815-1865

This series includes Joseph Shipley, Jr.'s correspondence, receipts, and various documents of family members associated with the Joseph Shipley, Jr., generation of Shipley relatives. The personal correspondence between Shipley and friends and family was mostly exchanged when Shipley was living in Liverpool, with extensive business news and correspondence mixed in. Family correspondents include sisters Sarah and Hannah Shipley, father Joseph Shipley, Sr., brother Samuel Shipley, brother John Shipley, sister Mary Dixon, niece Mary Anne Dixon, niece Sarah E. Dixon, cousin Thomas Newlin, nephew Thomas S. Newlin, nephew Edward Bringhurst, nephew Ferris Bringhurst, kinsman James Canby, cousin Elizabeth Thompson. Friends and business associates include (but are not limited to) Thomas Yardley, Edward Sawyer, Davis Stacey, Richard Price, Elnathan Smith, John Hicks, James Hagarty, William Brown, James Brown, A. C. Bayard, Edward Rushton, John Jerdain, and others. With transatlantic correspondence, there is frequent mention of departing ships which transported the letter writer's mail. There are frequent exchanges between Shipley and his brother Samuel, as well as with his nephew Thomas S. Newlin, both of whom helped manage affairs in Delaware. In addition to Shipley's letters sent home to family members, the series includes some copies of Shipley's outgoing letters from letterpress books.

Joseph Shipley, Jr., correspondence , 1815-1865

1815-1819   [Box 1 F29]

1820   [Box 1 F30]

Includes letter from the Philadelphia Literary Association.

1821   [Box 1 F31]

1822   [Box 1 F32]

1823   [Box 1 F33]

1824   [Box 1 F34]

1825   [Box 1 F35]

1826   [Box 1 F36]

1827 January-1827 June   [Box 1 F37]

1827 July-1827 December   [Box 1 F38]

1828   [Box 1 F39]

1829   [Box 1 F40]

1830   [Box 2 F41]

1831   [Box 2 F42]

1832   [Box 2 F43]

1833   [Box 2 F44]

1834   [Box 2 F45]

1835   [Box 2 F46]

1836   [Box 2 F47]

1837   [Box 2 F48]

Includes a letter from Joseph Shipley to his brother Samuel, April 25, 1837, written on a page of a mechanically printed letter from W & J Brown & Co. to clients about the financial crisis in trade. The firm's letter describes the market for American cotton, foreign grain, turpentine, flaxseed, and tobacco, but Shipley reassured his brother, "We hope & believe that the worst is now over ... "

1838   [Box 2 F49]

1839   [Box 2 F50]

Includes a statement and total amount of the growth, export, consumption, etc. of the cotton crop of the United States for the year ending 30th September 1839.

1840   [Box 2 F51]

Includes a letter from Joseph Shipley to his brother Samuel, September 11, 1840, written on a page of a mechanically printed letter from Brown, Shipley & Co. to clients about the status of the cotton market and other trades in wheat, flour, and turpentine.

1841   [Box 2 F52]

1842   [Box 2 F53]

Includes a mechanically reproduced circular from Brown, Shipley & Co. to clients, 19th September 1842, regarding the ongoing commercial difficulties.

1843   [Box 2 F54]

1844   [Box 2 F55]

1845   [Box 2 F56]

1846   [Box 2 F57]

Includes a printed appeal to the people of Delaware soliciting funds to build a monument for the officers and soldiers of Delaware who participated in the "great cause of American Independence."

1848   [Box 2 F58]

1849   [Box 2 F59]

Includes a news column from the American and Gazette on President James K. Polk, who died June 15, 1849. Also includes a telegram, September 14, notifying Edward Bringhurst of Joseph Shipley's arrival in Philadelphia.

1850-1854   [Box 2 F60]

1855-1859   [Box 2 F61]

Includes letters from Cpt. Samuel F. Du Pont (and Mrs. Cpt. Du Pont) . Also includes news column of a list of trees "Important to Farmers."

1860-1861   [Box 2 F62]

Includes a letter from Philadelphia bookseller Willis Hazard to Joseph Shipley, 24 April 1860, regarding shipment of books. Also includes correspondence regarding several philanthropical and charitable donations. Includes a letter of appreciation for supporting the 2d Regiment of Delaware Volunteers from Anna Brinckle and another from Maj. Gen. Henry Du Pont regarding support for the 1st Delaware Regiment. Includes an exchange with Maj. Genl. Henry Du Pont. Also includes two letters from Capt. Jon. P. Gilles, U.S. Steam Sloop Seminole , regarding action in Hampton Roads and Hilton Head, October and November, 1861.

1862-1865   [Box 2 F63]

Includes letters from Capt. Jon. P. Gilles, U.S. Steam Sloop Seminole , and Adm. Samuel F. Du Pont.

Hamilton Rowan letters to Joseph Shipley , 1822, 1824   [Box 2 F64]

Two letters from Irishman Archibald Hamilton Rowan, 1822 and 1824, Dublin, to Joseph Shipley, Liverpool. In the first, he wrote "Mr. Hamilton Rowan has been induced by Mr. Parsons saying he would request his friend Joseph Shipley to forward any parcell he might have to convey to his friend Caesar Rodney ... he leaves the parcel open its contents are some copies of a lithographic production similar to what he sends with this requesting Mr. Shipley's acceptance of it." The letter (with envelope) includes a lithograph portrait and a lithograph broadside with portrait of Constantine Canarios (Constantine Kanaris, c. 1795-1877, Aegean freedom fighter, pirate, privateer, merchantman, and later prime minister of Greece).

The 1824 letter: "Mr. Hamilton Rowan presents his compliments to Mr. Shipley and takes the liberty of sending to his care the accompanying parcel for Mr. John Hamilton of the Delaware ... If the enclosed prints are worthy your accpetance it must be from the characters of the two persons & the circumstances attending the third." There are two lithographs, possibly included in this 1824 packet. The first: "Device on a snuff box presented to Capt.. G.W.R. Hamilton, C.B.H.M.S. Cambrian by the father of a family which he rescued from an Algerian Frigate in 1822, after the sack of Scio. / Copied on Stone by J. Conolly. Printed by MH & J. W. Allen, Dublin." The second: "Robert Owen, a sketch by J. Comerford, taken at the request of A.H.R." There is also a one-page poem, "By a Sister on the Reappointment of her Brother to his command in the Mediterranean, 1824" by "F. H. Rowan, Dublin."

Hamilton Rowan, a founding member of The Dublin Society of United Irishmen, lived for a time in Delaware, where he operated a calico mill and enjoyed the company of William Poole, John Dickinson, and Caesar Rodney. Robert Owen managed a mill in New Lanark, Scotland, and led social reform, bringing utopian socialism and the cooperative movement to New Harmony, Indiana. Additional item removed for cataloging with imprints in Special Collections: Memorials written in America, 1798, Addressed to his Children by Archibald Hamilton Rowan / Revised in Dublin, 1822. Lithographed bound booklet, with lithographed portrait of Rowan "drawn from nature on stone by J. Comerford, Dublin, 1822" and autograph inscription: "Joseph Shipley Jnr - presented by Archibald Hamilton Rowan Esq.,, 11 Jan 1822."

Miscellaneous letters and documents addressed to Joseph Shipley , 1820-1840   [Box 2 F65]

Miscellaneous letters addressed to Joseph Shipley , undated   [Box 2 F66]

Includes several letters from Mrs. Cooper addressed to Joseph Shipley, Liverpool, seeking funds in support of her son, James Cooper. Also includes an undated letter to Samuel F. Du Pont.

Memberships, social, and personal ephemera , 1821-1854   [Box 2 F67]

Items from America and England, ranging from a wine list, game certificate, 1846 invitation to the opening of the Royal Albert Dock & Warehouse, membership in the Wilmington Library Company, and a silhouette of Joseph Shipley of Brown, Shipley, and Co.

Portraits (1 of 2) , circa 1840, circa 1870   [Box OZ1 F68]

Engravings of Joseph Shipley, Jr. Includes note in the hand of Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst regarding the portrait: "You spoke of Mr. Shipley- You can see his picture in that old album from home- I think he has close side whiskers and very sedate." Also includes cabinet card photograph of Joseph Shipley, Jr. produced by J. Paul Brown, 617 Market Street, Wilmington, Delaware, circa 1870. The original daguerreotype was taken in 1855.

Portraits (2 of 2) , circa 1840   [Box OZ1 F68a]

Steel printing plate containing portrait of Joseph Shipley Jr. used to create engravings.

Series I.C. Material related to the planning and building of Rockwood , 1850-1856

Joseph Shipley, Jr., reportedly visited the site of land that he would acquire for Rockwood when he visited Delaware in 1847. He purchased an 80-acre farm from Thomas B. Harker in 1850, "Mansion Farm" from Levi Weldin in 1851, 13 acres from Peter Phillips in 1851, and another 20 acres from John Beeson in 1852. The folders here contain letters from Edward Bringhurst, Shipley's nephew (by marriage to his brother Samuel's daughter, Sarah Shipley Bringhurst), who supervised building negotiations and contracts in his uncle's absence, and also from George Williams of Liverpool (b. 1815), who was the architect for Rockwood. George Monier Williams and Arthur Williams were the architects of Wyncote, the home Joseph Shipley leased in Allerton, a village near Liverpool, in 1846. Joseph Shipley returned to Delaware in 1851, at which time construction on Rockwood began. Elisha Huxley, a carpenter from Wilmington, was the general contractor for Rockwood. This series includes correspondence, receipts toward labor and furnishings, and oversize architectural drawings for both houses in Allerton (England) and Rockwood (Delaware).

Correspondence related to Rockwood , 1850 January -1850 June   [Box 2 F69]

Includes a floor plan, "proposed front view facing north," and "copy of Huxley's estimate" for building the house.

Correspondence related to Rockwood , 1850 July-1850 December   [Box 2 F70]

Includes a rough map of the property.

Correspondence related to Rockwood , 1851-1856   [Box 2 F71]

Includes correspondence from George Williams with construction details.

Plans, receipts, and estimates for building Rockwood , 1850   [Box 2 F72]

Includes receipts from Elisha Huxley and a plot plan for the proposed site of the house with original land owners, among other items.

Purchase lists, receipts for furnishings and details , 1846, 1851-1856   [Box 2 F73]

Includes 2 invoices for furnishings supplied by Gillow & Co., Lancaster, 1846, possibly for Wyncote, Shipley's home near Liverpool. Also includes receipts from Philadelphia and Wilmington merchants.

Horticultural bills , 1852-1859   [Box 2 F74]

Arthur and George Monier Williams drawings with property map of Allerton, near Liverpool , 1840   [Box 2 F75] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Plan of land at Allerton (England) belonging to W. Reynolds, Esq., M.D., and details of porch and door into garden, by A and G Williams, architects, 1840. Property map showing outline of house and property lines of adjoining owners Mrs. Hobson and S.J. Clegg, with directions reading From Garston, From Allerton Hall, and Towards Liverpool.

Map of New Castle County , 1849   [Box 2 F76] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Map of New Castle County, Delaware, from original surveys, Samuel M. Rea and Jacob Price. Philadelphia: Smith and Wistar, 1849. Reproduction.

Unidentified foundation , undated   [Box 2 F77] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Contains "Hudson" text and shield watermark.

Architectural details for Rockwood , 1851   [Box 2 F78] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Details of windows, conservatory, barge board to the entrance, etc. by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq. *Tape touching document.

Porch and side elevation , 1851   [Box 2 F79] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq.

Elevation toward garden , 1851   [Box 2 F80] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq. Also includes reproduction and negative.

Ground floor and chamber plans , 1851   [Box 2 F81] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq. Also includes reproductions.

Roof plan , 1851   [Box 2 F82] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawing by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq. Also includes reproduction.

Outbuildings , 1851   [Box 2 F83] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings for scullery/wash house and stables, by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq. Also includes reproduction.

Ice house , circa 1890   [Box 2 F84] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Drawing and specifications for an ice house by unknown architect, circa 1890.

Ground and upper plan and elevation for an addition , 1856   [Box 2 F85] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings by George Williams, architect, Liverpool, for Jos. Shipley, Esq.

Designs for gate keeper's lodge , 1855-1856   [Box 2 F86] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Working drawings by Thomas and James M. Dixon, architects, 117 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, for Joseph Shipley, Esq.

Land survey , undated   [Box 2 F87]

Survey of acreage for property adjacent to "Country Road," Edward Bringhurst's woods, and land of Samuel B. Dixon. On cloth.

Series I.D. Joseph Shipley, Jr., financial records , 1819-1861

Records in this series reflect incidental expenses from life in England and America, ranging from lodging receipts from the Star and Garter in Liverpool, where Shipley resided in 1819-1820, to accounts of farming labor at Rockwood.

Personal finances for Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1819-1861   [Box 2 F88]

Bills addressed to Joseph Shipley, residing at the Star and Garter, Liverpool, 1819-1820. Bills for work done on the farms near Rockwood, spreading lime, ox cart, etc.,, from George Harriet, Brandywine Hundred, 1859-1861.

Summary of checks drawn on the Bank of Delaware , 1851-1859   [Box 2 F89]

Contemporary lists with note: "original checks in collection of Historical Society of Delaware."

Corporate stocks , 1852-1855   [Box 2 F90]

Series I.E. Legal and real estate affairs of Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1735-1892

This series includes legal documents and correspondence related to Shipley's travel, mortgages, and estate. Documents include Joseph Shipley's passport, his real estate correspondence, and his last will and testament (which names Thomas S. Newlin, Edward Bringhurst, and Samuel H. Dixon as trustees of his estate). The series also includes over sixty deeds for Shipley's properties in Brandywine Hundred; Christiana Hundred (Wilmington); Randolph County, Virginia; and Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Deeds for Brandywine Hundred pertain to land transactions and acquisitions that eventually yielded the summation of Rockwood property. Other deeds relate to property owned by Joseph Shipley, Jr. and his extended family in Wilmington, Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

Legal documents and correspondence , 1781-1892

Passports and travel documents , 1819-1851   [Box 2 F91] (Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Includes "passe-port au nom du roi … " allowing safe passage to Paris, 1819; certificate of arrival in the port of Dover, 1820; passport and travel book of passport stamps on trip Joseph Shipley took with Edward Bringhurst to France and Italy, 1851. See also papers of Edward Bringhurst.

Notes on mortgage liens , 1794-1892   [Box 2 F92]

Includes list judgment liens and lien holders and additional notes in unknown hand.

Will, inventory and settlement of Joseph Shipley, Jr., estate , 1864-1867, 1875   [Box 2 F92a]

Includes copy of the last will and testament of Joseph Shipley, Jr., bequeathing unto his sisters his share of his father's estate, his real estate in Wilmington, and the Rockwood estate. Property Shipley owned in Dauphin County Pennsylvania, (site of the former Victoria Iron Works) was bequeathed to niece Emma Bayard. Other Brandywine Hundred land was given to Samuel H. Dixon and Mary Anna Paschall. Shipley named Thomas S. Newlin, Edward Bringhurst, Samuel H. Dixon trustees of his estate. Also includes a later assignment of mortgage discharging Thomas Newlin as executor and transferring mortgages to Edward Bringhurst and Samuel H. Dixon. Settlement materials include a list of releases of trust, an Internal Revenue Service account of excise tax on legacies, a list of shares and bonds, and an inventory of Shipley library. (Look for Downing's Treatise) on the theory and practice of landscape)

Real estate documents and mortgages , 1781-1863   [Box 2 F93] (Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Surveys, indentures, correspondence and legal documents relating to sheriff sale purchases of real estate by Joseph Shipley. Shipley aided his niece Emma Dixon Bayard and her husband Henry M. Bayard by purchasing the Victoria estate, a site that the Bayards had previously owned but lost due to overwhelming debt. The Victoria estate was the site of the then-operational Victoria Iron Works. Shipley arranged the transaction with the help of prominent Philadelphia lawyer Eli Kirk Price whose correspondence can be found in this folder. Also includes mortgages held by Joseph Shipley, Jr., including one to Edward Bringhurst, Sr. Also includes letter and land survey sent to Joseph Shipley from Benjamin Ferris, brother of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst, and an early Wilmington city surveyor, historian, and watchmaker. Ferris's survey is a depiction of the intentions of the will of Thomas Shipley, grandfather of Joseph Shipley, Jr., for division of lots between Market and King Streets in Wilmington.

Folder 94 is empty   [Box 2 F94]

Deeds , 1735-1864

The deeds of Joseph Shipley, Jr. have four subdivisions based upon location: Brandywine Hundred deeds include indentures and transactions relating to land eventually encompassing Rockwood; Christiana Hundred (Wilmington) deeds comprise documents pertaining largely to land accumulated by the Shipley family near the intersection of Market Street and the Brandywine Creek in Wilmington, Delaware; Virginia deeds consist of two documents relating to four thousand acres of land originally granted to Joseph Shipley Sr. in 1786; and Victoria estate deeds pertain to property Shipley purchased in Dauphin County Pennsylvania to assist his niece, Emma Dixon Bayard. The deeds are arranged in reverse chronological order and Shipley property can be traced regressively to its early Wilmington origins. In the Christiana Hundred, this included land originally owned by early Swede settler and Kalmar Nyckel passenger Dr. Tyman Stidham. Other land can be traced to Thomas Willing after whom the original Wilmington settlement of Willingtown (or Willingstown) took its name. Additionally, some of the documents contain signatures of United States Constitution signers Jacob Broom and Gunning Bedford, Jr.

Brandywine Hundred deeds (1 of 3) , 1850-1864

Brandywine Hundred deeds comprise the series of land transactions in Delaware’s Brandywine Hundred that eventually yielded the summation of Rockwood. Arranged in reverse chronological order, the land’s history can be traced regressively to ownership by the Beeson, Weldin, Forwood (also spelled Forewood), Moore, Hartt (also spelled Heartt, Heart and Hart) and Jackson families. Joseph Shipley, Jr.’s purchase and integration of land circa 1850s is the culmination of nearly a century of land indentures and deed polls that included “Mansion Farm,” (formerly of the Weldin family), and many other tracts of land bordering or nearby the often-cited Turkey Run and Shellpot Creeks (also spelled Shelpot). Many of the deeds were produced on vellum and contain varying and unique wax and paper seals. In addition, some of the documents contain signatures of Gunning Bedford, Jr. and Jacob Broom, both signers of the United States Constitution and notable Delawareans.

Item 1.A.1-2

Joseph Hanby and wife Catherine Hanby to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1864   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Bringhurst and Hanby land along Shelpot Creek. On paper with seals.

Item 1.B.1-2

Abraham Cannon, Late Sheriff to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1861   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of John Allmond, Edward Beeson, Joseph Shipley, and Shellpot Creek containing forty eight acres of land. This deed poll is for property seized by Abraham Cannon, Sheriff for damages against Richard Justison and later auctioned to Joseph Shipley. On paper with seals. Contains watermark "Wilcox Philad[elphia].

Item 1.C.1-2

David Forwood to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1859   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by the land of Joseph Shipley purchased from John Beeson, Shelpot Creek, and the public road, being part of the land sold to Forwood by William G. Whitely in 1843. On paper with seals.

Item 1.D.1-2

Sarah Worral to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1858   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Thomas Talley and Turkey Run, formerly owned by Jacob Weldin, On paper with seals. Contains watermark "John Clark- Phil[adlephia]."

Item 1.E.1-2

Edward Bringhurst Sr. and wife Sarah to Joseph Shipley , 1856   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by the public road, a "new stone wall," and a "new corner on the cliffs," formerly belonging to John Elliott III and Susanna S. Elliott. On paper with seals. Contains watermark "Wilcox Philad[elphia].

Item 1.F.1-2

John Elliott III to Joseph Shipley , 1854   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Weldin Road, Turkey Run, land of Edward Bringhurst, John Allmond, and other Shipley land (formerly of the Weldins and Thomas Harker). On vellum with seals. Formerly land of Richard Rambo and Elizabeth L. Rambo land sold to John Elliot in 1836.

Item 1.G.1-2

John Beeson to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1852   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of John Beeson and David H. Forewood, Shelpot Creek, and a "black oak stump." On vellum with seals.

Item 1.H.1-2

Levi Weldin to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 25 March 1851   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For the tract of land called "Mansion Farm," bounded by Shelpot Creek, Turkey Run, and land of John Elliot III and the late Richard Rambo. On vellum with seals. Shipley purchased of Weldin's "Mansion Farm" for four thousand three hundred forty dollars.

Item 1.I.1-2

Peter Phillips to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 22 March 1851    [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of John Allmond, Edward Bringhurst, John Beeson, Shelpot Creek, and land recently purchased by Shipley from Weldin. On vellum with seals.

Item 1.J.1-2

William Weldin and others to Levi M Weldin , 1850   [Box 2 F95] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For the tract of land called the "Mansion Farm" bounded by Shelpot Creek, Turkey Run and land of Joseph Gibson and Thomas Talley. Sold for five dollars. On paper with seals.

Brandywine Hundred deeds (2 of 3) , 1824-1848

Item 2.A.1-2

Harman Justison and wife Elizabeth to Joseph Jefferis , 1848   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Jacob Weldin, Thomas Talley, and Turkey Run. On vellum with seals. This deed unites ownership of land purchased by Justison in 1824, 1838, and 1847 from the Green, Pierce, and Creighton families, respectively.

Item 2.B.1-2

Bond of Peter Phillips unto John Elliott III , 1848   [Box 2 F96]

For $700.00, repaid in three payments from 1850-1851.

Item 2.C.1-2

John Elliott III to Peter Phillips , 1847   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of John Allmond, John Elliot, John Beeson, Levi Weldin, and Shelpot Creek. On paper with seals. Sale of the same land in the 1846 McHugh and Elliott transaction.

Item 2.D.1-2

Patrick McHugh and Bridget McHugh wife to John Elliott III , 1846   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of John Allmond, John Elliot, John Beeson, Levi Weldin, and Shelpot Creek. On paper with seals. Contains two star-shaped watermarks.

Item 2.E.1-2

John Elliott III to Thomas Babb , 1844   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Thomas Babb, John Allmond, and Shelpot Creek formerly belonging to Richard Rambo. On vellum with seals.

Item 2.F.1-2

Elihu Jefferson, Sheriff to Thomas Babb , 1838   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

This deed poll auctioned land descended from the 1784 Joseph Jackson to Jasper Beeson transaction, bounded by land formerly of Thomas Hollingsworth and Shelpot Creek. On vellum with seals.

Item 2.G.1-2

Elias Pierce and wife Sarah Ann Pierce to Harman Justison , 1838   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by other land of Harman Justison and Turkey Run. Witnessed by the Weldins and Forwoods. This deed brings together land descended from the Moores to Dennis Harrt, then to Samuel Green and James Creighton (who both married Hartts) to join land descended from Joseph Jackson's 1818 transaction with Weldin. On vellum with seals.

Item 2.H.1-2

Isaac Weldin to Eliza Pierce , 1835   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Jacob Weldin, Dennis Heart, Mary Hartt, and Turkey Run. On vellum with seals.

Item 2.I.1-2

Joseph Weldin and wife Rebecah Weldin [Rebecca] to Isaac L. Weldin (son). On paper. , 1827   [Box 2 F96]

For property bounded by Turkey Run, and land of Jacob Weldin. Also for a lot of marsh "in Ventredy Hook or Cherry Island Marsh."

Item 2.J.1-2

Joseph Weldin and wife Rebecah Weldin to Levi Weldin (son) , 1827   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For sixty acres of land containing "Mansion farm," bounded on the South by Shellpot Creek, on the Northeast by lands of Joseph Gibson, and on the West and Southwest by Turkey Run and the lands of Thomas Talley. Sold for one dollar. On vellum with seals.

Item 2.K.1-2

Samuel Green and wife Sarah Hartt Green to Harman Justison , 1824   [Box 2 F96] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Turkey Run and the lands of Robert Donaldson and Thomas Talley formerly belonging to Mary Heartt (Hartt). On vellum with seals.

Brandywine Hundred deeds (3 of 3) , 1781-1824

Item 3.A.1-2

James Creighton and wife Maria Creighton to Harman Justison , 1824, 1847   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For twenty-eight acres of land bordering Justison and Talley land. James Creighton married Maria Hart(t) whose mother Mary Hartt bestowed land on three children: Joseph, Sarah (who married Samuel Green) and the aforementioned Maria. Creighton also inherited other land from Mary Hartt bound by Donaldson and Talley. On paper with seals.

Item 3.B.1-2

Joseph Jackson Sr. and wife Catherine Jackson to Joseph Weldin , 1818   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Jacob Weldin, Dennis Heart, Mary Hartt, and Turkey Run. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.C.1-2

Nathan Milner and wife Mary Milner to Samuel Jordan , 1797   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Thomas Hollingsworth and Shelpot Creek. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.D.1-2

Francis Moore to Dennis Hartt , 1793   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by other land belonging to Dennis Hartt and Turkey Run. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.E.1-2

William Moore to Dennis Hartt , 1791   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land of Andrew Gibson, Jacob Weldin, other land of William Moore, and Turkey Run. Signed by Gunning Bedford, Jr. On vellum.

Item 3.F.1-2

Hugh Thomson to Nathan Milner , 1790   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land formerly of Thomas Hollingsworth, Turkey Run, and Shelpot Creek. Signed by Jacob Broom. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.G.1-2

Joshua Gibson and wife Lydia Gibson to Hugh Thomson , 1788   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by land formerly of Thomas Hollingsworth, Turkey Run, and Shelpot Creek. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.H.1-2

Jasper Beeson and wife Mary Beeson to Joshua Gibson , 1786   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Shelpot Creek and land formerly of Thomas and Valentine Hollingsworth. On vellum with seals. This deed refers to the land sold in the 1781 Jackson and Beeson transaction plus and additional seventy acres. On vellum with seals.

Item 3.I.1-2

Joseph Jackson Jr. and wife Susanna Jackson to Jasper Beeson , 1781   [Box 2 F97] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Shelpot Creek and land of Thomas and Valentine Hollingsworth. Signed by Gunning Bedford, Thomas Foulk, and Jacob Broom. On vellum with seals.

Christiana Hundred (Wilmington) deeds (1 of 3) , 1834-1864

Christiana Hundred (Wilmington) deeds comprise transactions relating to tracts of land obtained by the Shipley family at a Christiana Hundred location in the vicinity of Market and King Streets at their intersection with Brandywine Creek. Arranged in reverse chronological order, some of the land’s history can be traced regressively to ownership by Dr. Timen Stiddem (also spelled Tyman, Tymon, Steddem and Stidham), a physician and surgeon who arrived on the tall ship Kalmar Nyckel as part of Peter Minuit's original attempt at the establishment of the New Sweden colony in 1638. Stiddem later became Christina's (Wilmington's) first resident physician. The land of Dr. Tyman Stidham was willed to his nine children and was eventually bought and willed to Timothy Stedham, son of Lulof and grandson of Dr. Tyman Stidham. Stidham land eventually became property of the Shipley family through 1736, 1741 1742, 1745, 1757, 1759, and 1767 transactions. The earliest deeds, on paper, contain varying and unique wax seals and reference “The Kings Road.” Other deeds, produced on vellum and parchment, also contain unique wax seals. In addition, some of the documents contain signatures of Philadelphia mayor John Barker, New York mayors DeWitt Clinton and Robert H. Morris, and notable Delawarean and United States Constitution signer Gunning Bedford Jr. In addition, a deed dated 1735 is sealed, and delivered by Thomas Willing, for whom the city of Wilmington (then Willingtown or Willings Town) was originally named.

Item 4.A.1-2

Edward Bringhurst Sr. to Joseph Shipley , 1864   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a lot of land bounded by West, Eighth, and Ninth Streets. On paper with seals.

Item 4.B.1-2

Samuel S. Grubb to Joseph Tatnall, Edward Tatnall, and William Tatnall , 1861   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a lot of land bounded by West, Eighth, and Ninth Streets. On paper with seals.

Item 4.C.1-2

Thomas M. Cann to Wilmington Saving Society , 1861   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property bounded by Adams, Eight, and Ninth Streets. On paper with seals.

Item 4.D.1-2

Henry F. Dure and wife Narcissa O. Dure to Joseph Shipley , 1860   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property at 12th, King, and Market Streets, acquired by Dure from the estate of Dr. George Stevenson in 1859. Signed in the presence of George S. Grubb. On paper with seals. Contains watermark "Wilcox- Philad[elphia]."

Item 4.E.1-2

Rev. John McClintock and wife Catherine W. McClintock to Joseph Shipley , 1860   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For property at 12th, King, and Market Streets, acquired by McClintock from estate of Dr. George Stevenson in 1859. On paper with seals. Contains watermark "Wilcox- Philad[elphia]."

Item 4.F.1-2

James Rogers, exec. for Dr. George Stevenson to Henry F. Dure , 1859   [Box 2 F98]

For property bounded by 12th, King, and Market Streets. On paper with seals.

Item 4.G.1-2

James Rogers, exec. for Dr. George Stevenson to Rev. John McClintock , 1859   [Box 2 F98]

For a lot of land at 12th and King Streets. On paper.

Item 4.H.1-2

Edward Bringhurst Sr. executor to Samuel Shipley and Joseph Shipley , 1854   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a house and lot of land at French and Stedham streets in Wilmington. On paper with seals. Contains watermark "John Clark- Phil[adlephia]."

Item 4.I.1-2

Merrit Canby and wife Eliza Canby to John Shipley , 1854   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For land on the southwest side of Mill Street adjacent to other John Shipley land. Richard H. Bayard, trustee, sold the land to Merrit Canby in 1839. On paper with seals.

Item 4.J.1-2

Merrit Canby and wife Eliza Canby to John Shipley , 1846   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a brick house and lot of land in the city of Wilmington. Transferred from Union Bank of Delaware to Merrit Canby in 1842. On paper with seals.

Item 4.K.1-2

Heirs of Mary Dixon to Joseph Shipley , 1846   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Heirs of Mary Dixon (widow of John) include Joseph Dixon and wife Sarah E., Samuel Dixon and wife Margaret, Henry H. Paschall and wife Mary Anna (Dixon) Paschall, Thomas Dixon and wife Elizabeth, and Henry Bayard and wife Emma (Dixon) Bayard. Three acres with a stone dwelling house. For one seventh of sundry lots of land in Wilmington, Delaware. On vellum with seals. Sold to Joseph Shipley, still residing in Liverpool. In the presence of John Buchard.

Item 4.L.1-2

Thomas Buckley and wife Anna Buckley to Joseph Shipley , 1841   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

At Market and Franklin and King streets. Witnessed by Robert H. Morris, 64th mayor of New York. On parchment with seals.

Item 4.M.1-2

Mary (Levis) Shipley to Joseph Shipley, Jr. , 1834   [Box 2 F98] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Probably descending from the 1812 Buckley/Shipley transaction, a brick messuage (dwelling house) and lot is willed to Shipley. On vellum with seals.

Christiana Hundred (Wilmington) deeds (2 of 3)

Item 5.A.1-2

Peter B. Delaney, Esq. and Sheriff to Joseph Bringhurst , 1826   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Land formerly belonging to Patrick O Flynn which was to be sold at the time of his death. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.B.1-2

Samuel Shipley to Sarah Buckley, Ann Buckley, and Phineas W. Buckley , 1813   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Mortgage for a messuage (dwelling house) and lot of land bound by French Street, the Long Race land of Joseph Shipley, and Stedham Street (being the same as the 1812 Buckley and Shipley transaction). On paper with seals. Contains watermark depicting a dove and olive branch.

Item 5.C.1-2

Thomas Buckley and wife Anna and other heirs of Mary Buckley to Samuel Shipley. , 1812   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Certified by Philadelphia mayor John Barker. Acknowledged by DeWitt Clinton, mayor of New York. For a brick messuage and lot of land bounded by French Street, and the long race, land of Joseph Shipley and Stedham Street. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.D.1-2

Samuel Shipley to William Poole , 1803   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Mortgage deed for property bounded by French Street, Brandywine Creek, and the northerly line of Long Race. On paper with seals. Formerly land of William Poole and Sarah Poole.

Item 5.E.1-2

John Stockton, High Sheriff to Joseph Shipley, Sr. , 1790   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Signed by Gunning Bedford. Land recovered from Joseph Stidham.

Item 5.F.1-2

John Buckley to Thomas Shipley , 1771   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a lot of land on Brandywine Creek in the borough of Wilmington. Buckley bought land from Timothy Stidham and still more from his son Joseph Stidham, bordering the land obtained by Shipley in 1757 transaction and 1759 (formerly Stidham to Peterson land) transaction. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.G.1-2

Joseph Stedham to Benjamin Willson , 1771   [Box 2 F99]

For a lot bordering Market Street and the lines of Thomas Shipley and Daniel Byrnes.

Item 5.H.1-2

Thomas Canby and Benjamin Canby, executors to Thomas Shipley , 1767   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For a lot of land in Wilmington akin to the Thomas West/Thomas Canby transaction of 1745. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.I.1-2

Robert Lewis and wife Mary Lewis to Thomas Shipley , 1764   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Twenty-three acres formerly belonging to Peter Osborn, adjacent to Peter Peterson land and Jonas Stidham land. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.J.1-2

Thomas Duff Esq. High Sheriff to Peter Osborn (highest bidder) , 1763   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

In partnership with Thomas Gibson. On vellum with seals.

Item 5.K.1-2

Obligation for Thomas Shipley to John Stapler , 1761   [Box 2 F99]

Obligation for one thousand pounds currency borrowed from Stapler by Shipley using land purchased by Shipley in the 1759 Peterson transaction to secure repayment. On paper with watermark "CR."

Item 5.L.1-2

Peter Peterson and wife Rebecah Peterson to Thomas Shipley , 1759   [Box 2 F99] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Containing home property bounded by King, French, 15th street, and Brandywine Creek. Signed by Gunning Bedford. On vellum with seals

Christiana Hundred (Wilmington) deeds (3 of 3)

Item 6.A.1-2

Timothy Stedham to Thomas Shipley , 16 September 1757   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Land bounded by Market, French, and 15th street and old Straham line. North of the school house lot. Signed by Gunning Bedford. On vellum with seals.

Item 6.B.1-2

Timothy Stedham to Peter Peterson , 4 June 1757   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Four acres of land from King Street to Walnut to 15th (Stedham St) to Brandywine Creek. The land of Dr. Tyman Stedham was willed to his nine children, which was eventually bought or willed to Timothy Stedham, son of Lulof and grandson of Dr. Tyman Stedham. On vellum with seals.

Item 6.C.1-2

Heirs of Thomas West and wife Susannah West to Thomas Canby , 1745   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For two lots of land in Wilmington, adjacent to other Canby land, bordering Orange and Water streets and the Kings Road. On paper with seals. Contains watermark consisting of a fleur de lis.

Item 6.D.1-2

William Shipley and wife Elizabeth Shipley to Thomas Shipley , 1743   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Lot in Wilmington bordering Market Square and Market Street. On vellum with seals.

Item 6.E.1-2

Samuel Scott and wife Ann Scott to West , 22 February 1742   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For three acres of pastureland near Brandywine Mill, along the Kings Road adjacent to Thomas Canby's pastures. On paper with seals. Contains watermark consisting of a fleur de lis above shield with bend cotised.

Item 6.F.1-2

Samuel Scott and wife Ann Scott to Joseph Canby , 22 February 1742   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Three acres bordering Thomas West's land along the Kings Road. On paper with seals. Contains watermark of fleur de lis above shield with bar sinister.

Item 6.G.1-2

Thomas Milner and wife Bridget Milner to Samuel Scott , 1741   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Samuel Kirk willed this land to John Richardson who willed it to John Seeds. After Seed's death, his wife Bridget married Thomas Milner who sold it to Samuel Scott. Deed on paper with seals. Contains watermark consisting of a fleur de lis above shield with bend cotised.

Item 6.H.1-2

Timothy Stedham to John Seeds , 1736   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Six acres along the Kings Road in the Christiana Hundred. On paper with seals.

Item 6.I.1-2

Samuel Kirk and wife Margaret Kirk to William Shipley , 1735   [Box 2 F100] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

For five thousand four hundred square feet at the western end of Market Square on Market Street. Sealed and delivered in the presence of Thomas Willing. On vellum with seals. This folder also contains two portions of another document (on paper) dated the same day, one of Charles Springer certifying that Margaret Kirk(e) did voluntarily sign the document (also signed by Thomas Willing). The other portion states that Samuel Kirk and Margaret, wife, do appoint David [Frouch] attorney. Also included is a small exhibit label from the Historical Society of Delaware from an undated loan of the item.

Randolph County, Virginia, deeds , 1802, 1846

Randolph County Virginia deeds comprise transactions relating to four thousand acres granted to Joseph Shipley, Sr. in 1786.

Item 7.A.1-2

Thomas Newlin, executor of Joseph Shipley Sr., deceased, to John Shipley , 1846   [Box 2 F101]

Joseph Shipley Sr. willed four thousand acres of land in Randolph County, Virginia, to son John Shipley. On paper.

Item 7.B.1-2

Land Grant-- John Page, Esq., Governor, to Joseph Shipley Sr. , 1802   [Box 2 F101]

For four thousand acres of land in Randolph County, Virginia, in conformity to an 1802 re-surveying of land originally granted to Joseph Shipley Sr. by patent in 1786. On vellum with seals.

Victoria estate deeds , 1847

Victoria estate deeds relate to land in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, that Shipley purchased circa 1850 to assist the family of his niece, Emma Bayard.

Item 8.A.1-2

Ann Caroline Bayard to the President Directors and Company of the Bank of Pennsylvania. , 1847   [Box 2 F102]

For Victoria Iron Works, 1600 acres of land, which includes structures and livestock as a partial payment towards a large sum of debt. Ann Caroline Bayard was the mother of Henry M. Bayard who married Emma Dixon, Shipley's niece. On paper with seals.

Series I.F. Legal records and personal papers of other Shipley relatives , 1774-1895

Individuals in this series are described in terms of their relationship to Joseph Shipley, Jr.

Receipt signed by Alexander Hamilton Shipley , 1774 July   [Box 2 F103]

Relationship unknown. Received of S. Bringhurst, Brooklyn, for share of Delaware Rail Road stock.

Thomas Shipley (1718-1789) , 1788 and undated   [Box 2 F104]

Grandfather of Joseph Shipley, Jr. Includes Deborah Morris letter to Thomas Shipley (1718-1789) and autograph copy of the Last Will and Testament of Thomas Shipley

Joseph Shipley Sr. (1752-1832) , 1781-1846   [Box 3 F105] (Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (17 and 20 inches))

Legal papers and related documents of Joseph Shipley, Jr.'s father. Includes several items of note: 1775 marriage license to Mary Shipley, 1781 agreement for lease of a mill between Thomas Shipley, Joseph Shipley, and Samuel Canby of one part and Samuel Paxson and John Grubb on the other part; 1809 letter from Phoebe Shipley to her father Joseph; 1824 copy of record of a 1783 land grant assigned to Joseph Shipley by Patrick Henry, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia; Draft of Brown & Shipley's Survey in Randolph County, undated; and an 1822 agreement between Joseph Shipley and Samuel Shipley from the Bank of Wilmington and Brandywine. The document loan form was printed by James Wilson, no. 105, Market Street, Wilmington. Also includes account book documenting Joseph Shipley Sr.'s household expenses from 1824-1829.

Samuel Shipley (1777-1848) , 1803-1854   [Box 3 F106]

Samuel Shipley, oldest son of Joseph Shipley, Sr., and brother of Joseph Shipley, Jr. Samuel Shipley became a cooper and was heir to the Shipley milling business. Includes documents and correspondence. Two items of interest related to Shipley's marriage to Elizabeth Jefferis: "Certificate of disownment of Samuel Shipley on a/c of his marriage," August 4, 1803; and Captain James Jefferis letter to his daughter Elizabeth Jefferis Shipley, March 16, 1803, "On board the Neptune." The disownment is signed by John Ferris, Clerk of the Wilmington Monthly Meeting, to Samuel Shipley for having "accomplished his marriage by the assistance of a hireling Teacher, with a Woman not in membership with us, after being cautioned against it ... " Samuel Shipley's correspondence also appears frequently throughout his brother's correspondence files in Series. I.B.

Samuel Shipley for estate of Thomas Shivers , 1841-1844   [Box 3 F107]

Samuel Shipley, oldest son of Joseph Shipley, Sr., and brother of Joseph Shipley, Jr.

Thomas Shipley (1805-1864) , 1855   [Box 3 F108]

Second oldest son of Samuel Shipley and nephew of Joseph Shipley, Jr.

Thomas Shipley (1805-1864) scrapbook , 1816   [Box 3 F109]

School practice book identified as being owned by Thomas Shipley, dated 1816, which was later reused as a scrapbook for the collection of religious verses and poetry, which were pasted to the pages.

Samuel H. Shipley (1809-1814) , 1868   [Box 3 F110]

Samuel H. Shipley (1809-1814), nephew to Joseph Shipley, Jr., and third son of Joseph's older brother, Samuel Shipley. Indenture between Victor Du Pont, a trustee appointed by the Orphans Court for New Castle County, to make sale of the real estate of Samuel H. Shipley, an infant, to Sarah Shipley and Hannah Shipley of Brandywine Hundred.

Jefferis family papers , 1790-1895   [Box 3 F111]

Captain James Jefferis (of the ship Neptune) was the father of Elizabeth Jefferis, who married Samuel Shipley in 1803. Samuel Shipley was Joseph Shipley, Jr.'s oldest brother. Includes correspondence and receipts, including a letter regarding the War of 1812, and a bill of sale for the brig Mary to James Jefferis, as well as documents of genealogical information.

John Shipley (1782-1863) , 1836-1860   [Box 3 F112]

Third son of Joseph Shipley, Sr., and older brother of Joseph Shipley, Jr. John Shipley was a sailor. Includes item of note: "Beauties on the Island of Otaheite in the Pacific Ocean," March 14, 1836, by John Shipley on the Ship Ceres .

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.

Emerging series-level descriptions with details for this subgroup are available here but detailed folder lists about the contents of this series are not yet available. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for assistance.

Series II.A. Pre-Rockwood Bringhursts , 1660-1908

The Pre-Rockwood era Bringhursts comprise the ancestors of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna James Webb Bringhurst and their descendants, the later generations who acquired the Rockwood mansion from the estate of Joseph Shipley and lived there continuously from 1892 until the property was donated to New Castle County in 1975. Primary amongst these early ancestors were Dr. Joseph Bringhurst (1767-1834) and his wife Deborah Ferris Bringhurst (1773-1844), both of whom were prominent in religious, social, intellectual, and political circles throughout their lives. Papers related to the Pre-Rockwood era Bringhursts provide rich documentation of Quaker families active in the post-Revolutionary, early Federal period of American history in Wilmington, Delaware, and Philadelphia.

In addition to family papers from the generation of Dr. Joseph and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst, this series also includes a substantial amount of documentation related to earlier Bringhurst ancestors. Important biographical and genealogical information is drawn from History of the Bringhurst family with notes on the Clarkson, De Peyster and Boude families by Josiah Granville Leach (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1901), hereinafter referred to as "Leach."

Subseries II.A.1. Bringhurst ancestors , 1660-1903

The Bringhurst ancestors subseries comprises materials relating to the predecessors of Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst and the establishment of the Bringhurst, Claypoole, Pole, and Ferris families in the greater Delaware Valley.

Thomas Bringhurst (born 1621) , 1660-1669

Thomas Bringhurst (born 1621), the grandfather of the Bringhursts who emigrated to Pennsylvania about 1700, was a chirurgeon (physician and surgeon) of London, England. Thomas Bringhurst married Elizabeth Hughes in 1647. (Leach, p. 17-18.)

Thomas Bringhurst legal documents , 1660, 1669   [Box 3 F1]

The folder contains two documents: the first is a letter giving power of attorney by Dr. Thomas Bringhurst to his wife Elizabeth (Hughes) Bringhurst, 1660; and the second is a document appointing Thomas Bringhurst as master surgeon of the ship HMS Portsmouth in 1669, as written by J. Dearse. A facsimile of the 1660 power of attorney is published in Leach, plate next to page 17.

John Bringhurst (1655-circa 1699) , 1679-1772

John Bringhurst (1655-circa 1699) was the son of Thomas Bringhurst and Elizabeth Hughes Bringhurst. After apprenticing as a stationer (bookseller) to Andrew Toaler, he began his own business as a publisher and stationer circa 1681. His first publication was probably “An Epistle of Caution to Friends to take heed of that Treacherous Spirit, … with a Short Testimony prepared by John Bringhurst.” Many of his early publications (including pamphlets found in this collection) included the imprint: “Printed in London for John Bringhurst, at the sign of the Book in Grace-Church Street.” As a member of the Society of Friends, Bringhurst had a successful career printing and publishing Friends’ pamphlets and books. However, his printing of George Fox’s Primer contained passages that upset London authorities, and he was arrested, tried, and sentenced to stand two hours in the pillory and a fine of one shilling. He removed to another part of London, at the “Sign of the Book and Three Black Birds, in Leaden-Hall-Mutton Market, between the Black Bull and Colchester Arms.” In 1682, he married German-born Rosina Prachen, daughter of Reverend Hillarius and Barbara Prachen, and widow to Quaker John Matern (Leach, p. 18-22).

Pamphlets , 1682-circa 1685

George Fox, Concerning persecution in all ages to this day…. (London : Printed by John Bringhurst, at the Sign of the Book in Grace-Church Street). , 1682   [Box 3 F2]

George Fox, All friends every where this is the word of the lord unto you all. (London : Printed by John Bringhurst, 1683). , 1683   [Box 3 F2]

This pamphlet is indicative of John Bringhurst's move from Grace-Church Street to "the GreenYard, between the Sign of the Black-Bull and the Colchester-Arms." Bringhurst indicated, "Any Persons may be supplyed with Printing, Books, and Paper, as formerly.

Stephen Crisp, A Faithful Warning And Exhortation To Friends To Beware Of Seducing Spirits, And To Keep On The Armour Of Light In Simplicity And Sincerity, As Their Best Armour In All Trials . (London: Printed by John Bringhurst at the Sign of the Book and Three Black Birds, in Leaden Hall, Mutton Market, 1684). [Number 32, lift edit, annotated “20 pp. only”] , 1684   [Box 3 F2]

Stephen Crisp, A Faithful Warning And Exhortation To Friends To Beware Of Seducing Spirits, And To Keep On The Armour Of Light In Simplicity And Sincerity, As Their Best Armour In All Trials . (London: Printed by John Bringhurst at the Sign of the Book and Three Black Birds, in Leaden Hall, Mutton Market, 1684). [Number 32, 22 pp.] , 1684   [Box 3 F2]

Thomas Camm, John Story, and John Wilkinson, Quaker of Westmoreland, The Line of Truth And True Judgment, Stretched over the Heads of Falsehood and Deceit.... (London: Printed by John Bringhurst, 1684). [no. 24] , 1684   [Box 3 F2]

Dorcas Dole, A salutation of my endeared love to the faithful in all places. (London : Printed by John Bringhurst in Leaden-hall, 1685). , 1685   [Box 3 F2]

John and Rosina Matern , 1679-1772

John Matern (1639/1640-1680) was a schoolmaster under Christopher Taylor of Waltham Abbey, and later of Edmonton. Matern was German by birth and "a man of learning, having been educated in the colleges of his country and designed for the office of priest." After his death in 1680, his widow Rosina Prachen Matern married bookseller John Bringhurst. This folder contains Quaker writing of the Materns including testimony by Rosina Matern about the life of John Matern.

Christopher Tayler; A. Paterson, Quaker; Frances Taylor; John Matern. A testimony to the Lord’s power and blessed appearance in and amongst children… (London : publisher not identified). , 1679   [Box 3 F3]

This pamphlet may have been published at or near Waltham Abbey in Essex. As it indicates, it was "Published for the use of Friends, and to prevent various Reports, that they may have a true Account of the following testimonies, given forth by Faithful Witnesses."

John Matern, A. Paterson, Christopher Taylor The testimony of that dear and faithful man, John Matern who had lived six years and faithfully served the Lord in his vocation in the family... (London : printed, and are to be sold by Ben. Clark in George-Yard in Lumbard-street, 1680). , 1680   [Box 3 F3]

Barnard, Mary, afterwards Mary Dickenson, of Uperthorpe, near Sheffield. To the Memory of the late Samuel Fothergill, William Hunt, and John Woolman, eminent Ministers amongst the People called Quakers. Written by M. Baynard, a Young Woman, of Upperthorpe, near Sheffield. (London : Sold by Darton and Co., No 66, Gracechurch-street). , 1772   [Box 3 F3]

Christopher Taylor; Martha Winter Routh. An account of a divine visitation and blessing attending the religious care and exercise of the teachers of Waltham-Abbey School : with the gracious dealings of the Almighty towards some others in tender years. Philadelphia : Printed by Samuel Sansom, Jun. no. 27, Mulberry-Street., 1797. , 1797   [Box 3 F3]

This Quaker text contains the writings of John Matern, Rosina Matern, and James Claypoole. This copy contains an annotation by Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.: "Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., from his uncle Joseph Bringhurst," as well as two annotations by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst regarding Rosina Matern: " This friend afterwards became the wife of John Bringhurst (father of John Bringhurst who married Mary Claypoole) and was the great, great grandmother of my J.B." and, "Martha Routh, a visiting friend from England who was on a religious visit to Friends in America in 1797."

John Bringhurst, Sr. (1691-1750) , 1722-circa 1789

John Bringhurst, Sr. (1691-1750) grandson of Thomas Bringhurst, was born in either London or Amsterdam and died on the Island of Barbados. He was the son of the printer John Bringhurst (1655-circa 1699) and Rosina Prachen Matern Bringhurst. The date of his arrival in America is uncertain, but by age 10 he was apprenticed to George Guest in Philadelphia as a cooper. As a young man John Bringhurst made several successful sea voyages as a mariner, but after his marriage he settled in Philadelphia and participated in his own cooperage business. In 1718, John Bringhurst married Mary Claypoole (1687-1761). John Bringhurst's success in the cooperage business and other commercial pursuits allowed him to partner and build the Brigantine Joseph with which he imported and exported goods overseas, particularly to and from Barbados. He died in Barbados in 1750 at the home of "Widow Oxley," a family friend. John and Mary Claypoole Bringhurst had three sons and two daughters: Mary Bringhurst Foulke (1720/21-1798, married Judah Foulke); John Bringhurst, Jr. (1722-1789); Elizabeth Bringhurst (1723-1790); James Bringhurst (1730-1810, married first Anne Pole, second Hannah Peters, third Ruth Barker); Thomas Bringhurst (died as infant 1731); and Joseph Bringhurst (1732/33-1811). (Leach, p. 23-24.)

John Bringhurst, Sr., personal documents , 1722-1755   [Box 3 F4]

Folder contains four items: 1722 note dated containing the name Sir Nicholas Lawes, the governor of Jamaica from 1718-1722; genealogical record for the immediate family of John Bringhurst, circa 1737, including notes about the death of two daughters, both named Deborah, who died in infancy; 1745 letter from John Bringhurst to John Watson in which he supports his son-in-law Judah Foulke as appointee for debt collector; and 1755 letter to Mary C [Claypoole] "in Carlisle" addressed as "Polly" from Anna Pole, Philadelphia.

Copied Bringhurst family letters , circa 1789   [Box 3 F5]

One paper-covered, hand-sewn notebook of copied family letters and documents: Thomas Pole letter to "Brother and Sister E. and M. Pole," 1778; "copy of a letter wrote by Richard Hall of Barbados to John Bringhurst in Philadelphia giving an account of his father's death" (the original 1750 letter is available in Folder 6); recounting of a story by John Richardson about the passing of Peter Gardiner in Cumberland; an account of the "last words and dying sayings of Mary daughter of George and Deborah Claypoole her mother and others being present the 14th day of 12 month 1730/1"; and copy of a letter from John Bringhurst to "Son John" who was going on "a second voyage on [trade] and to recover thy health."

John Bringhurst, Jr. (1722-1789) , 1749-1750, undated

John Bringhurst, Jr. (1722-1789) was the first son of John Bringhurst (Sr.) and Mary Claypoole Bringhurst. John Bringhurst, Jr., traveled in trade as did his father and was a prominent iron merchant in Philadelphia. He died unmarried. (Leach, p. 24.)

John Bringhurst correspondence , 1749-1750, undated   [Box 3 F6]

Letters from John Bringhurst to Daniel Stanton regarding news about traveling religious Friends in ministry to islands of Tortola and Antigua. The letters reference John Pickering, Mary Evans, Phebe Smith, Richard Smith and others; letter from sister Elizabeth Bringhurst to John Bringhurst, Jr., in Barbados, undated; letter from Richard Hall in Barbados to John Bringhurst, Jr., merchant in Philadelphia, 1750 September 26, regarding the death of his father; with engraved letterhead of John Bringhurst, Philadelphia.

Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. (1732/33-1811) , 1740-1812

Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. (1731/32-1811) was the third surviving son of John Bringhurst, Sr., and Mary Claypoole Bringhurst. Joseph Bringhurst apprenticed to his father at the trade of cooper, but eventually became a successful merchant in Philadelphia. He was a contributor to the Pennsylvania Hospital and a member of the American Philosophical Society. Like his older brother John, Joseph Bringhurst never married; he left a large estate at his death in 1811. Joseph Bringhurst is referred to as "Senior" after the 1767 birth of his nephew Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. (James Bringhurst's son). "Uncle" Joseph Bringhurst was close to his nephew and his wife, Deborah Bringhurst. Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. kept a journal or "Memorandum" in which he noted happenings that interested him and also recorded many accounts of personal significance. Bringhurst was also a devout Quaker and an active member of the Society of Friends. As material in the collection indicates, he acted as either presiding or recording clerk at Friends Meetings. Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., died in Wilmington in 1811.

Notes on the deaths of father John Bringhurst, Sr., and nephew John Bringhurst , 1750, 1800   [Box 3 F7]

Two documents related to the death of father John Bringhurst, Sr.'s death in 1750: copy of a minute of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting with an additional note about the minister John Oxley of Barbados; with a copy of the 1750 letter from Richard Hall letter about the death of John Bringhurst, Sr. (See related material in Folders 5 and 6.) This folder also contains a paper-covered, hand sewn notebook with an account of the last sickness and death of nephew John Bringhurst (1764-1860), the brother of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.

Memorandums , 1750-1810   [Box 3 F8]

This folder contains a list of the dated "memorandums" of Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., probably written in 1806 and continued in 1810. The list includes significant events in Bringhurst's life including departure dates for his travels and birth and death dates of his family and friends. There are several mentions of prominent Quakers Samuel Fothergill, Joseph Oxley, Samuel Emlen, and others. The folder also contains a note regarding Quaker loyalty during the American Revolution: "During a period in the Revolution no person was able to teach school who would not take 'The Test,' an oath renouncing the British government. As Friends did not think it right to 'swear,' they were at one time prohibited from having schools in Philadelphia. In the year 1777 Uncle Joseph Bringhurst taught the children of his sister [Mary Bringhurst] Foulke and his brother very privately in an upper room."

Israel Pemberton (1715-1779) , 1756   [Box 3 F9]

Copy of "Substance of an Occasional Conversation with several Indians after Dinner at Israel Pemberton's on the 19th of the 4 mo: 1756." Israel Pemberton was a prominent advocate for the land rights of Native Americans and successfully negotiated a peace treaty at this time at a conference in Easton, Pennsylvania. This text contains a listing of all attendees of conference including the Native Americans who were present.

Receipt book , 1757-1791   [Box 3 F10]

Receipts for barrels of flour, rum from Barbados, gammons (salted pork leg), brickwork and stonework, pine and cedar boards, and other various items. Recipients included brother James Bringhurst, William Elliot, William Pusey, and Samuel Merideth, among others. Folder also contains list of expenses for paving an alley on Water Street in Philadelphia belonging to Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., and James and John Cox.

Some account of my dear sister Elizabeth Bringhurst , 1791   [Box 3 F11]

Paper-covered, hand sewn notebook with an account of Elizabeth Bringhurst (1723/24-1790) "during her long continued and painful indisposition with divers expressions which she uttered at different times" until her death from breast cancer, written by brother Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. At the back of the notebook is a 1904 annotation with genealogical information by Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912).

Account book for Bank of North America , 1785-1801   [Box 3 F12]

Ledger includes transactions with members of the Mifflin, Wharton, Foulke, Bringhurst, and Pemberton families.

Correspondence with Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1800-1809   [Box 3 F13]

This folder contains five documents: A note from Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., that had accompanied a gift of a coin purse (not present) to his great-nephew, William Bringhurst (1800-1818), sent the year of his birth. Letter from Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., to his nephew Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., that references Deborah and Ziba Bringhurst, and Benjamin Ferris. The letter also mentions pricing and purchasing of goods such as sugar (in high demand) and turkey opium and originally accompanied a gift of "fresh Vaccine matter," stored in a "lancet in bladder," for inoculating patients (possibly the then-ill William Bringhurst, age two). Letter from Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and Deborah Bringhurst informing Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., about the death of John Dickinson (1808). Letter from Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., informing the elder Joseph about the birth of his son Edward (1809-1884). Letter from Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. informing the elder Joseph regarding the 1809 destruction of John Harrison's Philadelphia chemical laboratory by fire.

Correspondence and legal documents , 1750-1811   [Box 3 F14]

1770 letter from Samuel Nottingham; 1784 letter to Doctor James Danson, collector in Tortola, giving John Parrish and James Cresson favor and supporting their "visit of Gospel love to the Inhabitants of Barbadoes;" Contains three letters from brother James Bringhurst in Newport, Rhode Island. Other correspondents include Samuel Emlen and Native American Peter Pohquonnoppect; Invitation to the funeral of Elizabeth Booth, of Gaskill Street, Philadelphia; Also contains invitation to the funeral of Elizabeth Bringhurst (died 1808).

Copied epistles and testimonies , 1740--1781   [Box 3 F15]

This folder contains writings that were copied from Quaker records by Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. Copied materials include a discourse given by an "Indian Chief," after a Swedish missionary "preached a sermon at an Indian treat of Conestogoe"; a "Few Lines in Love to all Friends," by Hanna Carpenter; and "A Testimony from the Women's Quarterly Meeting in Lancashire concerning our dear friend Lydia Lancaster, deceased."

Some account of the convincement, Christian experiences, and travels of Jane Hoskins , circa 1764   [Box 3 F16]

Testimonial of religious conviction written by Jane Hoskins and copied by personal friend Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.

"The Method to be observed..." Quaker pamphlet , 1774   [Box 3 F17]

Includes tracts by various Quaker leaders regarding methods in "recording Marriages, Births, and Burials, pursuant to the directions of the Yearly-Meeting."

Copy of "William Penn's Council [sic] and Advice to his Dear Wife and Children" , undated   [Box 3 F18]

Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.'s, copy of a William Penn's 1682 letter, "Council and Advice to my Dear Wife and Children."

Notes and dreams , 1757-1808, undated   [Box 3 F19]

Various copied dreams and notes regarding religious experiences, including an account of "a remarkable dream by Elizabeth Shipley…of Wilmington, Delaware," reportedly experienced at the onset of the American Revolution.

Epistles , 1684-1797, undated   [Box 3 F20]

These epistles were copied by Joseph Bringhurst and the exact date of their copy is unknown. Epistles include both advisory letters and speeches declared at Friends meetings. Two of the epistles are written by Samuel Neale. See related materials in Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.--Testimony of Mary Peisley Neale (F24).

Testimonies , 1739-1812   [Box 3 F21]

This folder comprises testimonies bearing witness to the lives of deceased Friends.

Testimonial poems , 1750, undated   [Box 3 F22]

Three original poems by Joseph Bringhurst, one dated 1750 from Oxfordshire.

Copybook , 1756-1772, undated   [Box 3 F23]

Copied items include: "Epistle from William Mott of Marmoneck, New York, 1765"; "Lines by Clement Willets, 1759"; an excerpt of Clement Willets' journal, 1772; "Minutes by Thomas Brown of Philadelphia, 1756"; "Expressions by Samuel Fothergill, London, England, 1772"; and "On the Death of Thomas Thornberg,"undated.

Testimony of Mary Peisley Neale , 1757   [Box 3 F24]

Copy of the testimony written by Samuel Neale in 1757 concerning his wife Mary Peisley Neale. Samuel Neale (1729-1792) was a prominent Irish Quaker who travelled to America to attend various meetings in 1770. His wife Mary Peisley Neale (1717-1757) was also an influential minister who travelled England and America. See related material in Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.--Epistles.

Thomas Chalkley , circa 1741, undated   [Box 3 F25]

Folder contains Joseph Bringhurst's original testimonial poem regarding Captain Thomas Chalkley of Pennsylvania, an eminent Quaker preacher. Also included is another testimonial poem to Chalkley by an unknown writer, and a 1698 sermon of Chalkey's.

Samuel Fothergill , 1757, 1769   [Box 3 F26]

Contains a copied sermon by prominent Quaker minister Samuel Fothergill and two of his epistles to Ellen Evans. Also contains a copy of a letter which contains the spiritual testimony: "The purport of a Dream of Samuel Fothergill."

Friends meetings , 1756-1807   [Box 3 F27]

Extracts from Quaker minutes and proceedings. One copy is signed "Joseph Bringhurst as clerk." The folder also contains a petition for reinstituting rights for disowned Quakers, particularly those who joined the cause of the American Revolution: "That very great numbers of persons have been disowned by the leading men of that society, on various pretences, especially during the present revolution...some for holding offices for the state...some for bearing arms in defence of our invaded country, although the laws of the state enjoined and required it of them."

Philadelphia yearly meeting , 1719   [Box 3 F28]

Minutes from the yearly Quaker meeting held in Philadelphia "for Pennsylvania and the Jerseys," held 21-26 July 1719. Topics included the establishment and order of meetings, the appointment of overseers, directives for differences in opinion between Friends, and instructions for marriages and burials.

Friends meeting records, England and America , 1678-1681   [Box 3 F29]

Records include discourse from William Penn, George Whitehead, Ellis Hookes, Charles Marshall, and George Fox. Some of the meeting locations included London, Westminster, Bristol, Swarthmore, and Barbados.

Warner Mifflin anti-slavery letter , circa 1780-1798   [Box 3 F30]

This folder contains a copy of Warner Mifflin’s speech: "Some remarks proposed for the consideration of the people of Virginia, and particularly of those in the Legislative and Executive Powers of Government." A Virginia native, Mifflin was an internationally recognized Quaker abolitionist, founder of Delaware’s first abolition society, and is recognized as a founding father of abolitionism in the United States.

John Tobler, "The Pennsylvania town and country-man's almanack" , 1768-1769   [Box 3 F31]

John Tobler's annual "almanacks" provided a variety of calendar and astronomical information and contained a variety of ornate woodcuts. This copy contains an incomplete 1768 volume and a complete 1769 volume. The almanac also contains a list of Philadelphia and Wilmington Quaker meeting schedules.

John Tobler, "The Pennsylvania town and country-man's almanack" , 1770-1772   [Box 3 F32]

Folder contains three almanacs, bound together: 1770 edition (incomplete), 1771 edition (complete), and 1772 edition (incomplete). Each contains a list of yearly Philadelphia and Wilmington Quaker meeting schedules. The 1771 almanac was printed by James Adams of Wilmington, Delaware, although other editions were also printed by C. Sower of Germantown, Pennsylvania.

Quaker broadsides , 1763-1787

To George the Third, King of Great-Britain, and the dominions thereunto belonging, the humble address of his Protestant subjects, the people called Quakers (London; [s.n.]). , 1763   [Box 3 F33]

Samuel Fothergill, The substance of a few expressions delivered by Samuel Fothergill : to some of his relations, when they took leave of him, previous to their setting out for the Yearly Meeting in London, viz (Philadelphia : Re-printed by J. Crukshank, in Third-Street). , 1772   [Box 3 F33]

Daniel Byrnes and James Adams A short address to the English colonies in North-America. (Wilmington, Del.; Printed by James Adams). , 1775   [Box 3 F33]

Anti-slavery address by Quaker preacher Daniel Byrnes.

Huson Langstroth, A watch-word in love to Friends in this land. (Philadelphia; [s.n.]). , 1787   [Box 3 F33]

James Bringhurst and Anna Pole Bringhurst , 1756-1809

James Bringhurst (1730-1810) was the second son of John Bringhurst, Sr. and Mary Claypoole. His trade began in carpentry, but like his father John and brothers John and Joseph he later operated a successful mercantile business in Philadelphia for most of his life. He later became a contributor to the Pennsylvania Hospital and a member of the American Philosophical Society. In 1761, he married Anna Pole (1737-1777), whose father John Pole was also a wealthy Philadelphia merchant. Their marriage eventually made James beneficiary of the Pole estate, which further augmented his wealth and included a large tract of land at Gray’s Ferry Road in Philadelphia. James Bringhurst and Anna Pole had six sons and one daughter: John Bringhurst (died as infant 1763); John Bringhurst (1764-1800, married Mary “Polly” Lawton); James Bringhurst (1766-1818, married Rachel Bettle); Joseph Bringhurst (1767-1834, married Deborah Ferris), Jonathan Bringhurst (1769-1818); Edward Bringhurst (1770-1794); and Rachel Bringhurst (died as infant 1776). Soon after Anna Pole’s death in 1777, Bringhurst married Hannah Peters (died 1782). He later married Ruth Barker (1746-1815) after the death of his second wife. James Bringhurst died in 1810 at Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where he had spent the last two years of his life. (Leach p. 30-31)

Correspondence , 1764-1808   [Box 3 F34]

The correspondence of James Bringhurst includes: four letters from wife Anna Pole Bringhurst; James Bringhurst’s letters to son Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and brother Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.; letter from Hannah Peters Bringhurst (James Bringhurst’s second wife) two months before her death in 1782; letter from Caleb Green, describing the tragic loss of his son Gilbert; letter from Lydia Arnold of Hartford, Connecticut, who wrote of Charles and Benjamin Gilbert; letters from Samuel Bishop of Stamford, Connecticut; letter from Owen Biddle (1737-1799), patriot and astronomer, regarding the health of Bringhurst’s (third) wife Ruth Barker Bringhurst; letter from Lindley Murray, grammarian and prominent attorney, who was departing for England for reasons of health; letters from Elizabeth Coggeshall who, while travelling with Hannah Barnard, attended Quaker meetings in London and Ireland in 1798. Coggeshall’s letters reference James’s brother-in-law Thomas Pole, Elizabeth Foulke, statesman John Dickinson, her grandfather James Mitchell, and Dr. Ruth Sherman; letters from Alice Needham of Salem, Massachusetts, who wrote of the “great loss and close trial of [James’s son] John (Bringhurst, Jr. 1722-1789);” letter from John Dickinson thanking Bringhurst for his sympathy during the former's bereavement of his recently deceased wife, Mary Norris Dickinson; 1775 letter from county assessor and collector Thomas Crossan referencing the “action in Boston,” (one month after the Battle of Bunker Hill), and tracts of land in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Crossan also wished Bringhurst well with his young daughter (Rachel Bringhurst who died as an infant in 1776); 1778 letter from James Bringhurst to Hannah Peters (who became his second wife). In this letter, Bringhurst gave an account of a British naval attack on Philadelphia which began the Philadelphia campaign of the American Revolution. Bringhurst described the “battery at Kensington,” and “cannons throwing shells at galleys. Letter also contains engraving (print) of James Bringhurst’s business letterhead (shown in Leach, plate opposite page 28). Other correspondents of James Bringhurst include Quaker Charles Gilbert, Joseph Haddock, Deborah Ferris Bringhurst, and Ruth Sherman.

Pocket diary , 1768-1770   [Box 3 F35]

James Bringhurst's pocket diary contains descriptions of 1769-1770 experiments with preserving wine, a 1768 trip to Friends meetings in New York with Samuel Neale, references to his sister Elizabeth Bringhurst, and a list of money paid to "Nemo," probably the former slave of John Bringhurst (1691-1750).

Some Account of a Visit Paid to the Indians… , 1795   [Box 3 F36]

James Bringhurst's copy of the 1795 report "Some Account of a Visit Paid to the Indians Situated on the Frontiers of the State of New York," by George Embree, John Murray, Jr., and Thomas Eddy, under an appointment from The Meeting for Sufferings and the Committee of the Yearly Meeting of New York on Indian Affairs."

Account of New Jersey , circa 1756   [Box 3 F37]

An account of the history of New Jersey. Deborah Bringhurst's annotation indicates that the text probably descended into Anna Pole's hands through the Smith family: "John Pole married Rachel Smith of Burlington (New Jersey). I think her Mother was an Edwards-This writing resembles that of Edward Edwards...It is likely this was copied by E. Edwards."

A description of Pennsylvania , circa 1756   [Box 3 F38]

An account of the history of Pennsylvania written in James Bringhurst's hand. See also "Account of New Jersey."

Samuel Stillman, A sermon occasioned by the decease of Mrs. Mary Stillman : who departed this life, March 17. 1768. in Charles-Town, South Carolina. In the 57th year of her age. Preached at Boston, April 17. By her son. [Two lines from Psalms] (Boston : Printed for Phillip Freeman in Union Street). , 1768   [Box 3 F39]

Annotated by unknown: “For James Bringhurst. From the Author who was a cousin of Father Bringhurst's.” Also annotated by Deborah Bringhurst: “For G. V. Moody [George Vernon Moody]” D.B. 11 Mo: 1842”

Copied epistles, testimonies, and letters , 1789-1801   [Box 4 F40]

Quaker writings of Job Scott, Thomas Pole, Elizabeth Coggeshall, Hannah Barnard, Lydia Arnold, Peter Yarnall, Charles Gilbert, and Samuel Bishop.

Commonplace , 1802   [Box 4 F41]

Noteworthy literary passages copied into this commonplace book includes: "A remarkable account of longevity," 1802 ; "Account of a storm in Devonshire," 1638; "A brief account of the death of the late Lord Lyttleton, 1798"; "Events of the French Revolution circa 1789"; "Some account of the salt mines in Poland"; "Particulars relative to the discovery and settlement of that part of North America, now possessed by the United States"; "Some account of Lake Superior in the Western Country"; and "The Planetary and Terrestrial Worlds Comparatively Considered." The book is bound in vellum.

Anna Pole Bringhurst , 1756-1777, undated   [Box 4 F42]

Letter from Anna Pole to an unknown recipient referencing her friend, Robert Fulton (inventor of the first commercial steamship). Copybook of Anna Pole dated 1756. James Bringhurst's account of the death of Anna Pole.

On Hannah Peters Bringhurst and Mary Bringhurst , 1782, 1790   [Box 4 F43]

Hannah Peters Bringhurst (d. 1782) was the second wife of James Bringhurst. This folder contains "A spiritual diary of Hannah Bringhurst, 1781," with a short narration on her last sickness, as well as James Bringhurst's account of the death of his sister Mary dated 1789-1790, which was originally laid in the Hannah Bringhurst book.

Hannah Peters Bringhurst , 1782   [Box 4 F44]

Folder contains two copies of the spiritual diary of Hanna Bringhurst, one labelled as Mary Lawton's copy. Also includes James Bringhurst's account of the death of wife Hannah Peters Bringhurst.

John Eckstein and son, Catalogue of Paintings, Sculptures, andc. (Philadelphia : Printed by Francis Bailey, 1795). , 1795   [Box 4 F45]

Small catalog of paintings, drawings, and sculptures by John Eckstein (1735-1817) and his son Frederick for an exhibition of their work in Philadelphia on the 23rd of March, 1795.

Watchpapers , 1799, 1809   [Box 4 F46]

The eleven watchpapers in this folder were created by James Bringhurst and contain his original poem. Sent to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., in 1809, each was finely hand-copied in miniature script with the intent of inserting into pocket watches to protect the gears from dust. The folder also contains the 1799 wrapping paper from a previous set of watchpapers James sent to his son intended for John Dickinson and his daughter, Sally Norris Dickinson. During that time, James Bringhurst's miniscule writing was "done with a common quill and old cracked spectacles."

Drawings by B. Jacoby , 1788, undated   [Box 4 F47]

B. Jacoby's drawings for Joseph Bringhurst. One illustration contains an annotation by Edward Bringhurst, Sr.: "B. Jacoby was an apprentice in my grandfather (James Bringhurst) hardware store in Philadelphia.-E.B."

Edward Bringhurst (1770-1794) , 1787-1798

Edward Bringhurst (1770-1794) was the sixth child of James Bringhurst (1730-1810) and Anna Pole Bringhurst (1737-1777) and brother of Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. (1767-1834).

Personal , 1787-1791   [Box 4 F48]

Folder contains an invitation to the wedding of Molly Hopkins and Joseph James (relationship to the Bringhursts unknown), an original poem by Edward Bringhurst entitled "Country Life," and a receipt of his for the purchase and tailoring of garments.

Foulke family , 1788-1798   [Box 4 F49]

Folder contains a wedding invitation for Mr. Lawton and Miss Pole (niece of James Bringhurst's wife Anna Pole Bringhurst). Folder also includes a wedding invitation for the 1788 marriage of Dr. John Foulke (son of Judah Foulke and Mary Bringhurst Foulke and cousin to Edward Bringhurst) and Eleanor Parker. Also includes a 1798 note of permission for Elizabeth Foulke (1758-1820), sister of Dr. John Foulke, to travel to meetings in New York and Rhode Island. See Leach, p. 29.

Claypoole family , 1714, undated

The Claypoole family became linked with the Bringhurst family in 1718 with the marriage of John Bringhurst (1691-1750) and Mary Claypoole (1687-1761). Mary was the daughter of Joseph Claypoole and Rebecca Jennings Claypoole and the granddaughter of James Claypoole (1634-1687). James Claypoole was the first of the American Claypooles and purchased five thousand acres of land from William Penn in 1681.

James Claypoole , 1714, undated   [Box 4 F50]

This folder contains multiple documents copied in James Bringhurst's hand: Copy of William Penn's farewell letter, written aboard the ketch Endeavor , on his 1684 return trip to England, addressed to a number of Quakers that included James Bringhurst; copy of extract of a patent for a Quaker burial ground in Philadelphia; extract of a 1683 letter from James Claypoole to William Penn; 1683 extract from George Fox's journal (mentioning James Claypoole); and a copy of a 1679 letter written by James Claypoole to his parents. The folder also contains the original 1714 last will and testament of Francis Cooke (husband of Mary Claypoole Cooke, the daughter of James Claypoole) as well as an undated engraved facsimile of The Death-Warrant of King Charles 1st, printed by Alexander Miller and Company of Liverpool. James Claypoole's eldest brother John Claypoole married Oliver Cromwell's daughter Elizabeth. See also Legal and financial documents of multi-generations-- James Claypoole.

Pole family , 1783-1826

Anna Pole, wife of James Bringhurst, was the daughter of John Pole (1705-1755) and Rachel Smith. John Pole emigrated to America from England just before his marriage to Smith in 1735. Pole was a prosperous merchant with a large estate at Gray's Ferry Road, which his daughter Anna and husband James inherited. Dr. Thomas Pole (1753-1829), son of John Pole and brother of Anna Pole, was a physician (primarily of obstetrics) and Quaker minister. Around 1775, Pole visited relatives in England, traveled extensively to Friends' meetings, and pursued his medical education. He lived in London and Bristol, where he died in 1829. Thomas Pole was also an illustrator of watercolors, sketches, and silhouettes and was a member of the American Philosophical Society (under the leadership of Benjamin Franklin). He also helped to establish schools in England for poor adults, and was a personal friend of British editor and poet James Montgomery.

Correspondence , 1813-1826   [Box 4 F51]

Folder includes catalog of "cuttings and seeds sent to Bristol by John Jackson," written in Deborah Bringhurst's hand; Thomas Pole letters to niece Deborah Bringhurst accompanying a testimonial story entitled, "The Village in the Mountains" (see also Deborah Bringhurst-- The Village in the Mountains). In the letter, Pole referred to his painting of Rockbourn Mill (see also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Legal and financial documents); letters from British editor and poet James Montgomery to Thomas Pole; Eliza Pole's copy of a Bernard Barton poem entitled: "Reflections on Reading a Memoir of Elizabeth Pole"; Deborah Bringhurst's wedding card for the marriage of Thomas Wedmore and Rachel [Pole Duck] Wedmore, granddaughter of Thomas Pole.

Charlotte Rees Lloyd , 1818, undated   [Box 4 F52]

Brief account of Edmund Hatcher, Jr., of Bristol, written by Charlotte Reese Lloyd. Copies of letter to Ellen [surname unknown] and letter to M.D. from Charlotte Reese [Lloyd] made and annotated by Thomas Pole.

Thomas Pole , 1783-1826

Dr. Thomas Pole (1753-1829) was a physician, Quaker minister, and draughtsman. He was the brother of Anna Pole (who married James Bringhurst in 1761). Pole was born in Philadelphia and raised as a member of the Society of Friends. In 1775, he travelled to England and remained there for the majority of his adult life. He became as skilled medical draughtsman and also an illustrator of watercolors, sketches, and silhouettes. Pole was a member of the American Philosophical Society (under the leadership of Benjamin Franklin). As a spirited philanthropist, he help to establish schools in England for poor adults, and published a History of the Origin and Progress of Adult Schools. See also: [silhouettes].

London Quaker Meeting calendar , 1783   [Box 4 F53]

This table lists locations and types of Meetings for worship and discipline “in and about London.”

A Table of Chronology with Historical and Biographical Remarks, 1796   [Box 4 F54]

Broadside written by William Weston Young of Swansea. Contains annotation by unknown writer: "Table of Chronology from T. Pole." Also contains annotation by Thomas Pole: "This was published by our Cousin Wm Weston Young, son of Edwd Young of this City, the upper part to the time of Moses I supplied, the following part he added. T[homas] Pole. Printed by Quaker printers Darton and Harvey.

Lessons on the Fine Arts, 1796-1806, undated   [Box 4 F55]

Folder also contains a variety of prints (engravings) and original art. Three engravings demonstrate the work of illustrator Thomas Pole and others were published in Bristol, Pall Mall, London, circa 1750-1806, undated. These inlcude a print of Pole's depiction of the Jospeh Bringhurst, Jr.'s Rockbourn Mills (See also Folder XX--Pole family--Correspondence and Folder XX--Mary Dickinson Bringhurst--General correspondence) ; Other artists include Thomas Stothard, Martin Engelbrecht, Edward Bird, George Morland, S. C. Jones, and Edward Orme. Also included is an 1806 piece by William Bringhurst--who was probably great-grandson of John and Rosina Prachen Bringhurst (grandfather George Bringhurst 1697-1723, father George Bringhurst 1732-1797) and cousin to Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.

Philanthropy , circa 1814   [Box 4 F56]

Folder includes the pamphlet, For the Restoration of Females who Have Unhappily Fallen From Virtue, which was prepared by a joint council of men and women as a means to help nurture incarcerated women back into society. Dr. Thomas Pole was a member of the men's committee and is listed as a contributor of "James Square." Folder also includes a print (engraving) of "The Bristol School House for the care and instruction of Infants, 1822," bearing the name Joseph Bringhurst.

Account of the deaths of Elizabeth and Amelia Duck , 1821   [Box 4 F57]

This folder contains Pole's account of the 1821 death of his grandchildren, Elizabeth and Amelia Duck, by measles. Elizabeth and Amelia Duck were sisters of Rachel Pole Duck Wedmore.

Joseph Gurney, Lock and Key: passages in the Old Testament which testify of Jesus Christ, explained by others in the New Testament (Bristol : Albion Press, printed by John Wansbrough, 1826). , 1826   [Box 4 F58]

Annotated by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst: “For Joseph Bringhurst from Uncle Thomas Pole.”

Ferris family , 1766-1903

The Ferris family became linked with the Bringhurst family in 1799 with the marriage of Deborah Ferris to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. John Ferris (1710-1751), grandfather of Deborah, married Abigail Tryon in 1737 or 1738. Benjamin Ferris (1780-1867), brother of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst, was a watchmaker, Quaker leader, surveyor, and author of the History of the Original Settlements on the Delaware (1846), the first history of Wilmington, Delaware. For his work, he was posthumously honored in 1902 by the Historical Society of Delaware to commemorate the “services rendered to the state.”

Ferris family tree , 1813   [Box 4 F59]

Original artwork by Deborah Ferris; folder also contains engraving (print), probably of either Benjamin or Ziba Ferris.

John Ferris , 1816   [Box 4 F60]

Hand-drawn copy of "A custom house Cutter in Chase of a smuggler," made by John Ferris, brother of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. A copy of the original illustration is also found in Folder 55--Pole family--Thomas Pole-- Lessons in Fine Arts.

David Ferris , 1779, 1788-1798   [Box 4 F61]

Deborah Ferris Bringhurst's copybook, "A Brief Journal of the Life of David Ferris (1707-1779)." David Ferris was the great-grandfather of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst and a friend to early Willington (Wilmington) settler Thomas Shipley and his wife Elizabeth. It was the Shipley's relocating from Pennsylvania to what would become Wilmington that convinced David Ferris and his wife to move there in 1748.

Memoranda of my father and mother , 1815-1838   [Box 4 F62]

This book was written and bound by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst and details the lives of her parents Ziba Ferris (1743-1794) and Edith Sharpless Ferris (1742-1815). The book also contains letters from Sally Norris Dickinson and Maria Logan, as well as an account of (father) Ziba Ferris's near drowning and resuscitation as a boy.

Ziba Ferris (1743-1794) , 1787-1839   [Box 4 F63]

Ziba Ferris (1743-1794) was Deborah Ferris Bringhurst's father. Ziba Ferris's letters to his sons John and Ziba, his brother-in-law Aron Sharpless, and to John Biddle, annotated by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. One letter to John Ferris on paper with "Brandywine," watermark.

Edith Sharpless Ferris (1742-1815) , 1766-1790   [Box 4 F64]

Commonplace, copybook, and correspondence of Edith Sharpless Ferris (1742-1815).

Sharpless family , 1780-1807   [Box 4 F65]

Furniture maker Ziba Ferris married Edith Sharpless in 1769. (Family name variantly Sharpless, Sharples.) Folder includes: "An account of the sickness and decease of Isaac Sharples…by his sister Deborah Sharples"; testimony of the life of Rebekah Sharpless (1749-1780); "An account of the last illness and expressions of our much beloved Friend Benjamin Sharples"; 1789 plan of New York City with a legend of notable landmarks, annotated to include the residences of Isaac and Aaron Sharpless, the Friends schoolhouse, and other locations; engraving (print) of A Plan of New York Island, Part of Long Island etc. Showing the Position of the American and British Armies, before, at, and after the Engagement on the Heights, August 27th, 1776. printed in 1807; marriage certificate of James Broome and Mary Alexander (grandparents of Edith Sharpless, mother of Deborah Bringhurst) dated 1713 March 5, on vellum; marriage certificate of Benjamin Sharples and Edith Broom (parents of Edith Sharpless, mother of Deborah Bringhurst) dated 1737 February 27, on paper.

Account of Francis Henshaw , 1756   [Box 4 F66]

Copies of excerpts by Francis Henshaw and Thomas Brown created by Edith Sharples.

Benjamin Ferris , 1804-1903   [Box 4 F67]

Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (20 inches).

"Time," a poem by B[enjamin] Ferris; extract of Benjamin Ferris letter to his wife Fanny Canby at Brandywine; "Proceedings of the meeting of the Historical Society of Delaware held on the evening of May 19, 1902, to commemorate the eminent services rendered to the State by Benjamin Ferris the author of " Early Settlements on the Delaware." Folder also includes a photostat copy of family tree created by Benjamin Ferris, printed on paper and mounted on linen. The tree traces the genealogies and intersections of the Levis, Tatnall, Pennock, and Shipley families.

Ferris family correspondence , 1762-1823   [Box 4 F68]

Folder includes: a listing of birthdates of siblings and grandfather compiled by Benjamin Ferris; a poem by Zebulon Ferris, cousin of Ziba Ferris; "A copy of a Letter to a Friend, belonging to Benjamin Ferris, sent to William Mott, 1765"; a letter from William Mott to Benjamin Ferris; a letter to Ziba Ferris from Peter Yarnall; a letter to Edith Ferris from Peter Yarnall; and copies of Ferris family letters created by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. It also contains the annotation of Edward Bringhurst, Jr.: "Peter married Hannah Sharples, a half sister of Edith Ferris who was the wife of Ziba Ferris, the elder."

Subseries II.A.2. Personal papers of Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst family members , 1716-1908
Dr. Joseph Bringhurst (1767-1834) , 1783-1908

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., (1767-1834) was born in Philadelphia, the third of six children of James and Anna Pole Bringhurst. He was educated at Robert Proud’s Latin Friends School in Philadelphia and later studied medicine. As a young man, Bringhurst befriended early American novelist Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810). Together the two participated in a philosophical discussion and debating club, the “Belles Letters Club,” along with lawyer, essayist, philosopher, and poet, William Woods Wilkins (1773-1795). The three intellectuals also later became members of the Society for the Advancement of Useful Knowledge. In 1793 Dr. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., moved to Wilmington, Delaware, where he established his practice at 317 Market Street, comprising his office, drugstore and residence. In 1799 he married Deborah Ferris (1773-1844), daughter of Ziba and Edith Sharpless Ferris. Charles Brockden Brown had also been her suitor. In 1802 Bringhurst was appointed postmaster of Wilmington by President Thomas Jefferson (and was later reappointed by Presidents Madison and Monroe). As a Quaker and pacifist, he later considered resigning from this position during the War of 1812, having been opposed to holding a governmental office during wartime. Some years later, Bringhurst’s medical and postmaster professions were supplemented by his partnership in Rockbourn Mills, the first cotton factory erected in Delaware.

Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst maintained a close friendship with patriot and statesman John Dickinson, his wife Mary "Polly" Norris Dickinson, and their daughters, Sally Norris Dickinson and Maria Mary Dickinson. Joseph Bringhurst was “probably the last man to converse with John Dickinson.” His letter to inform President Jefferson of Dickinson’s death was acknowledged in an 1808 return letter to Bringhurst from the president. The Bringhursts were also closely acquainted with Robert Fulton (1765-1815), inventor of the first commercial steam engine.

Joseph and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst had five children: William Bringhurst (1800-1818), Mary Dickinson Bringhurst (1806-1886), Joseph Bringhurst (1807-1880), Edward Bringhurst (1809-1884), and Ziba Ferris Bringhurst (1812-1836).

Personal , 1791-1822   [Box 4 F69]

Includes letters to Dr. Joseph Bringhurst and other ephemera preserved by Deborah Bringhurst. Also includes a photostat and letter regarding the appointment of Nicholas G. Williamson as successor to Bringhurst as Wilmington's postmaster.

Business ephemera , circa 1800   [Box 4 F70]

Includes advertisement for Joseph Bringhurst Jr.'s store in Wilmington; political cartoon regarding Bringhurst's postmaster position.

Medicine--notes , 1819, undated   [Box 4 F71]

Includes recipe for "Golden ointment for tetter ring-worm," and directions for ingesting other medicines.

Medicine--Samuel Thompson , undated   [Box 4 F72]

Notes and article concerning the American herbalist and botanist Samuel Thompson.

Poetry and notes , 1796-1811    [Box 4 F73]

Poetry created and collected by Joseph Bringhurst. One note indicates Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., spent time in debtor's prison in 1796, by order of Charles [Stantin] in Philadelphia.

Wilkins, William W., letter book , 1791-1792   [Box 4 F74]

William Woods Wilkins (1773-1795) was a lawyer, essayist, philosopher, and poet. As a student Wilkins helped form the debating club, “Belles Letters Club,” with American novelist Charles Brockden Brown and Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and maintained a strong friendship with the latter. Wilkins later became romantically interested in Dolley Payne Todd (then-wife of his law instructor John Todd, Jr.), to whom he gave legal counsel, privately addressing her as “Julia,” and "sister." (Widowed in 1793, Dolley Todd married James Madison in 1794.) In 1790, after completing his law schooling, Wilkins became a member of the Society for the Attainment of Useful Knowledge (later the American Philosophical Society) but soon thereafter resigned to practice law in Woodbury, New Jersey. He died of tuberculosis in 1795 at the age of twenty-two.

This folder includes a poem about William W. Wilkins written by Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. Bringhurst described Wilkins as a “soul torn by anguish,” and a “large spirit,” that “found little joy.” He also wrote that Wilkins, “applied his penetrating mind to knowledge.” The folder also includes a book of copied Wilkins letters, the first of which was addressed to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. In the letter, Wilkins asserted Bringhurst was the only friend who, “had the art of soothing his distress.” Other correspondents include Charles Evans, Sally Pemberton, and John Lawrence, Jr., Esq. The bulk of the letters, however, are impassioned notes and poems addressed to “Caroline.” It is unknown whether this is a second private name given to Dolley Payne Todd; according to Bringhurst, Wilkins found a "source of enjoyment," in courting other women as well. The copied letters to Caroline reference "Julia," and were sent by "Henry," presumably a private name Wilkins gave himself. The copybook also includes a letter to Isaac Payne, brother of Dolley Payne Todd.

Sketch of the life of William W. Wilkins , 1797, 1835   [Box 4 F75]

In 1796, Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., was appointed by the Society for the Attainment of Useful Knowledge to "collect some account of the life of their departed friend William Wood Wilkins." This folder includes Bringhurst's account as copied and annotated by Deborah and a testimonial letter of "gratitude and approbation" from the Society to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., "for undertaking and completing the composition of a work so acceptable..." that "rescue[s] the recollection of the genius and virtues of a name so dear to us all..." According to an annotation by Deborah, Joseph Bringhurst never saw this letter of acknowledgement. Also in her annotations, Deborah Bringhurst commented that the affinity of Wilkins and Joseph Bringhurst had for one another was, "no common friendship," but a "union of minds eminently calculated to feel with exquisite sensibility, all the tenderest and best affections," and that Bringhurst, "named his first son after his departed friend (William Bringhurst, 1800-1818)."

Essays , 1815-1820   [Box 4 F76]

Political and philosophical essays including two regarding "The Missouri Question." Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s stance on the Missouri Question, particularly his opposition to slavery, may have led to his dismissal and replacement as postmaster. See Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Diaries--1819.

Early life of Robert Fulton--Century Magazine , 1908   [Box 4 F77]

Century magazine from 1908 includes an article about Robert Fulton, inventor of the first commercial steamboat and friend to Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst. See related material related to Robert Fulton in FXX (prints--D.B.) and FXX (VIPS)

Newspapers concerning the War of 1812 , 1812-1815   [Box 4 F78]

Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases.

American Watchman and Delaware Republican from 4 July 1812; Delaware Gazette and Peninsula Advertiser from 7 September 1815; National Intelligencer from 5 November 1812, bearing the name S N [Sally Norris] Dickinson; Virginia Argus from 2 June 1812, annotated: "Del. Gazette Wilmington DE, Contains declaration of War 6 Mo 18, 1812."; New York Evening Post from 27 April 1815; National Intelligencer 27 May 1813 bearing the name T J McComb; National Intelligencer from 18 June 1812 bearing the name J Bringhurst; American and Commercial Daily Advertiser from 13 March 1815; National Intelligencer from 25 May 1813 bearing the name T J McComb; and The Democratic Press from 27 March 1813, bearing the name Thos Duff, Jr.

Historical notes and miscellaneous , circa 1775-1801, undated   [Box 4 F79]

Contains Bringhurst's transcription of the inscription on Richard Montgomery's monument, now located on the east side of St. Paul's Church in New York City; announcement of the internment of the late Joshua Gordon Brinckle (1792-1825), Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Delaware; circular calendar for the Nineteenth Century; essay on "The Character of Napoleon," copied in an unknown hand; extract from Dr. Parr's letter on the character of Gilbert Wakefield; document in French concerning "L'eglise Catholique;" account from The Western Star 28 October 1801.

Diaries , 1794-1819

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s diaries were written primarily during his courtship and the early part of his marriage with Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. The final diary leaves a seventeen-year gap in his writing between the years 1802 and 1819 and tells of Bringhurst's professional career as both a partner in Rockbourn Mill and as Wilmington's Postmaster General.

Diary , 1794 October 7   [Box 4 F80]

This diary documents experiences Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., had as a young man, particularly those involving his love interest, Deborah Ferris, and his friends Charles Brockden Brown, and William W. Wilkins (Bringhurst used the nicknames “Laura,” “Romeo,” and “Mercutio,” to refer to the three, respectively). Of note are a few events Bringhurst described in his diary: the dilemma of having interest in Deborah Bringhurst but his “destined to be the wedded companion of another,” who he referred to as “Amelia.” Bringhurst was given a copy of Erasmus Darwin’s The Botanic Garden which he critiqued. He described being on the banks of the Brandywine River with William W. Wilkins when he received a note from “Laura.” Bringhurst praised Charles Brockden Brown’s intellect, “My [friend] Romeo [Charles Brockden Brown] is more of a Geographist than any man whom I have known- He has studied maps with infinite attention, and for a great length of time, and now he feels the utility of his study.”

Diary , 1794 October 27   [Box 4 F81]

Bringhurst described the "Constitution of the Conversation Society," a philosophy club that included both male and female close friends. Charles Brockden Brown played piano-forte for Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., while the latter laid sick in the bed where his brother Edward had recently "taken ill and died"; Bringhurst met (future president) James Madison, Jr., in the company of William Wood Wilkins; at a later date, he visited "B and D Wharton," where various persons sang and played violin, harp, and piano-forte; Bringhurst received letters from "Laura" and regretted the death of his beloved friend William W. Wilkins.

Diary , 1795 April   [Box 4 F82]

Deborah Ferris relayed John Dickinson's opinions about Britain to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.; Bringhurst travelled by carriage with "Laura," and described later "breathing upon her lips"; Bringhurst had been upset with Charles Brockden Brown, and helped brother Jonathan Bringhurst (1769-1818) financially.

Diary , 1795 August   [Box 4 F83]

Bringhurst attended the Pine Street Meeting in Philadelphia; he spent and enjoyed time with “Laura” (Deborah Ferris); he received an invitation to take tea with John Dickinson; and he read the diary of his deceased friend William W. Wilkins.

Diary , 1797 July   [Box 4 F84]

Bringhurst described events such as teaching Ziba Ferris to read and understand geography; Bringhurst explored the Brandywine River with “Laura,” and other friends; he later expressed his wish to marry “Laura”; and worried “Amelia” would not relinquish his hand. Bringhurst also wrote about his drug store on Market Street which was not making sufficient sales. Due to this, the Society of Friends was “resolved to make many difficulties about receiving him.” Bringhurst’s conscience would not allow him to sell whiskey, though it was sold by other Wilmington stores to their success.

Diary , 1798 October, 1801-1802    [Box 4 F85]

Bringhurst described events that included his son William turning five months old; George Logan, in Washington, sent threads of vaccine matter, which was used by Thomas Jefferson; Bringhurst administered a vaccine to William Ferris, son of John; Bringhurst also gave others medical examinations and vaccinations.

Diary , 1819   [Box 4 F86]

Bringhurst described suffering from poor health; he wished to follow the Christian example of his son William, who had died eight months prior; Bringhurst later travelled to Dover, whereby his carriage overturned on a bridge which resulted in bad bruising and a fever; miller and friend Isaac Briggs visited from New York; Bringhurst described young Edward Bringhurst (Sr.) having had a fever and Ziba Ferris (brother of Deborah Bringhurst) having recently lost his son William. Bringhurst also described disapproval of the government’s handling of the “Missouri Territories,” and of Louis McLane’s speech in the National Intelligencer which called for the allowance of slavery in the Arkansas Territory. Other events described in the diary included Deborah Bringhurst having left for Philadelphia to visit Sally Norris Dickinson and later for Burlington, New Jersey, to visit friend Susanna Emlen who was dying of cancer. (Susanna Emlen is variantly referred to as "Susan" throughout the subseries). Bringhurst and his wife later travelled to New York to attend a funeral which extended into a trip to Fishkill in the Catskills to visit the Mattawan Cotton Mill with Robert and Mary Newlin. Bringhurst later expressed dismay that his conduct regarding the Missouri Question and the libel of Louis McLane were the true causes of his dismissal as postmaster. Bringhurst also confronted Delaware Senator Outerbridge Horsey about the latter's having signed a memorandum to the President supporting Bringhurst's removal. Other persons Bringhurst wrote about include Thomas Pole, Victor and E. I. DuPont, Thomas and Mary Garrett, and Elizabeth Coggeshall.

Correspondence , 1796-1838

General correspondence , 1796-1811   [Box 4 F87]

The bulk of this folder consists of letters to Joseph Bringhurst from his father James who wrote from Bristol and Newport, Rhode Island. Other correspondence includes letters from Ann Pole, Samuel Emlen, and a letter from Assistant Postmaster General Abraham Bradley Jr. The correspondence also includes seven copies of an engraving (print) of verses: “The Address of the Carriers of Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser to its Patrons on the Commencement of the Year 1807.” The verses were composed by Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., for the publication. The engravings were sent in an envelope with wax seal with a note by Z (Zachariah) Paulson and an annotation by Deborah Bringhurst.

General correspondence , 1811-1830   [Box 5 F88]

Includes letter from William Allinson, grandson of abolitionist Samuel Allinson; letter from W. J. Duane regarding the War of 1812; letter from Joseph Bringhurst to Benjamin Ferris regarding cotton milling; Stephen Gould letter to Bringhurst regarding will of Bringhurst's stepmother Ruth Barker; 1820 letter from Thomas Pole; correspondence from former senator and Trenton New Jersey Postmaster James J. Wilson exchanging kind words with Bringhurst about the latter's crisis regarding his postmaster position); 1820 letter from cotton miller and abolitionist Isaac Briggs regarding a trip to Washington to protest slavery in the States; letter from Deborah Bringhurst to Joseph Bringhurst describing the failing health of her uncle John; 1828 letter from prominent Unitarian preacher William Ellery Channing of Boston.

Charles Brockden Brown , 1796, undated   [Box 5 F89]

This folder includes an undated letter from Charles Brockden Brown to William W. Wilkins. Brown's letter reflects the self-examination that may have occurred often between he, Wilkins, and other members of the "Belles Lettres Club," in their philosophical debates and discussions. Brown wrote, "Whatever you alledge, alledge with modesty and caution, and as you cannot easily endure contradiction, be sure never to contradict." Also includes a 1796 letter from Charles Brockden Brown to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., referencing Bringhurst's banishment by the Society of Friends and also referring to their mutual love interest "Laura" [Deborah Ferris].

Sarah Sharpless , 1816-1817   [Box 5 F90]

Sarah Sharpless was cousin to Deborah Bringhurst on the side of Bringhurst's mother Edith Sharples. These travel letters from Sarah Sharpless describe her time in Liverpool, Burlington (now Bridleton), and Lichfield, England.

Solomon Bayley , 1830-1838   [Box 5 F91]

Solomon Bayley (also Bailey), was a former slave and author of the 1825 autobiography A Narrative of Some Remarkable Incidents in the Life of Solomon Bayley, Formerly a Slave in the State of Delaware, North America. Bayley's letters to Bringhurst reflected the former's time as a freedman living in Liberia with his wife, probably in partnership with the American Colonization Society, a Quaker-founded society focused on repatriation in Africa. Bayley described the Massacre at "Bassaw" (Bassa) Cove. He also described being accosted by a military officer to be made an active part of a battle, an incident he narrowly escaped on the basis of his pacifist, Christian beliefs. Bayley's exchanges with Bringhurst included letters, lists delineating what items he wanted to purchase, and inventories of purchased goods sent from Liberia. Bayley also knew Benjamin and Ziba Ferris as well as Robert and Hannah Hurnard. (Robert Hurnard also contributed remarks to Bayley's autobiography.) Bayley's letters to Bringhurst described some of his experiences as a slave including his being sent away from his wife and first born child.

Business and legal correspondence , 1813-1827   [Box 5 F92]

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., was an active promoter and partner of the first cotton factory erected in Delaware, the Rockbourn Cotton Mills. The bulk of this folder consists of correspondence concerning cotton and woolen manufacturing which included: letters from William Lehman of Germantown concerning beaming and wrapping machines; orders placed for manufacturing goods such as looms and reels; measurements and accompanying figures for machines; letter from New Jersey Senator James J. Wilson concerning cotton and woolen fabrics; letter from Francis Lowell (namesake of Lowell Massachusetts) responding to a letter of Bringhurst's and discussing the forming of "The Society for the Encouragement of the Cotton Woolen Manufacturers," and his own cotton mill operations; letter from William Granger opposing the War of 1812 and discussing Bringhurst's desire to resign from his government office as Postmaster; letter from William Babson describing a visit to Rio De Janeiro; letter from miller and friend Isaac Briggs, one of the three founders of the Maryland town of Tridelphia, who inquired about the price of cotton machinery; and a copy of an edict by President James Madison to remit the forfeiture of the estate of John and Jane Dauphin.

Letters and legal opinions from Louis McLane , 1815-1825

Letters from attorney Louis McLane to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., regarding the legal case of Sally Norris Dickinson (daughter of John Dickinson) for a real estate claim and other legal matters for the "Bellville property."

Letters and legal opinions from Louis McLane , 1815-1825   [Box 5 F93]

Letters from attorney Louis McLane to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., regarding the legal case of Sally Norris Dickinson (daughter of John Dickinson) for a real estate claim and other legal matters for the "Bellville property." See also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Diaries--1819 (F88).

John Dickinson , circa 1783-1814

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., was a politically engaged and socially active member of post-Revolutionary American society. Most notably, he was an intimate friend of fellow Quaker and prominent Revolution-era figure John Dickinson. Bringhurst was a frequent correspondent of Dickinson’s, and the two often exchanged observations on the state of the burgeoning American nation and the political and social positions of the Society of Friends. More information regarding the relationship between Bringhurst and Dickinson can be found in this University of Delaware Library Special Collections guide: http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/guides/jefferson/

Admission ticket , undated   [Box 5 F94]

Engraved admission ticket for Bowen's Phenix [sic] Museum (formerly Bowen's Columbian Museum of Boston, Massachusetts) for "John Dickinson Esq and Lady."

Visiting card , circa 1783   [Box 5 F94]

Visiting card of "Gen. Kosciuszko," (Polish military leader Tadeusz Kościuszko). Annotated by Deborah Bringhurst: "The great Pole. He left this card at J Dickinson's then President of Pennsylvania about the year 1783. A memento of him and his writing."

Visiting card , circa 1783   [Box 5 F94]

Visiting card of "The Chevalier [John] Paul Jones" (mariner and American Revolutionary War officer). Annotated by Deborah Bringhurst: "… of noted memory as a warrior, left this Card at J. Dickinson's then President of Pennsylvania-about the year 1783."

Invitation , undated   [Box 5 F94]

Engraved and handwritten invitation: "The Minister of France presents his compliments to his Excellency Gr. Dickinson and requests the favour of his company at Dinner on Monday next, at 5 o'clock, to celebrate the King's birthday. Answer if you please."

Envelope , undated   [Box 5 F94]

Envelope bearing note made by Edward Bringhurst, Jr. "Card of Invitation from the French Minister to Govr John Dickinson to dinner to celebrate the Kings birthday."

Copy of 1802 letter to James Bringhurst , 1814   [Box 5 F94]

On the subjects of happiness and prosperity. Copied by Deborah Bringhurst in 1814.

Letter to Joseph Shipley, Sr. , circa 1793   [Box 5 F94]

Dickinson wrote to Shipley regarding pending the former's departure for Dover and regarding Charles François Dumouriez's turning against the French National Convention during the French Revolution.

Letter to Deborah Bringhurst , 1793, 1799   [Box 5 F94]

Dickinson wrote to Deborah Bringhurst asking her to purchase "two cheeses," that he had recently favored, as available. Annotated by Deborah Bringhurst: "This Note was written by my dear friend J Dickinson when his left hand was near mortification by the bite of gray Squirrel."

Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Bringhurst , 1808   [Box 5 F94]

Jefferson wrote to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., acknowledging the receipt of Bringhurst's letter which had informed him of John Dickinson's death. On Dickinson, Jefferson wrote: "A more estimable man, or truer patriot could not have left us. Among the first of the advocates for the rights of his country when assailed by Great Britain, he continued to the last the orthodox advocate of the true principles of our new government, and his name will be consecrated in history as one of the great worthies of the revolution."

Letter to Joseph Bringhurst , undated   [Box 5 F94]

Dickinson wrote to Bringhurst relating a dream of Dickinson's involving Ziba Ferris (father of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst).

Letter to Deborah Ferris and Joseph Bringhurst , 1799   [Box 5 F94]

From John and Mary Dickinson accepting a social invitation.

Letter to James Bringhurst , 1799   [Box 5 F94]

Regarding James Bringhurst's relocation to Rhode Island from Philadelphia.

Letter to Joseph Bringhurst , 1806   [Box 5 F94]

Congratulating Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst on the birth of their daughter, Mary Dickinson Bringhurst. Also includes photostat copy of letter.

Copy of letter fragment , undated   [Box 5 F94]

Fragment photostat copy of letter from James Bringhurst to unknown recipient regarding John Dickinson.

Notable correspondents

This folder contains correspondence between Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and distinguished early Americans including United States founding father Thomas Jefferson, engineer and inventor Robert Fulton, and statesman Henry Clay.

Note from Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1803 June 17   [Box 5 F95]

From Washington: “Th. Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Bringhurst and takes the liberty of putting the enclosed under his special cover to avoid the false commentaries by which his friendly correspondence with Mr. Rodney has been so much misconstrued." On wrapper: 1842 annotation by Deborah Bringhurst regarding the confidence Jefferson placed in Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.’s integrity.

Letter from Robert Fulton , 1811 January 23   [Box 5 F95]

Fulton wrote Bringhurst regarding the work of John Stevens, another steam power industrialist who pioneered work in both steamships and steam locomotives. Fulton wrote that Stevens was “a very respectable and honorable gentleman…” Fulton also claimed to have influenced Stevens’s design: “[He] finally by my consent has adopted my leading principles, with some little variation in the combinations, on which plan his boat on the Delaware is built and runs very well.” Fulton also wrote that he had ceded to Stevens the “unrivaled run on the Delaware and Chesapeake,” though Fulton and his partner Robert Livingston maintained a monopoly in New York.

Letter from Robert Fulton , 1811 March 14   [Box 5 F95]

Fulton wrote Joseph Bringhurst Jr., from New York to indicate Mr. Barlow (patriot and poet Joel Barlow) was to sail in the frigate Congress and could be of service to Bringhurst’s friend “Bauduy” (probably Pierre de Bauduy de Bellevue, an early partner of E. I. DuPont). Fulton also wrote about an attempt to destroy the reputation of Barlow in print, which Fulton called “shameful falsehoods invented and circulated for political purposes to destroy his influence and utility.” Fulton also mentioned the work of steam power industrialist John Stevens.

Letter from Robert Fulton , 1813 August 27   [Box 5 F95]

Robert Fulton wrote Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., from New York in regard to Fulton's concession of trade territory to fellow steamship industrialist John Stevens. Fulton was concerned with the development of American steamship infrastructure, concerned with "all waters from Quebec to Mexico," and wished "America to say that she has the most perfect water communication on this globe."

Letter from Henry Clay , 1820 May 13   [Box 5 F95]

Henry Clay wrote Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., acknowledging a specimen of cotton thread and a "cravat [neckpiece] of cotton cloth." Clay responded to Bringhurst's call for protection of domestic manufacturing protections: "Such fabrics are very encouraging to the friends of Domestic manufactures and I am glad that you think, under adequate protection, more and more perfection will be attained."

Deborah Ferris Bringhurst , 1781-1882

Deborah Ferris (1773-1844) was born in Wilmington, Delaware, to furniture maker Ziba Ferris (1743-1794) and his wife Edith Sharpless Ferris (1742-1815). Deborah Ferris was cousin to Mary Sharpless, who married Delaware abolitionist Thomas Garrett (1789-1871). She was also lifelong friend of Sally Norris Dickinson, daughter of patriot and statesman John Dickinson. “Debby” Ferris was courted by both Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and early American novelist Charles Brockden Brown, but eventually married Bringhurst in 1799. As a devout Hicksite Quaker, she was both an opponent of slavery and an avid copyist of religious writing. She was also an ardent diarist, collector of family keepsakes, and annotator of family letters and diaries. Joseph and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst had five children: William Bringhurst (1800-1818), Mary Dickinson Bringhurst (1806-1886), Joseph Bringhurst (1807-1880), Edward Bringhurst (1809-1884), and Ziba Ferris Bringhurst (1812-1836). Deborah Ferris Bringhurst died in 1844 and was buried at the Friends Meeting House Burial Ground in Wilmington, Delaware.

Poetry , 1789-1795, undated   [Box 5 F96]

Poetry collected and recopied by Deborah Bringhurst. Poets include William Cowper, Esq., James Montgomery, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Hannah Griffiths (cousin to Bringhurst acquaintance Mary Norris), Sarah Lynes Grubb, and Quaker poet Thomas Wilkinson. Deborah Bringhurst's uncle (by marriage) Thomas Pole's correspondence with poet James Montgomery can be found in: Pole family--Thomas Pole--Correspondence--1813-1826 (F55).

Drawings , undated   [Box 5 F97]

Drawings, watercolors, and cut-paper work created both by and for Deborah Bringhurst. One piece of artwork was created on a bag probably used to ship tea labeled, "Padre Souchong." Also includes a coloring of a print by William Bringhurst (either Deborah Bringhurst's son or cousin).

"Ornaments of my doll's house" , 1783   [Box 5 F98]

Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (20 inches).

Drawn and painted by Deborah Bringhurst at the age of ten, "done before the close of the revolutionary war." Bringhurst stated: "The only paints I had were a little vermillion and a Prussian Blue, which I mixed up with Gum Arabic water."

Collected visual works , 1783-1825, undated Items removed to SPEC MSS oversized boxes (20 inches).

Mary Belson My Brother engraving , 19 May 1812   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraved folding frontispiece; 30 x 24 cm. This engraving by early 19th-century children's author Mary Belson (Elliott, 1794?-1870) most likely belonged to Mary Dickinson Bringhurst.

Original portrait of James Nayler by unknown artist , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : Gouache, pencil, and ink on paper, matted on wood; 18 x 25.5 cm. English Quaker leader James Nayler (1617-1660) was an arrested on charges of blasphemy after a 1656 dramatic entrance into Bristol that recalled the biblical entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem. He suffered the brutal punishment of the piercing of his tongue by hot iron and a branding of "B" on his forehead, in addition to public disgrace and imprisonment.

Redd, T. (publisher) Portrait of George Fox (engraving) , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraving; 22 x 31 cm. "Founder of the Society of Friends. Great Newport Street. London." George Fox (1624-1691) was a leader of the Quaker movement and founder of the Society of Friends.

Branwhite, N. Portrait of Richard Reynolds (engraving) , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraving; 29 x 44 cm. "Engraved by H. Meyer from the Original Picture by N. Branwhite in the Possession of the Family. Published 1 March 1817 by N. Branswhite Queen Square Bristol. Engraving of Richard Reynolds." Quaker Richard Reynolds (1735-1816) was an iron merchant in Briston, England.

Bringhurst, William W., Untitled sketch , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pencil and ink on paper; 23 x 33 cm.

Untitled sketch , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pencil and ink; 17 x 19 cm.

Heald, Henry, profile portrait of Ziba Ferris Bringhurst , 1825   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pencil on paper; 18 x 24 cm. Annotated by Deborah Bringhurst: “Designed for a likeness of Z. F. B. [Ziba Ferris Bringhurst] when about 13 or 14. Sketched by Henry Heald. He was tutor to my dear Son."

Untitled portrait sketch , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pastel on paper; 17 x 18 cm. Untitled portrait of unknown subject.

Profile portrait of unknown , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pastel on paper; 15 x 18 cm.

Profile portrait of unknown , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pastel on paper; 20 x 22 cm.

Two silhouettes , undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pencil on paper; 33 x 41 cm.

Killey, S., silhouettes and sketches , 17 June 1798   [Box 5 F99]

Art original : pencil on paper; 34 x 42 cm.

Darly, Mary, The Vis A Vis Bisected or The Ladies Coop engraving , 25 May 1776   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraving; 38 x 25 cm. Husband and wife Matthew and Mary Darly were English printsellers and caricaturists in the 1770s. Mary Darly was an engraver and author of A Book of caricaturas, circa 1762.

Fulton, Robert La Blanchiseuse engraving , 1783, undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraving; 28 x 36 cm.

Fulton, Robert deArne engraving , 1783, undated   [Box 5 F99]

Art print : engraving; 36 x 28 cm.

Clippings (1 of 2) , 1825, undated   [Box 5 F100]

Clippings of poetry and humor from The London Paper, The Nantucket Inquirer, The Belfast Commercial Chronicle and other unknown publications.

Clippings (2 of 2) , 1803-1816, undated   [Box 5 F101]

This folder contains various clippings that include Daily National Intelligencer from 13 March 1816 which includes a reprinting of Isaac Briggs's letter to the Hon. William Lowndes, chairman of the "Committee of Ways and Means" of the House of Representatives comparing American and British manufacturing. Briggs was a fellow cotton miller and friend of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. See also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Business and legal correspondence--1813-1827. Other clippings include two items concerning Lord Lyttleton's "extraordinary vision and death" from Philadelphia Repository and Weekly Register and The Brighton Gleaner.

Notes and scraps , 1799-1840   [Box 5 F102]

Includes small excerpts from Deborah Bringhurst's diary which include small prayers and entries about her family members.

Memorandums and recipes , 1807-1843   [Box 5 F103]

Includes recipes for blue and green paint. Includes an "imperfect recipe" for dying purple by T. Garrett (abolitionist Thomas Garrett). Also includes recipe by cousin Sarah Sharpless.

Memorandum book , 1812-1840   [Box 5 F104]

This book of memorandums by Deborah Ferris Bringhurst contains a list of books Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody sent to Edward Bringhurst, Jr.; a reproduction of an 1812 letter from Granger to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. regarding his resignation from his position as postmaster (See also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Business and legal correspondence--1813-1827, F94), a copy of a memorandum made by Deborah Bringhurst in 1821, and an 1840 memorandum and copy of a 1789 letter from Isaac Sharpless.

Commonplace (copy book) , 1801-1839   [Box 5 F105]

Notebook sold to Bringhurst by Wilson's on Market Street in Wilmington. Deborah Bringhurst copied excerpts from newspapers and elsewhere and added her own notes. This includes an obituary and commentary for Deborah Norris Logan, wife of early United States Senator Dr. George Logan and cousin to Mary Norris Dickinson, wife of John Dickinson. See also Deborah Ferris Bringhurst--Deborah Logan--"Memoir of Charles Thomson."

Personal , 1801-1851   [Box 5 F106]

Includes a small sewing needle case, wrapping paper, notes and memorandums of Deborah Bringhurst, including a note from Benjamin Ferris.

Genealogical notes , 1834-1882   [Box 5 F107]

Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (20 inches).

Contains an account of an ailing Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., in a weakened state for three weeks; account of Joseph Bringhurst's ailments 1829-1834 which escalated in severity in 1834, the year of his death; a short history and genealogy of Thomas Shipley; memorandum by Deborah about important births and deaths in her life which references Dr. George Logan, Sally Norris Dickinson, and Sarah Sharpless; account of the early American life of Claypoole; Bringhurst coat of arms; account of the lives of James Broome and Mary Alexander, great-grandparents of Deborah Bringhurst. Includes a genealogical chart of the descendants of James Bringhurst (1730-1810) and Anna Pole Bringhurst (1737-1777), annotated by Deborah Bringhurst and modified, probably by Edward Bringhurst, Jr., to include more recent family members at a later, unknown date. The chart chiefly illustrates the descendants James Bringhurst (brother of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.) and wife Rachel Bettle Bringhurst.

Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocate, 1830 October 23   [Box 5 F108]

Newspaper bearing the name "Sally Norris Dickinson," daughter of John Dickinson and close friend of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. The Cherokee Phoenix newspaper was the first newspaper published by Native Americans in the United States. It was renamed Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocate in 1829. The paper was the first American paper published in a Native American language. Deborah Bringhurst annotated one copy: “Preserved as an evidence of the wonderful Genius of one of that oppressed People, who invented Characters to designate their thoughts in their own language. A specimen of the Indian type may be seen in the first column of the first page.”

Deborah Logan--"Memoir of Charles Thomson" , 1823, 1841   [Box 5 F109]

Two copies of "Brief memoir of Charles Thomson," written by Deborah Logan, both copies likely made by Deborah Bringhurst. See also Deborah Ferris Bringhurst--Copybook--1801-1839. Charles Thomson (1729-1824) was taken into the seminary of Dr. Francis Alison of New London, Pennsylvania, as a boy. (Alison was headmaster of the Newark Academy which would later merge with New Ark College to become the University of Delaware.) Thomson went on to lead a Friends academy in New Castle, Delaware, eventually became the Secretary of the First Continental Congress, and was called by John Adams, "the Samuel Adams of Philadelphia." Thomson also designed the Great Seal of the United States. Deborah Logan's memoir states that Thomson was educated during the same period as Thomas McKean and George Read of Delaware under Francis Alison. Logan also explained Thomson's friendship with Benjamin Franklin, his early opposition to the Stamp Act, and his account of the solemn mood of Philadelphia on the day of the Declaration of Independence.

Death accounts and religious letters , 1781-1840   [Box 5 F110]

Includes accounts of the deaths of Hannah Yarnal, Catherine Jackson, and Mary Norris Dickinson, wife of John Dickinson; "Expressions uttered in a Sermon by George Dillwyn a short time before he sailed for England in 1793 copied by Molly Field for Deborah Ferris;" four newspaper clippings concerning death and spirituality; an account of freed slave spirituality shortly after emancipation in Jamaica; and Mary Pemberton's testimony concerning her deceased daughter Mary Jordan.

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1798-1834   [Box 5 F111]

Deborah Bringhurst's account and notes regarding the increase in debility and the last sickness of her husband Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., who probably suffered a series of strokes. She wrote, "He spoke with pleasure of meeting his own dear father." The folder includes an 1834 obituary of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and notes by Deborah regarding his passing.

Brief extract from the "Monthly Magazine", 1821   [Box 5 F112]

Copied materials include, "A Brief Extract from the Monthly Magazine," a "Letter from Jane Harry to her Father," a letter from "Anna Seward to James Boswell relating a conversation between Doctor Johnson and Mary Knowles respecting Jane Harry," and other short extracts.

Notes regarding Elias Hicks , 1823-1833   [Box 5 F113]

Elias Hicks (1748-1830) was a Quaker leader associated with the first separation in the Religious Society of Friends in Philadelphia in 1827-1828. The folder contains a letter by Orthodox branch Quakers John W. Tatum and Rachel Bullock denouncing Deborah Bringhurst as a member of their Society, annotated (and defended) by both Deborah Bringhurst and Edward Bringhurst, Jr. The folder also contains a larger group of documents regarding Elias Hicks, including extracts from yearly meetings and copied Hicks letters. Followers of Elias Hicks were known as Hicksites.

Fenelon, archbishop of Cambray; with some account of his life. Religious pieces. Pious reflections for every day of the month, White-house, near New-Brunswick, N.J., Printed and published by William Elliot, sold in New-York by T. and J. Swords; and in New-Brunswick by Robert Eastburn, sen. circa 1810 , circa 1810   [Box 5 F114]

Theophilus R Gates. A view of the last dispensation of light that will be in the world : taking into consideration its certainty, its effects upon mankind, and the time when this light will be dispensed (Philadelphia [Pa.] : Printed for the author by Joseph Rakestraw, 1814. , 1814   [Box 5 F115]

Broadsides , 1815   [Box 5 F116]

This folder includes six copies of a broadside extracted from the Religious Rememberancer a weekly publication, printed in Philadelphia. The excerpt concerns the "Dukhobertsy," a Christian Cossack sect that was exiled from Russia. One copy is annotated by Deborah Bringhurst and another is annotated by M. T. B., probably Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965).

Augustus Applegath;  Edward Cowper (Great Britain) The Village in the Mountains London : Religious Tract Society : and sold by J. Davis, 56, Paternoster-row : and J. Nisbet, 15, Castle-street, Oxford-street, (London : printed by Augustus Applegath and Edward Cowper) Copy No. 174. , circa 1820   [Box 5 F117]

Printed by Edward Cowper, improver of the steam printing engine. For additional information on The Village in the Mountains, see also Pole family--Correspondence.

Commonplace , circa 1786-1839   [Box 5 F118]

Deborah Bringhurst commenced writing this book at the age of twelve. It includes Prayers, sonnets, psalms, proverbs, information on Madiera wine, and clippings including an excerpt of John Quincy Adams' criticism of phrenology.

Journal-Meditation entries , 1791-1792   [Box 5 F119]

Journal entries of Deborah Ferris (Bringhurst), written at eighteen years of age. She wrote of spending time at her uncle W. Poole's at Brandywine and also with "Sally" (probably Sally Norris Dickinson). She also wrote of taking up George Fox's journal. The journal entries also contains a copied extract of a letter to "R Biddle." Two letters from Ziba Ferris, one bearing a note "favoured by G[unning] Bedford." One letter from John Field to "Debby Ferris."

Diaries , 1798-1836

Diary , 1798   [Box 5 F120]

Deborah Ferris wrote about having met and dined with John Dickinson and his daughters Sally and Maria Dickinson. She described not wanting to marry outside of the Friends. Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., had recently "lost his right in Society," and could not be reinstated until his debts were settled (see also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Correspondence--Charles Brockden Brown.) She described meetings of the Delaware and Wyandock Native American tribes meeting with the Wilmington Quakers. She also later met with John Dickinson who discussed with her the estates of his daughters Sally and Maria. It was intended for Sally to receive the Pennsylvania portion of his estate and for Maria to receive the Delaware portion.

Diary , 1799   [Box 5 F121]

Deborah Ferris Bringhurst, recently married, accompanied Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., to his home, which became her new dwelling. She later cleaned the house with a servant, Rachel Cheesely, age ten, who was indebted to her mother, Edith Sharpless Ferris. Other family and friends that Bringhurst described interacting with include Sally and Joseph Sharpless, Peggy and Fanny Canby, brother Benjamin Ferris, and Rebecca Yarnall. She also discussed meeting her father-in-law (James Bringhurst) for the first time as a married woman. The diary ends with a transcript of a theological discussion Deborah Bringhurst had with Nathan Hunt on the nature of heaven.

Memoranda , 1816   [Box 5 F122]

Deborah Bringhurst described visits with Sarah Sharpless, Margaret Smith, Samuel and Susanna Emlen, cousin (and abolitionist) Thomas Garrett, Isaac Sharpless, C and M Jefferis, brother Ziba Ferris, and Sally Norris Dickinson. She also wrote about prominent Quaker Elias Hicks attending her local Meeting, describing him as the "George Fox of the present day." In addition, she wrote that her husband "set off for Dover on abolition business."

Memorandums of trivial occurrences and passing events , 1816   [Box 5 F123]

Deborah Bringhurst wrote of steamboat excursions and taking dinner and tea with friends in various locales. These included Thomas Garrett, Sally Norris Dickinson, Sally Sharpless, and Elizabeth Megear, who married Ziba Ferris Bringhurst in November of 1816. Other memorandums of Deborah Bringhurst include her account of a horse and carriage accident that took place at Painter's Crossing on the road home from Concord (now PA/DE Route 202). The horse, having stumbled, threw her son Ziba Ferris Bringhurst (age 4) from the carriage and nearly threw her son Edward Bringhurst (age 7). The younger boy narrowly escaped being run over by the carriage and received minor scrapes on his temple and face.

Diary , 1819 July   [Box 5 F124]

The Bringhursts travelled to New York via Burlington, New Jersey, and visited with Samuel and Susan Emlen (who had taken serious illness). At least part of the family then visited Long Island and later, the Fishkill mountains on the Hudson. Deborah Bringhurst described visiting the Matteawan Cotton Factory with Robert and Mary Newlin. See also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Diaries--1819. She later described experiences with preacher Theophilus R. Gates and Richard and Hannah Hurnard from England.

Diary , 1821 March   [Box 5 F125]

Deborah Bringhurst described her having travelled to Philadelphia, the Arch Street Quaker Meeting, and having dined with Thomas and Mary Garrett. She discussed having met and admired Theophilius R. Gates, who had recently edited of the periodical entitled, "The Reformer." Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., had recently taken "a partner in the cotton spinning business" (Jacob Alrichs). Regarding the mill, she wrote of the "Great exertions to set the wheels of Rockbourn in motion," and the trials of managing both a drug store and mill. She described how she and her husband had hoped their first son William could have been a part of the business (William Bringhurst died in 1818). She also wrote about Uncle Thomas Pole having sent artwork from Bristol, which included drawings of James Square and his home, and later, his having fallen ill and paralytic.

Diary , 1834-1836   [Box 5 F126]

This diary includes accounts by Deborah Bringhurst as new grandmother to Samuel Shipley (son of Edward Bringhurst, Sr., and Sarah Shipley Bringhurst) and also to William "Willie" Bringhurst (son of Ziba Ferris Bringhurst and Amy Dixon Bringhurst). She later wrote of young Samuel's death as well as the death of her husband, Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., who died 1834 July 26. Deborah Bringhurst wrote having seen Friends Philip and Betsey Thomas, Maria D. Logan, Clement and Mary Biddle, and Nathan Sharples. She wrote of her daughter Mary Dickinson Bringhurst (approximately age 28) having moved out of their family home to the home of Edward Bringhurst, Sr. She also wrote about the last will and testament of "Father James Bringhurst," regarding the division of his plantation among his heirs.

Pocket almanacs , 1797-1843

Almanacs, such as Poor Will's almanack, Pennsylvania pocket remembrancer, and Merchant's pocket remembrancer were regionally published books containing calendars, lists the names of regional and national government officials, and astronomical information such as the phases of the moon. They also served as notepads for keeping memorandums. Deborah Bringhurst annotated these almanacs with information such as Quaker meeting attendance, the birth and death dates of relatives and friends, recipes and home remedies, records of storms, illnesses, and accounting information.

Bailey's Pocket Almanac, for the year of our Lord, MDCCXCVII; And of the Empire the twenty first., 1797-1798   [Box 6 F127]

Printed by Francis and Robert Bailey, at Yorick's Head, No. 116, High Street, Philadelphia. This almanac served as a ledger and a list of sewing material purchases made by Deborah Bringhurst. She also described the social visits of Uncle Peter Yarnall, Mary Sharpless of New York, Jane Hoylan, Catherine Melus, and Samuel Emlen. The almanac also contains instructions for creating home remedies inluding a "comfort powder," to cure inflammation.

Untitled almanac , 1802   [Box 6 F128]

This unidentifed almanac is missing the title page and contains only one entry by Deborah Bringhurst: "10 mo 1802. The Yellow Fever was very bad at this time."

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1803; Being the seventh after Bissextile or Leap-Year, 1803   [Box 6 F129]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst's entries included descriptions of bitter cold and violent storms of 1803. The almanac also includes descriptions of meeting with Sally Sharpless, Sarah and Owen Biddle, and Rebecca Owen Thompson. Bringhurst also wrote of remembering her "maternal friend" Mary Dickinson, wife of John Dickinson.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1805; being first after Leap-Year., 1805   [Box 6 F130]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. This almanac contains a home remedy for whooping cough, and recipes for quieting (or composing) pills, and cretaceous powder (for stomach ailments). Bringhurst also described meeting with Sally Sharpless and Samuel Emlen and riding to Milltown Delaware by horse and sleigh.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1810; being the second after Leap-Year., 1810   [Box 6 F131]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. Bringhurst wrote of the death of James Bringhurst, father of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., at the age of eighty in Portsmouth, Rhode Island as well as the death of friend Sally Sharpless. The almanac also contains mention of Edward (Bringhurst, Sr.) as an infant.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1811; being the third after Leap-Year., 1811   [Box 6 F132]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. This almanac contains brief listings of Bringhurst travel events which included Joseph Bringhurst travelling to Philadelphia by boat, Deborah Bringhurst riding to Concord and Milltown, and also her trip to Kensington with Sally Norris Dickinson (daughter of John Dickinson) via Cooper's Ferry. The booklet also served as a ledger for textile repairs that Deborah Bringhurst performed for friends a family, including spinning cotton, weaving, whitening fabric, boiling yarn, and spinning flax.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1812; Being Bissextile or Leap-Year., 1812   [Box 6 F133]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. Almanac includes recipe for currant jelly as well as "Pococks Pickle," for pickling meat. Deborah Bringhurst noted that war was declared by the Senate and House of Representatives against Britain. She also described time with Sister Edith Ferris Harlan, Sally Norris Dickinson, Anne Sharpless, Susanna Horne, Mary Allinson, Caleb Shreve, and T. R. Gates (probably preacher Theophilus R. Gates).

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1813; Being the first after Leap-Year., 1813   [Box 6 F134]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. This almanac contains a ledger as well as additional recipes for "Pococks Pickle," and currant jelly. Deborah Bringhurst also described time with Anna Sharples, Maria Johnson, Sally Norris Dickinson, Isaac Briggs, Edward Stabler, Susan Emlen, cousins Lydia and Joshua Sharpless, brother Benjamin Ferris, brother Ziba Ferris, and Caleb Harlan.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1814; Being the second after Leap-Year., 1814   [Box 6 F135]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. This almanac contains a lock Edward Bringhurst, Sr.'s (age 5) hair laid in, as well as a caricature created by Deborah Bringhurst, possibly of herself. Bringhurst described an event where her son Joseph Bringhurst (1807-1880) was run over by a horse and sleigh and dragged but came away unhurt. She also wrote about her time with Isaac Briggs, Sally Norris Dickinson, Maria Logan (second daughter of John and Mary Dickinson), Ziba Ferris, Margaret Sharpless, Theophilus R. Gates, and Clement Biddle.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1815; Being the third after Leap-Year., 1814-1815   [Box 6 F136]

Printed and sold by J. Crukshank, No. 87, High Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst wrote of the death of her mother Edith Ferris, and of visits with Isaac Briggs, Thomas Garrett, cousin Margaret Sharpless, and Clement Biddle. She also wrote about the allies entering Paris, the "dethroning of Boneparte," and his removal to the island of Elba. Laid into this almanac are a pressed leaf and a thread specimens.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1817; Being the first after Leap-Year., 1817   [Box 6 F137]

Published by Solomon and Conrad, No. 87 High Street, Philadelphia. Bringhurst described social visits with cousin and abolitionist Thomas Garrett, Sally Norris Dickinson, Hannah Briggs, and cousins Isaac and Sarah Sharpless. She noted that brother Benjamin Ferris removed from his house on the Brandywine to a "House on the Hill."

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1823; Being the third after Leap-Year., 1823   [Box 6 F138]

Published by Kimber and Sharpless : No 8. South Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst wrote of social visits with James Mott, brother Ziba Ferris and his wife Eliza, Susan Emlen, Maria D. Logan, and Sally Norris Dickinson. She also wrote of an explosion at Bauduy's Powder Mills (Peter Bauduy was an early partner of industrialist E. I. DuPont). See related material in FXX--Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody--Correspondence--Thomas Megear.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1826; Being the second after Bissextile or Leap Year., 1826   [Box 6 F139]

Published by Kimber and Sharpless : No 8. South Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst described her son Ziba Ferris Bringhurst resigning to become a cabinet maker (though he later learned the machinery for spinning wool and cotton and worked for Jacob Alrich, Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s partner in the Rockbourn Cotton Mill). She noted the deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. Bringhurt also wrote of being visited by Solomon Bailey (also spelled Bayley, see also), Sally Norris Dickinson, and Rebecca Embree. See related material in FXX--Joseph Bringhurst--Correspondence--Solomon Bayley.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1830., 1830   [Box 6 F140]

Published by Kimber and Sharpless : No 8. South Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst wrote that she received a letter from Rachel Duck informing her of the passing of her uncle, Thomas Pole. She later noted the death of prominent Quaker minister Elias Hicks. She also described the various afflictions of Sally Norris Dickinson, Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and prominent Philadelphia lawyer Eli K. Price (whom Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., cared for in illness). Additionally, Deborah Bringhurst wrote of son Edward Bringhurst, Sr., first opening his drug store in Wilmington the same year.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1831., 1831   [Box 6 F141]

Published by Kimber and Sharpless : No 8. South Fourth Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst wrote of social visits with Benjamin Ferris, Hannah Briggs, James Stabler, Sally Norris Dickinson, Thomas Megear, Rebecca Embree, Samuel Emlen, Charles Townsend, and William and Samuel Canby. She wrote of the deaths of her nephew Benjamin Ferris (Jr.), and of friend Edward Stabler. The almanac also includes a laid in clipping of Stabler's obituary.

Poor Will's Pocket Almanack for the year 1833., 1833-1834   [Box 6 F142]

Published by Uriah Hunt, No. 19, North Third Street, Philadelphia. Deborah Bringhurst wrote of Solomon Bailey's (also spelled Bayley) visit with the Bringhurst family from Liberia. She described Sally Norris Dickinson's health as "poor with rheumation," and described Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s "seizing" and "spasming." (Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., probably underwent a series of strokes and died in July 1834). Deborah Bringhurst also described visits with Isaac Briggs, Isaac Parrish, Rebecca Embree, Sally Norris Dickinson, Maria Logan, and William [Linn] Brown, son of early American novelist Charles Brockden Brown.

Wallet , 1816   [Box 6 F143]

Leather trifold wallet of Deborah Bringhurst. One of her annotations indicates her ancestry's arrival in Wilmington: "Grandfather John Ferris remov'd to Wilmington in the year 1748. Died 1750."

Bioren's Pennsylvania Pocket Remembrancer for the year 1816; And of the Republic the Forty-First., 1816   [Box 6 F144]

Philadelphia : Printed and sold by John Bioren, No. 88, Chestnut Street. Deborah Bringhurst described social visits with Susan Whitehead, Sally Norris Dickinson, Edith Sharpless, Thomas Garrett, Hannah Briggs, William Stabler, William Dillwyn and Samuel Emlen. She also described her brother Ziba Ferris "laying down his intention of marriage" before the yearly meeting (Ziba Ferris married Elizabeth Megear 1816 November 14).

Bioren's Pennsylvania Pocket Remembrancer for the year 1818; And of the Republic the Forty-Third., 1818   [Box 6 F145]

Philadelphia : Printed and sold by John Bioren, No. 88, Chestnut Street. This almanac includes an additional recipe for "Pocock's Pickle," instructions for making a "Spice Plaister" (a soothing poultice) for infants, and a remedy for tetter (a skin disorder). Deborah Bringhurst wrote of the deaths of Jonathan and James Bringhurst, brothers of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. She also wrote of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., travelling to Dover "on abolition business."

Merchant's pocket remembrancer; for the year 1835., 1835   [Box 6 F146]

Printed by Uriah Hunt, No. 101, Market Street, Philadelphia. Deboroh Bringhurst wrote of a memoir of William Wood Wilkins having been sent to her. She also wrote of visits with neice Edith Harlan, and friends Rebecca Embree, Clement Biddle, and Francis and Mary Ann Fowler.

Friends' Pocket Almanac; for the year 1838., 1838-1839   [Box 6 F147]

Contains annotation by Deborah Bringhurst: "and Memorandums for 1839." Published by T. E. Chapman, No. 74, North Fourth street. This almanac contains the address of Eli K. Price, prominent Philadelphia lawyer. Deborah Bringhurst described the whaling ships, Lucy Ann , Ceres , and North America arriving and leaving the port of Wilmington. She also wrote of a great flood on the Brandywine River which swept away a bridge and caused harm to Rockbourn Mills. The almanac also includes mention of George Vernon Moody, Benjamin Ferris, Sally Norris Dickinson, and Maria D. Logan.

Friends' Pocket Almanac for the year of our Lord 1840, being bissextile or Leap Year., 1840   [Box 6 F148]

Published by T. E. Chapman, No. 74, North Fourth street. Deborah Bringhurst wrote of a fire on Shipley Street which burned the roof of the Bringhurst home. She also wrote of her sons travelling to Baltimore to confirm the nomination of William H. Harrison as president. Bringhurst also recalled friend "Gideon Seaman," whom she lodged with in Long Island, New York on her trip to the yearly meeting of 1791. See related material in FXX-- Deborah Bringhurst--Correspondence--Ziba and Edith Ferris.

Friends' Pocket Almanac, for the year 1841, first after leap year., 1841   [Box 6 F149]

Published by T. E. Chapman, No. 74, North Fourth street. Bringhurst wrote of Joseph Shipley, who called to take leave. She also described daughter Mary Dickinson Bringhurst having gone to spend the winter in Port Gibson, Mississippi.

Friends' Pocket Almanac, for the year 1842, second after leap year., 1842   [Box 6 F150]

Published by T. E. Chapman, No. 74, North Fourth street. Bringhurst wrote of the death of family attorney Peter Thompson and her removal to a new house on Shipley Street. She described brother Benjamin Ferris giving her a lithograph copy of "Penn's Treaty with the Indians." She also noted that Mary Dickinson and George Vernon Moody returned will after a seven month absence and were engaged to be married later that year.

Friends' Pocket Almanac, for the year 1844, containing an account of the times of holding the yearly, quartlerly, and monthly meetings of Friends, on the continent of America., 1844   [Box 6 F151]

Published by T. E. Chapman, No. 74, North Fourth street. Deborah Bringhurst noted visiting with Lucretia Mott, Rachel Jackson, Maria D. Logan, brother Benjamin Ferris, daughter Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody, cousins "T and R" Garrett, and "sister Shipley."

John Ferris homemade pocket almanac , 1843-1844   [Box 6 F152]

Contains annotation by Deborah Bringhurst: "This little Book was Bound by my dear brother John Ferris when a boy about 12 years old. He gave it to me. It has been long useless, and the Pocket Almanacks now to be purchased have so little paper for memorandums of passing events that I shall use it for that purpose."

Correspondence , 1785-1844

Ziba and Edith Ferris , 1789-1794   [Box 6 F153]

In 1791, at the age of eighteen, Deborah Ferris traveled to Westbury, New York, with prominent Friend Samuel Emlen to attend the yearly meeting there and was very impressed by the Friends she met. The bulk of her correspondence with parents Ziba Ferris (1743-1794) and Edith Sharples Ferris (1742-1815) are written at this time of Deborah's young adulthood. It is clear that at this time she was acquainted with Edward Bringhurst (1770-1794), the brother of her future husband, Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. Her correspondence mentioned notable figures of John Dickinson, Owen and Clement Biddle, Sally Norris Dickinson, and Charles Brockden Brown. Deborah also frequently doted on her younger brothers Ziba and Benjamin. Later correspondence included mention of the 1793 yellow fever outbreak in Philadelphia.

Siblings John, Benjamin, and Edith Ferris , 1791-1805   [Box 6 F154]

Correspondence includes: 1791 letter from brother John Ferris telling of various ailments of the Ferris family, including the "hooping cough" that was "spreading through town"; 1794 John Ferris letter to Deborah Bringhurst in Philadelphia stating: "Mother desired though would be particular in sending word down here respecting the Fever--it is reported here that it certainly exists in Philadelphia"; 1794 letter from John Ferris, who, in the company of Clement Biddle, stayed with the New Jersey Biddle family on their travel home from fall Friends meeting in New York; 1799 invitation to Anne and Clement Biddle for dinner with humorous addendum by Benjamin Ferris; Ziba Ferris's first effort at letter writing in 1794 at the age of eight; letter to sister Edith (Ferris) Harlan referring to sister Fanny (Canby) Ferris and Sally Norris Dickinson.

General correspondence (1 of 2) , 1785-1819   [Box 6 F155]

Includes a letter from Deborah Ferris, age twelve, to Patty Potts. Other correspondents include A. Bayard, Hannah Cathrall, Sarah "Sally" Williams, Isaac Sharples, Susan [Susanna] Emlen, Peter and Rebecca Owen Thompson, Mary McElwee, Susan Whitehead, Uncle Thomas Pole, Lydia P. Mott, Rebecca Embree, and second cousin Joseph Allcott.

General correspondence (2 of 2) , 1820-1844   [Box 6 F156]

Letters from Rebecca Embree, who wrote on the health of Sally Norris Dickinson and Sarah Sharpless and referenced Samuel Emlen visiting Thomas Garrett. In 1822, Embree also wrote about the illness and near-death of Elizabeth Foulke; 1822 Hannah Hurnard letter referencing the Colchester Anti-Slavery Society and the "veteran Clarkson" [Thomas Clarkson, founding member of the society]; letter from cousin Deborah Freehart; 1832 invitation to Deborah Bringhurst to have tea with Sarah Shipley and Edward Bringhurst [Sr.]; letter regarding Edward Catthrall's will and the Haverford Estate, and the last surviving trustee of John Pole; sympathy letter from Deborah Ferris Bringhurst to John Keating on the death of his daughter; letter from Joseph Tallcot, second cousin to Deborah Ferris Bringhurst and grandson of great aunt Hannah Ferris.

Letters from Hannah Hurnard , 1824-1834   [Box 6 F157]

Hannah Hurnard and her husband Robert were esteemed friends of the Bringhursts. They either returned or permanently moved to Kelvedon in Essex, England, circa 1824 to claim an estate. Hannah Hurnard described two transatlantic voyages in her letters to Deborah Bringhurst, on both the Electra and the Atlantic . The Hurnards knew Deborah Bringhurst’s Uncle Thomas Pole, and reported the details of his death to the Bringhursts in 1834. Another mutual acquaintance of the families was former slave Solomon Bayley (see also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Correspondence--Solomon Bayley, F93). Many of Hannah Hurnard’s letters contain ornate wax seals.

Letters from Lydia P. Mott , 1828, 1838   [Box 6 F158]

This folder contains two extracts of letters from prominent Quaker Lydia P. Mott to Deborah Bringhurst and Benjamin Ferris which were later wrapped in a letter from Anna Bringhurst (probably Anna wife of Joseph Bringhurst, 1807-1880). Lydia Philadelphia Stansbury was an Episcopalian who later received membership in the Society of Friends after marrying Quaker Robert Mott. Her conversion to Quakerism greatly allayed the reservations of Mott's father James, with whom Lydia later developed a strong relationship. Lydia P. Mott became a committed member of New York's Quaker community and a member of the Association of Women Friends for the Relief of the Poor. With Mott's help, the Association opened the first free, sectarian school in New York City for the education of poor children. Mott wrote to Bringhurst and Ferris on a visit to Philadelphia where she attended the 1828 Orthodox Yearly Meeting and sojourned with father-in-law James (who resided on Front Street between Market and Arch Streets). Her correspondence alluded to incidents that occurred on 22 and 24 April, 1828, when she was disciplined at the Yearly Meeting for assertively preaching the Gospel. Mott indicated gratitude to Deborah Bringhurst's sympathetic replies to these events. Mott also wrote about a trip to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and requested that Joseph Bringhurst send medicinal supplies.

Children of Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst , 1813-1837

Letters from Bringhurst children , 1813-1828   [Box 6 F159]

First letter of Mary D. Bringhurst (1806-1886). Early letters of Edward Bringhurst, Sr. (1808-1884), Ziba Ferris Bringhurst (1812-1836), Joseph Bringhurst (1807-1880), and William Bringhurst (1800-1818) as young children. Letters from Edward Bringhurst, Sr., contain a "Brandywine," watermark.

Letters to her children , 1819-1837   [Box 6 F160]

Account of the death of a family cat, "Puss," which includes an original poem Deborah wrote to console son Ziba. Letters to Edward and Mary D. Bringhurst; 1837 letter referenced grandson Edward Bringhurst, Jr., then at age two.

Mementos of son William , 1812-1818   [Box 6 F161]

William Bringhurst, the eldest son of Joseph and Deborah Bringhurst, died at the age of 18 in 1818. Folder contains memoriam poem by Deborah, specimens of William's writing, and William's clipping of H.H. Brackenridge's "Epistle to Walter Scott," from Freeman's Journal, published 9 September 1811.

On the death of her son Ziba Ferris Bringhurst , 1836   [Box 6 F162]

Folder contains Deborah Bringhurst's account of the death of her son Ziba Ferris Bringhurst and an 1836 inventory of the goods and chattels of Ziba Ferris Bringhurst.

Edward Bringhurst, Sr. (as a child) , 1814-1871

Edward Bringhurst, Sr. (1809-1884) was the fourth of five children born to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. Though he received little formal education, Edward Bringhurst, Sr.'s folder is indicative of his scholarship and work as a child and young man in arithmetic, geometry, geography, and sketch artistry. Bringhurst’s studentship most likely coincided with his apprenticing in his father’s drug business until 1830, when at age twenty-one he established his own trade in medicine. An extended biographical note regarding Edward Bringhurst, Sr., as an adult is located in folder XX.

Illustrations , undated   [Box 6 F163]

Child's sketch of a cottage and print engraving of lamb with note in Deborah Ferris Bringhurst's hand: "Edward Bringhurst from his friend EM[J]"

Geography notes , undated   [Box 6 F164]

Young man's geography notebook. Includes definition of "Geography," description of a "Terraqueous Globe," and demographical information on the countries of Europe.

Sketches , 1814-1828   [Box 6 F165]

Seven illustrations/colored prints by Edward Bringhurst, Sr. as a young man. Includes a sketch of a dog on paper with watermark: "Brandywine."

Unknown author, "Little Histories : The bad effects of telling lies" , circa 1820   [Box 6 F166]

Chapbook for children by J. Kendrew, Colliergate, major publisher of chapbooks and toy books

Exercise book , 1820   [Box 6 F167]

Edward Bringhurst's book of exercises in mathematics at age eleven. Bringhurst signed the book six times, practicing various forms of his signature.

Exercise book , 1822   [Box 6 F168]

Edward Bringhurst's book of exercises in foreign exchange mathematics at age thirteen.

Copy book and scrapbook , 1824, 1871   [Box 6 F169]

Contains embossed seal: "EH Van Reed, Berks Co Pennsylvania." Includes 1871 obituaries of Ferris Bringhurst pasted into cover. Also includes laid-in 1824 sketch by Edward Bringhurst, Sr.

Exercise book , 1826   [Box 6 F170]

Edward Bringhurst's book of exercises in geometry at age seventeen.

Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody , 1716-1864

Mary Dickinson Bringhurst (1806-1886) was the second child and only daughter of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. In 1842 she married George Vernon Moody (1816-1876), originally of Portland, Maine. The two relocated to Port Gibson, Mississippi, where George Vernon Moody established a law practice. For reasons unknown, but possibly due to her husband's southern sympathies, Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody was soon after disowned by the Delaware Quakers. In the early years of their marriage, the couple had two children that both died in infancy. At the onset of the American Civil War, George Vernon Moody became captain of a Confederate company of Louisiana volunteers and later saw action in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Chattenooga. It is clear that Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody's social ties to family and friends in the North were affected by her husband's Confederate stance. George Vernon Moody was imprisoned twice during the war and its aftermath, first at Fort Delaware after he was captured behind Union lines, and later at Fort McHenry, after he was apprehended as part of an escort to the Jefferson and Varina Davis family. After her husband's death in 1876, Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody returned to live with her family in Wilmington, Delaware.

Copybook , undated   [Box 6 F171]

Copybook contains poems by Nathanial Parker Willis (1806-1867), English historian Henry Hart Milman (1791-1868), L. E. L. (possibly Lydia Lancaster) and excerpts from Bishop Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765).

George Burder and John Bunyan, Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s progress versified : for the entertainment and instruction of youth (Burlington [N.J.] : Stephen C. Ustick, 1807). , 1807   [Box 6 F172]

Annotated by unknown person: "Belonging to: Anne Sharpless presented by her dear uncle Joseph Sharples, 10 of 7 mo, 1808,” and "This later belonged to Mary Dickinson Bringhurst."

W. Derham, Physico-theology; or, A demonstration of the being and attributes of God, from His works of creation. (London : W. Innys and J. Richardson, 1716). , 1716   [Box 7 F173]

Annotated by unknown person: "Joshua Crosby’s book. Joseph Bringhurst. George V. Moody 1847" Hand-bound.

Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) Your best friend London (56 Paternoster Row, 164 Piccadilly) : The Religious Tract Society, circa 1859 , circa 1859   [Box 7 F174]

Marriage certificate and legal documents , 1820-1843   [Box 7 F175]

Discharge of trustee H. Hoopes in the trust estate of Mary Moody in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas; State of Ohio, Hamilton County marriage certificate for George V. Moody and Mary D. Bringhurst; sketch of Mary Moody's house "in or near New Orleans Louisiana," with 1940 annotation by Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers.

Confederate paper money and loan certificate , 1861-1864   [Box 7 F176]

This folder contains three bills of the Confederate States of America of one, ten, and twenty dollar amounts all printed 1864 February 17. Printers included two Confederate currency lithography partnerships in South Carolina: Evans & Cogswell and Keatinge & Ball. The folder also contains a twenty five cent paper bill of the State of North Carolina, printed 1861 October 1 in Raliegh by J. Spelman, public printer for the treasury. Also included is an engraved Confederate States of America loan certificate for one hundred dollars at four percent interest, printed 1863 March 23.

Delaware and other political ephemera , circa 1860s   [Box 7 F177]

Folder includes a political “nursery rhyme” regarding Delaware politics which notes the Delaware "Copperheads," and an advertisement for “Johnson’s assortment of Union songs.”

Correspondence , 1817-1864

General correspondence , 1817, 1864   [Box 7 F178]

1840 invitation to Mary D. Bringhurst by Thomas and Mary M. Ellicott; 1817 letter by Uncle Thomas Pole telling of his sending of a "drawing of Rockbourn Mills," 1830 letter from Ziba Ferris Bringhurst regarding a portrait of Mary Dickinson Bringhurst; 1861 letter by Mary Dickinson Moody relating "A remarkable latter day prophecy," regarding the vision of John Hoag which foretold of the American Civil War; 1864 letter from Lindly Smyth of Philadelphia to Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody, declining the latter's company for dinner on account of being on opposing sides of the American Civil War (Mary Dickinson Bringhurst had married George Vernon Moody (1816-1876), a Confederate of Port Gibson, Mississippi). See also Pole family--Thomas Pole.

Letters from Thomas J. Megear , 1822-1823   [Box 7 F179]

Thomas Jefferson Megear (1809-1878) was the brother of Elizabeth Megear Ferris (1797-1880) who married Ziba Ferris (1786-1875, brother of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst) in 1816. The bulk of Thomas Jefferson Megear's letters to Mary Bringhurst were written at age fourteen while studying at the West Town Boarding School (now the Westtown School), a Friends school in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The bulk of letters described Megear's daily experiences at school, and an 1823 letter described an explosion nearby Bauduy mills.

Letters from Evelina Denny (Cummins) , 1831-1833   [Box 7 F180]

Evelina Maria Denny (1808-1896), friend of Mary Dickinson Bringhurst and daughter of William and Ann Denny of Kent County, Delaware, married George Wilson Cummins, Col., (1808-1891) in 1837. George Wilson Cummins learned the mercantile trade from his father and ran a successful trade, shipping grain and other goods to major North Eastern cities. He later served as state representative for Kent County in 1856-1857. The bulk of Evelina Denny's letters were sent from Little Creek, Willingbrook, and Woodlawn, all located in what is now Smyrna, Delaware. The letters reflect the lives of Denny and Mary Dickinson Bringhurst as friends and young women. Denny asked frequently about Bringhurst's suitors and also wrote of her rejection of Joseph Bringhurst's (1807-1880) courtship and proposal to marry. Denny wrote about other topics such as reading poet James Gates Percival, a "pleasant visit among the DuPonts" with boat rides along the Brandywine, and the 1832 arrival of Bringhurst cousins from England.

Joseph Bringhurst III (1807-1880) , 1812-1851

Joseph Bringhurst III (1807-1880) was the fourth child of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. He married Anna Richardson in 1842.

Mary Belson My Father engraving , 17 February 1812   [Box 7 F181]

Removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (17 inches).

Art print : engraved folding frontispiece; 30 x 24 cm. Contains annotation by Deborah Bringhurst: “Joseph Bringhurst 3rd 1812 10 mo.” See related Belson artwork in Deborah Ferris Bringhurst--Collected visual materials.

Documents , 1841-1851   [Box 7 F182]

1841 broker's account for railroad stock; 1844 sale of railroad stock; 1851 promissory note from Mary Moore to Joseph Bringhurst for four hundred dollars.

Subseries II.A.3. Legal and financial records of multi-generations , 1713-1870

Accounts, records of goods shipped, receipts, estate records, and miscellaneous other generational family documents.

John Bringhurst (1690-1750) , 1750

John Bringhurst will , 1750   [Box 7 F183]

Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (17 inches).

Folder contains original and copy of last will and testament of John Bringhurst (1691-1750), the former containing a wax seal. Also includes notes by Mary Thomas Bringhurst made in the twentieth century: "I think this John B is a brother of James Bringhurst who was born 1730, died 1810"; excerpt from a journey from Philadelphia to Calcutta by unknown, which contains a recipe for invisible ink; 1791 copy of citation to Joseph and James Bringhurst regarding the estate of John Bringhurst (1722-1789).

John Bringhurst, Jr. (1722-1789) , 1789-1792

Accounts of the estate of John Bringhurst with Joseph Bringhurst (1 of 2) , 1789-1792   [Box 7 F184]

Also includes article of agreement between Joseph and James Bringhurst, executors and Samuel Jacobs. Paper in this account ledger contains watermark: "M & ET."

Accounts of the estate of John Bringhurst with Joseph Bringhurst (2 of 2) , 1789-1792   [Box 7 F185]

Contains short genealogical note by Edward Bringhurst, Jr. Signed by Joseph, John, Jonathan, William, and Edward Bringhurst.

Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. (1722-1811) , 1713-1811

Lesson book , 1752   [Box 7 F186]

Lesson book of Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. at age twenty for vulgar fractions and stereometry.

Record of goods shipped , 1749-1811   [Box 7 F187]

Folder contains record of goods shipped by Joseph Bringhurst and Co. The booklet is wrapped in the front page of The American Weekly Mercury, 24 April 1735. The record contains a log of the voyages undertaken and the sales and delivery of those goods shipped to Antigua, Jamaica, Halifax, Nantucket, and Eustatia. Goods included soap, salt petered gammons, flour, beeswax, sugar, and limes. Freight and portage costs are also listed. Some of the transactions included Elizabeth Claypoole, Mary Foulke, James Bringhurst, and Joseph Bringhurst.

Day books , 1761-1808   [Box 7 F188]

Two day books (1761-1804, 1761-1808) used in Joseph Bringhurst's bookkeeping as a merchant. The books contain numerous transactions with Robert Wharton who later became the mayor of Philadelphia. Also included are multiple transactions with members of the Bringhurst and Foulke families, memoranda regarding estate transactions, as well as a list of voyages to Antigua, Dominica, Montserrat, and Halifax. Items laid into the day books include receipts, an engraving: "Anthy. Finley's Bookstore," and numerous maple leaves.

Thomas Mercer accounting rules , undated   [Box 7 F189]

Thomas Mercer, active 1692, developed accounting rules as a guide to balancing ledgers. This folder contains Joseph Bringhurst, Sr.'s, hand copies of Mercer's Directing him to Find the Proper Debtors and Creditors usual Transactions and Occurances [sic] of Trade With the Method of Balancing Accounts and Transferring them into a New Leidger [sic] which was printed in 1697. The wrapping for Bringhurst's copies is made of paper imprinted with flowers and a watermark "J C and Co Brandywine."

Receipts and cost of house and goods on Front Street [Philadelphia] , 1769-1806, undated   [Box 7 F190]

Contains receipts for sundry provisions including pipes of wine, Bibles, cords of hickory and oak, silk, and silver watch. Some of these items were shipped by Joseph Bringhurst and Co., including fifty-one barrels of flour shipped to Mungo Davidson in 1775. The folder also contains receipts for paving, health, dock, city, poor, county, and hospital taxes. In addition, there is an undated inventory for the "Cost of my lot of ground and house in Front Street," [Philadelphia] which lists building supplies and labor costs.

Receipt book , 1769-1808   [Box 7 F191]

Bound receipt book for the sale of items in Philadelphia. Contains signature of Charles Wharton of the Wharton family, a prominent mercantile Quaker family living in Philadelphia at the time. Many of the receipts are for payments of city and county taxes and the receipts list the various names of the collectors, the most of frequent of which is Jacob Hull.

Executor estate of Deborah Claypoole and other Claypoole documents , 1729-1785   [Box 7 F192]

Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., was the grandnephew of George and Deborah Claypoole on the side of his mother, Mary Claypoole Bringhurst. Deborah Claypoole named Joseph Bringhurst, Sr. the executor of her will (which also included the estate of her merchant husband, George Claypoole, and the estate of her deceased son, Abraham Claypoole). Folder includes copy of the last will and testament of George Claypoole, last will and testament of Deborah Claypoole, (with wax seal and copy), last will and testament of Abraham Claypoole, inventory and distribution of Deborah Claypoole property, copy of the settlement of the estate of Deborah Claypoole, consent of the late Deborah Claypoole's residuary devisors for the sale of her dwelling house; appointment of Joseph Bringhurst, Sr., as executor of Deborah Claypoole's will (due to the infirmity of the other executor, Joseph Morris; an account of money belonging to the estate of George Claypoole; an indenture between merchant Abraham Claypoole and his mother Deborah Claypoole, the will of James Claypoole, a leaf from the estate of George Claypoole to Deborah Claypoole, and two leafs from the estate of Abraham Claypoole.

Accounts Deborah, Abraham, and George Claypoole , 1713-1751   [Box 7 F193]

Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases.

Contains Abraham Claypoole's memorandums of cash lent at sundry times; copy of Abraham Claypoole's account from Deborah Claypoole's books; bond of George Fitzwater to Deborah Claypoole; 1744 indenture from merchant Abraham Claypoole to mother Deborah Claypoole; 1713 copy of 1686 last will and testament of James Claypoole; undated leaf from the estate of George Claypoole to Deborah Claypoole; two leaves from estate of Abraham Claypoole.

Accounts and receipts relative to the estate of Deborah Claypoole , 1785-1810   [Box 7 F194]

Bound account book of Joseph Bringhurst, executor to the estate of Deborah Claypoole. Recipients include Elizabeth Booth, Mary Foulke, Martha Mifflin, Rebecca Wharton, Elizabeth Foulke, and others. Also includes an inventory and appraisement of the goods, rights, and chattels belonging to the estate of Deborah Claypoole, appraised by Samuel and Sarah Lewis in 1785. Also contains extract of Deborah Claypoole's obituary from the Pennsylvania Mercury and Universal Advertiser.

James Bringhurst , 1751-1813

Receipts and documents , 1770-1794   [Box 7 F195]

Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases.

Documents pertaining to land exchanges in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, including a bond warrant between James Bringhurst, James Gillingham, and John Follwell; two 1774 receipts, received of James Bringhurst and Thomas Crossan for five hundred acres of land of Edmund Phipick; and two documents signed by Gunning Bedford: a "Memorandum of Discovery of Vacant Land," which includes 1775 agreement between James Bringhurst, Gunning Bedford, and Thomas James (also includes a map of the area discussed), and 1776 agreement granting land to James Bringhurst in Bedford County. See related materials in James Bringhurst--Correspondence--1764-1808.

Regarding Esther Bowen , 1789   [Box 7 F196]

Items removed to SPECC MSS oversize boxes (17 inches).

Wrapper in Deborah Bringhurst's hand: "Papers relating to the Plantation in East Whiteland Township in Chester County," written on Sir William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England; exemplification of mortgage from John Smith to Esther Bowen for two parcels (130 acres) of land in East Whiteland Township, bounded by land of John Jacobs, land of the heirs of Samuel Burg, and land belonging to Thomas Bowen; 1789 loan note for the Bank of North America from Thomas Willing and Tench Francis to John Bringhurst to pay Esther Bowen.

Estate documents (1 of 2) , 1788-1796   [Box 7 F197]

Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases and boxes (18 inches).

1788 exemplification of 1688 deed poll from Richard Russell to Jose Kerle, for "bank lot houses wharfes and all its improvements" (with watermark and wax seal); 1776 bond and warrant of attorney from James Lees to James Stephens executor (with watermark and wax seal); 1795 agreement between James Bringhurst and George Fudge regarding a water course between their properties on Union and Second Streets, Philadelphia; 1810 memorandum of deeds and papers concerning the bank lot of James Bringhurst. This memorandum list regressively traces Bringhurst's land to the original 1684 land patent from William Penn to John Wheeler for a "thirty foot lott on the East side of Front Street, extending 250 into the Delaware [River]"; 1780 deed from James Bringhurst and wife Hannah to Robert Allison, carpenter. For three lots in the district of Southwark in the County of Philadelphia. On vellum with seals.; paper wrapping for legal documents of James Bringhurst estate.

Estate documents (2 of 2) , 1807-1813   [Box 7 F198]

These documents pertain to James Bringhurst's estate for a frame house in Passyunk Township in Philadelphia County. Bringhurst died before he could complete the conveyance of the property to Augustine Bosquet. Folder contains wrapper for: "Letters and Papers relating to the Frame House and Lot in Passyunk sold to Bosquet"; note referencing Frame House and Gray Line; 1807 note regarding Frame House situated on the Great Road leading from Philadelphia to Grays Ferry; note regarding deed from John C. Evans and Joseph Bringhurst acting executors to James Bringhurst for August[ine] Bosquet" (Evans and Bringhurst, as executors to James Bringhurst were authorized to make and deliver a good deed for the property for Bosquet); Letter to John Hallwell, Esq., from Joseph A. Mc [Kinsey] from Harrisburg regarding documents to be obtained by the [Pennsylvania] State Senate; note from John Hollowell, Esq.; petition and description regarding James Bringhurst estate.

Legal documents Pole family , 1782-1805   [Box 7 F199]

Inventory of legal documents, written on scrap paper; 1782 account of the last sickness of Hannah Peters; agreement between Edward and Mary Pole and James Bringhurst granting certain premises in the County of Philadelphia, written on a piece of an engraved advertisement for Edward Pole's grocery store; draught of a tract of land divided between Daniel Dupree and Jacob Weise (adjacent to William Shipley land); 1776 deed from Ann Pole to James Bringhurst for nineteen acres of a plantation on Lower Ferry Road in Passyunk Township (now part of Philadelphia); 1805 account of Ann Pole's personal estate; See also James Bringhurst--Deeds--Passyunk property.

Deeds , 1761-1802
Philadelphia property , 1761, 1789

Richard Russell "shipwright," to Jeremiah Elsreth, "blacksmith" , 1789   [Box 7 F200]

1789 exemplification of a 1690 deed. For a brick house in Philadelphia on the bank of the Delaware River.

John Bringhurst, Mary Bringhurst Foulke, Elizabeth Bringhurst, and Joseph Bringhurst to James Bringhurst. , 1761   [Box 7 F200]

For property on the east side of Front Street between Walnut and Spruce Streets, Philadelphia. On vellum with seals.

Passyunk property , 1751-1788

Edward Pole, wife Mary, and Ann Pole to James Bringhurst , 1788   [Box 7 F201]

For two parcels of land in the township of Passyunk in the County of Philadelphia. Both parcels were formerly owned by Francis Many who sold them to John Pole in 1749 and 1753 transactions. These were then inherited by Thomas Pole and Anna Pole (Bringhurst), wife of James Bringhurst.

Thomas Pole, surgeon to James Bringhurst, ironmonger , 1783   [Box 7 F201]

For dwelling house and land in Passyunk Township on the road leading to Gray's Ferry deriving from the estate of John Pole.

Francis Many, sailmaker, and wife Margaret to John Pole, merchant. , 1753   [Box 7 F201]

For acreage in Passyunk Township in Philadelphia County. On vellum with seals.

Charles Merideth, shopkeeper, to Francis Many, sailmaker. , 1751   [Box 7 F201]

For land in Passyunk Township, in Philadelphia County. This deed also cites land of Daniel Duprey and Jacob Weise. On vellum with seals.

Wilmington property , 1786-1802

James Smith, Jr., merchant and wife Esther to James Bringhurst , 1802   [Box 7 F202]

For property on Market Street bordering High Street in Wilmington, Delaware. The property purchased in this transaction is the same land as the 1795 transaction of Isaac Gregg and wife Sidney to James Smith, Jr. On vellum, with seals. Signed by Philadelphia mayor Matthew Lawler.

Isaac Gregg and wife Sidney to James Smith, Jr. , 1795   [Box 7 F202]

For property bordering the areas of "widow Springer," and "Harvey lot," (of Job and Sarah Harvey) with a small expansion into the alley backing up to Robert Phillips mansion house. On vellum and paper, with seals. This deed was signed by Thomas McKean, delegate to the first and second meetings of the Continental Congress and signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Robert Phillips, shopkeeper, and wife Ann to Isaac Gregg, silversmith , 1786   [Box 7 F202]

For property on Market Street backing to High Street. The property on Market Street described in this deed can be regressively traced to William and Elizabeth Shipley and Timothy Stedham, three of Willington's (Wilmington’s) earliest residents. Shipley property was sold to Stedham in 1738, and then to Edward Dawes in 1748, which included an expansion of the property and the building of new dwelling houses. The Dawes family also obtained adjacent property of Benjamin Johnson in 1746. All of the described property was purchased by Robert Phillips in 1773, who sold it to Isaac Gregg in this 1786 deed. The deed also mentions the “widow Springer,” who was most likely descended from Charles Springer, another early Wilmington settler.

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1787-1834

Peter Thompson legal correspondence , 1799, 1817   [Box 7 F203]

Letter from attorney Peter Thompson regarding a prenuptial deed of settlement he had prepared for Bringhurst. Thompson also offered legal advice and well wishes regarding Bringhurst's approaching marriage to Deborah Ferris. As Thompson indicated, the marriage settlement was written to keep the couple's finances separate while protecting Deborah Ferris Bringhurst's dower in the event that she should outlive her husband. Folder also contains two additional letters related to trusts.

Deed of trust (prenuptial agreement) , 1799 July 8   [Box 7 F204]

Folder consists of a tripartite deed between Deborah Ferris, mother Edith Ferris, brother Benjamin Ferris, and Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. This agreement ensured that after marriage, the mother and brother of Deborah Ferris (Bringhurst) would remain trustees of her estate (presumably to bar any of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s creditors from laying claim to her belongings). The settlement also ensured Deborah would not be barred from her rights and title to the estate of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., in the event she outlived her husband. The indenture also includes a list of household goods and furniture belonging to Deborah Ferris (Bringhurst).

Marriage certificate , 11 November 1799   [Box 7 F205]

Marriage certificate of Joseph Bringhurst Jr. and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. Witnessed by John Dickinson, his daughters Sally Norris and Maria Dickinson and members of the Canby, Sharpless, Biddle, and Ferris families. Also contains 1896 annotation by Edward Bringhurst Jr.: "My grandmother Deborah Bringhurst died when I was nearly 9 years old. I remember her distinctly--she entertained my brother and myself with my cousins William and Margaret Bringhurst with her recollections of the British occupation of Wilmington in 1777 and heard the cannon at the Battle of Brandywine. Of the signers to this I remember Isaac Dixon, Nathaniel Richards, Benjamin Ferris, Maria Dickinson who married Albanus Logan, Sally Norris Dickinson. Benjamin Ferris was the last survivor he died in 1867 -Edward Bringhurst, son of Edward and Sarah Bringhurst." 12 mo 7th 1896

Accounts for the estate of Ziba Ferris , 1803-1808   [Box 7 F206]

This folder contains a bound volume relating to the estate of Ziba Ferris, of which his son-in-law Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. was executor. Recipients of the estate included Edith Ferris, Sarah Shipley, Thomas Brown, Benjamin Springer, John Tripp, Robert Shipley, and others. The volume includes memorandums, account notes, and a lease of two-story brick house on Shipley Street from Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., to Chester Buckley. The volume was bound by J. Wilson, "bookbinder, bookseller, and stationer in Wilmington, Delaware."

Last will and testament , 1834   [Box 7 F207]

Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.'s, last will and testament named Ziba Ferris Bringhurst as executor. The document indicates the Bringhursts owned property in three locations in Wilmington, Delaware, and that Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., held stock in the Wilmington and New Jersey Steamboat Company. The document is signed by David Smyth and Benjamin Ferris as witnesses.

Receipts , 1804-1811   [Box 7 F208]

Folder includes receipts for materials and work done in repairing Bringhurst's Water Street store, receipts relating to the funeral and internment of Elizabeth Booth, receipts from accounts with John Evans, Bringhurst's personal receipts, scraps, and blotting paper.

Legal documents , 1787-1834   [Box 7 F209]

Folder includes: financial memorandums; an agreement between Bringhurst and Edward Garrigues to raise the height of the former's stores on Water Street; an indenture leasing land in Brandywine Hundred belonging to Sally Norris Dickinson to Benjamin Elliot; document relating to James Bringhurst's property in Bedford County, Pennsylvania (see related material in Legal--James Bringhurst--Receipts and documents); building surveys; a bond between James Johnson and William Hemphill (see also Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Deeds); legal document appointing Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., as attorney for Peter Thompson, signed by Robert Wharton, mayor of Philadelphia; an appointment of Joseph Bringhurst III as attorney for Deborah Bringhurst; and an 1816 license to John Thorp for a loom patent.

Agreement--Benjamin Ferris , 1815, 1822   [Box 7 F210]

Folder contains three items: document containing signatures of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. and Benjamin Ferris, both signing for the firm Bringhurst and Ferris; agreement by Benjamin Ferris not to become bound as a security without the knowledge and consent of Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and Jacob Alrichs; document dissolving the firm Bringhurst and Ferris.

Deeds , 1799-1823

Jonathan Bringhurst to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1799 July 22   [Box 7 F211]

Jonathan Bringhurst transferred his inheritance from the Ann Pole estate in satisfaction of his debt to brother Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.

James Johnson and wife Ann to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1812 February 24   [Box 7 F211]

For a lot of land on Third Street in Wilmington, Delaware. On vellum with seals.

Paul Beck, Jr., and wife Mary to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr. , 1823   [Box 7 F211]

For dwelling house and lot on High Street near the Rumford and Wilton lines in Wilmington, Delaware. Signed by Robert Wharton, mayor of Philadelphia. On vellum with seals.

Isaac Harvey, Jr., and wife Agnes; Samuel A. Harvey and wife Elizabeth; and Charles Harvey and wife Mary to Paul Beck, Jr. , 1821   [Box 7 F211]

For dwelling house and lot on High Street near the Rumford and Wilton lines in Wilmington, Delaware. Signed by Robert Wharton, mayor of Philadelphia. On vellum.

Deborah Ferris Bringhurst , 1774-1868

Will , 1844, 1868   [Box 7 F212]

Executors Joseph Bringhurst and Edward Bringhurst [Sr.]. Witnessed by brothers Ziba and Benjamin Ferris. Also includes 1868 deed of assignment for William Bringhurst (1833-1898, son of Ziba Ferris Bringhurst and Amy Veale Bringhurst) transferring reversionary interest to executors Joseph Bringhurst and Edward Bringhurst [Sr.].

Estate of Ziba Ferris , 1817   [Box 7 F213]

Chancellor's decree for the partition of the real estate of Ziba Ferris, father of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. Includes land surveys created by Isaac Briggs which included property originally owned by William Shipley (1693-1768).

Legal and financial documents , 1774-1870   [Box 7 F214]

Folder contains documents relating to the estate of James Bringhurst (formerly the John Pole estate). The property along Grays Ferry Road in Passyunk, Pennsylvania, bordered the Schuykill River where the Schuykill and Delaware Canal Company were building a canal. Included are letters from Deborah Bringhurst to prominent Philadelphia lawyer Eli K. Price regarding the case of Robb vs. Longstreet. Deborah Bringhurst was intent on withholding the rights of the property from the canal builders. The folder also includes documents relating to a dispute over property on Third Street in Wilmington between Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and his brother James Bringhurst; 1841 agreement between Edward Grubb and wife and Deborah Bringhurst et al establishing a division line between their properties; 1839 plot survey of Third Street property to determine boundaries; two plot survey of the former property of James Bringhurst at Grays Ferry Road, as referred to in his will.

Wilmington property (Third Street) , 1807, 1831   [Box 7 F215]

Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (20 inches).

Deed of mortgage from James Johnston to William Hemphill for property on Third Street in Wilmington bordering land of John Moore's heirs, William [Alrights], George Goodman (see also Legal--Joseph Bringhurst, Jr.--Deeds). Floor plan of unidentified house, possibly the work of Benjamin Ferris and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. Clipping from Wilmington Morning News depicting a house at 303 West Street in Wilmington, Delaware, where General Washington established his headquarters in the latter days of August 1777.

Ziba Ferris (1786-1875), brother of Deborah Ferris Bringhurst , 1758-1850

Land patent to Robert Peirce (also spelled Pierce) , 1758   [Box 7 F216]

Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases

For twenty eight acres of marsh, north of the Christina River at the mouth of Deer Creek on the creek's eastern side. Signed by William Denny, deputy governor of Pennsylvania from 1756 to 1759. Thomas Penn and Richard Penn (sons of William Penn) are cited as proprietaries and governors. On vellum with large paper seal.

Deed, John Stapler to Ziba Ferris , 1793   [Box 7 F217]

1793 deed from John Stapler, Esq., and wife Jemima to Ziba Ferris, cabinetmaker. For a lot of land and marsh near Deer Creek in Wilmington. On vellum.

Deer Creek Marsh , 1809-1820   [Box 7 F218]

Folder contains materials related to Deborah Bringhurst's purchase of Deer Creek Marsh land for her brother Ziba Ferris that had originally been their father's, the elder Ziba Ferris. Items include memorandums and ledgers regarding the finances of the purchase, a paper wrapper, and an 1809 copy of 1758 survey made for Robert Peirce of marshland bordering Deer Creek and the Christiana River (now Christina River).

Copy of Minutes of Provincial Council of Pennsylvania , 1850   [Box 7 F219]

Removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches)

This assembly, led by speaker Caesar Rodney, appointment of the "Deer Creek Company," who were given the charge of maintaining Deer Creek Marsh on Wilmington's Lower West side. One of the company members, Robert Pierce, obtained part of Deer Creek Marsh in 1758 through a land patent from Thomas and Richard Penn. Copy of original document which was signed by Caesar Rodney and Joseph Shippen, Jr.

Subseries II.A.4. Edward Bringhurst, Sr. and Sarah Shipley Bringhurst , 1820-1873
Sarah Shipley Bringhurst , 1829-1858, undated

Sarah Shipley Bringhurst (1812-1896) was the wife of Edward Bringhurst, Sr., (1809-1884) and the mother of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., (1835-1912). She was the daughter of Samuel Shipley (the brother of Joseph Shipley, Jr.) and Elizabeth Jefferis (the daughter of Captain James Jefferis). Joseph Shipley, Jr., willed his Rockwood estate to be divided equally among his nieces and nephews, and Sarah Shipley was able to use her share of the estate proceeds to purchase the Rockwood house, property, and many of the furnishings at auction for her son, Edward Bringhurst, Jr.

Shipley genealogy notes , undated   [Box 7 F220]

Notes regarding the descendants of William and Margaret Shipley. William Shipley (1721-1793) was cousin to Thomas Shipley (1718-1889), the grandfather of Joseph Shipley, Jr., and great-grandfather of Sarah Shipley Bringhurst.

General correspondence , 1829-1858   [Box 7 F221]

Correspondents include Anna [surname unknown] and M. Poole, probably Mary Poole Wilson (1795-1863, daughter of William Poole and Sarah Sharpless). Also includes Christmas letter from Edward Bringhurst, Sr., who expressed excitement to Sarah Shipley that soon their "fortunes will be united." Folder also contains scraps of a letter from Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody.

Souvenirs , 1831, 1858, undated   [Box 7 F222]

Agreement by Sarah Shipley Bringhurst and other "ladies of Wilmington," to raise funds to furnish the Wilmington Library and Young Men's Association with "a good carpet." 1831 invitation to Sarah Shipley to accompany Edward Bringhurst, James M. Corse, and J.C. Grubb on a steamboat excursion. Handiwork of Sarah Shipley Bringhurst including a lace baby bonnet, a quilt sample, a paper star, and a swatch of cotton needlework with note: "Last piece of my mother Sarah Bringhurst handiwork made a short time before her death. E Bringhurst Jr. 12 mo 13 1896. She died just two months ago."

Marriage certificate , 1832 May 8   [Box 7 F223]

For Edward Bringhurst and Sarah Shipley. Witnessed by Samuel Shipley, wife Elizabeth Shipley, Ziba Ferris Bringhurst, Thomas J. Megear, Richard M. Acton, Mary Dickinson Bringhurst, Mary Anna Dixon, Mary C. Wilson, and Thomas S. Newlin. Signed by Richard H. Bayard, who became the first mayor of Wilmington the same year. On vellum with seals.

Edward Bringhurst, Sr. , 1820-1873

Edward Bringhurst, Sr. (1809-1884) was the fourth of five children born to Joseph Bringhurst, Jr., and Deborah Ferris Bringhurst. He received little formal education and learned the drug business in his father’s store on Market Street near Fourth Street in Wilmington. In 1830, at the age of twenty-one, Bringhurst established his own drug store two blocks north at Sixth and Market Streets under the firm name of E. Bringhurst and Co. In 1832 he married Sarah Shipley (1791-1872), niece of Joseph Shipley, Jr., banker and future-builder of Rockwood. The couple had two sons who survived into adulthood: Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912 married Anna James Webb) and Ferris Bringhurst (1837-1871 married Mary W. Betts). Edward Bringhurst, Sr., later assisted Joseph Shipley Jr., in the purchasing of Rockwood land and in preparations for the latter’s return journey to America (for which Bringhurst made a transatlantic voyage in 1851). In 1857, Edward Bringhurst, Sr., retired and devoted much of his time to charitable and benevolent organizations including the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (of which he was president), the Wilmington Fountain Society, and the Concord Turnpike Company. He was also director of the National Bank of Delaware, and the New Castle County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and was one of the promoters and originators of the Wilmington Savings Fund Society. As a Quaker, was also an active member of the Wilmington Friend’s meeting at Fourth and West Streets. Bringhurst became a trustee of the Shipley estate, which through his wife Sarah’s efforts, would eventually pass Rockwood to their son Edward Jr. Edward Bringhurst, Sr., suffered a "stroke of paralysis" and died in 1884. His obituary describes him as a “model citizen,” whose, “industry, temperance, keen foresight, and honesty of purpose brought him that good measure of success, competence and influence which ought to be every good man’s share.”

Passport , 1851   [Box 7 F224]

Folder contains paper passport (issued in England, number 1313) and passport book. Paper passport contains stamps from many of the French cities and hotels Edward Bringhurst, Sr., visited during his European tour with Joseph Shipley, Jr., in 1851. The passport book, also bearing the names of consulates in cities and towns, contains stamps for passage through the Italian portion of the trip. The folder also contains note: "Grandfather E. Bringhurst sailed for Europe on the S.S. Arctic for Liverpool England, February 4, 1851. Returned to U.S.A. June 7, 1851. In Europe 4 months." See also: [The following two folders] and Shipley passport]

Memorandums of a voyage to Europe (1 of 2) , 4 February 1851- 15 March 1851   [Box 7 F225]

This folder contains the first of two leather bound travel journals belonging to Edward Bringhurst, Sr. In 1851, Bringhurst travelled to Liverpool, England, to assist in uncle-in-law Joseph Shipley, Jr’s return to the United States and, with him, travel and sightsee in Europe. His transatlantic voyage took place on the Collins Line Steamer S.S. Artic under Captain James C. Luce in February of 1851. Bringhurst’s account of the crossing includes descriptions of fierce weather (whereby the ship’s bow would drop twelve feet below the water before rising twelve feet above the horizon). On the Artic , Shipley met Haskell of Haskell and Merrick, drug wholesalers who recommended to him Andrew Jackson Downing’s A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America. Bringhurst also wrote of his regret in forgetting his daguerreotype of wife Sarah Shipley and his children. As the ship approached the coast of Ireland, it was met by the steamer Europa , bound for Boston. Bringhurst also described passing the Sussex lighthouses and his arrival at Liverpool where an announcement was made that the steamship Atlantic, thought to be lost at sea, had also safely arrived. Bringhurst rode to Shipley’s home at Wyncote in Allerton and was kindly received, remarking, “His house is elegantly furnished and has the comforts that [] require. The grounds are beautifully laid out…” The two travelled to Childwall Abbey where Shipley had made his summer residence for several years and also visited the Waterloo and Prince's docks to see the shipping operations of Brown, Shipley and Co. The two met with J. Longton (manager of the bank of Liverpool); Edward Rushton-Booth, Earl; Captain Thomas Shipley of the Underwriter and several others who called at Wyncote. The two then travelled to London to begin a sightseeing tour of Europe. After obtaining passports, the two travelled to the “Chrystal Palace,” in Hyde Park where the Great Exhibition of 1851 was taking place. They also visited the British Museum and the Cathedral of St. Paul, of which Bringhurst gives detailed accounts. The two then travelled to Paris, Mareilles, Nice, Savona, and Genoa. Bringhurst intermittently detailed Joseph Shipley Jr.’s health during the course of the trip.

Memorandums of a voyage to Europe (2 of 2) , 16 March 1851- 3 June 1851   [Box 8 F226]

Edward Bringhurst, Sr., began his second travel journal in Genoa on the 16 March, 1851. Bringhurst and Joseph Shipley, Jr., traveled to Genoa, Leghorn, Sienna, Rome, Naples, and Pompeii over the course of two months before beginning their return trip to England. The two visited monuments, ruins, cathedrals, and other landmarks, of which Bringhurst wrote extensive and detailed descriptions. In Naples, Bringhurst witnessed the American frigates Independence , Cumberland , and Mississippi at port. Bringhurst wrote a meticulous account of his and Shipley’s visit to Mount Vesuvius where the two hiked and dined (Shipley, in his debilitation from gout, was borne over the terrain by paid men). The two also attended a mass presided by Pope Pius IX on their return trip through Rome. Upon their return to England, Bringhurst again visited the Great Exhibition at the “Chrystal Palace,” in London. He wrote detailed descriptions of his observations there, particularly focusing on medicines, herbs, barks, and roots pertinent to his trade as a druggist. He also again visited the London Museum and other notable landmarks throughout the city. Bringhurst and Shipley, with the help of a friend, were admitted into the House of Commons where they chanced to witness the passing of the Ecclesiastical Titles Act of 1851. Upon their return to Liverpool, Joseph Shipley, Jr., sold Wyncote but remained in England for approximately one month longer. Bringhurst departed Liverpool on 28 May, 1851 via the Pacific , a sidewheel steamship that had broken the eastbound transatlantic speed record just eight days earlier (20 May, 1851). He arrived safely in New York on 3 June, 1851, having crossed the Atlantic in “ten days and two and a half hours.”

Ephemera , 1827-1861, undated   [Box 8 F227]

Folder includes: 1861 invitation to Edward Bringhurst, Sr., for the marriage of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna J. Webb; 1827 cut of Edward Bringhurst, Sr.'s hair with annotation by Deborah Bringhurst. The interior of the wrapping includes an excerpt from a poem entitled, "The Moss Rose"; an "impression taken from an old seal," as annotated by Edward Bringhurst, Jr.; 1832 invitation to tea addressed to Mary Harlan from Edward and Sarah Shipley Bringhurst.

Obituaries , 1884   [Box 8 F228]

Clippings of obituaries of Edward Bringhurst, Sr., from various (unidentified) Wilmington newspapers.

Miscellaneous documents , 1820-1868   [Box 8 F229]

Folder includes 1848 telegraph to Sarah Bringhurst, four Bank of Delaware banknotes, and an 1820 deed from Jonathan Harvey and wife Jane to Paul Beck containing seal and watermark. Also includes documents pertaining to the Bringhurst estate and correspondence from the American Gas Company.

Political ephemera , 1830-1868, 1777   [Box 8 F230]

This folder contains various currency, tickets, and envelope stock contemporary to Edward Bringhurst, Sr., including a three dollar bill of the Delaware City bank dated 1830 May 19 (Toppan Carpenter, printer), an 1868 admission ticket (no. 717) issued by the U. S. Senate for the “Impeachment of the President,” [Andrew Johnson], and envelope stock from the “Mint of the United States.” The folder also contains a circa 1857 engraved envelope containing South Carolina continental currency dated 1777. The eight dollar bill reads: “This bill intitles the Bearer to receive Eight Spanish milled Dollars, or the Value thereof in Gold or Silver according to an Act of the General Assembly passed, at CHARLES-TOWN, the 23rd Day of December, 1776.” Printed by Pet[er] Timothy, 1777. “Death to counterfeit.”

Correspondence , 1820-1873   [Box 8 F231]

The bulk of this folder consists of correspondence sent by Edward Bringhurst, Sr., to wife Sarah Shipley during his tour of Europe with Joseph Shipley, Jr. Many of Bringhurst's letters correlate directly with entries found in his travel journals regarding places such as Wyncote and Childwall Abbey of Liverpool, the British Museum, Zoological Gardens, and the "Chrystal Palace," at the Great Exhibition in London, and the Hotel l'Orient and Palace of Versailles in France. Other correspondence includes letters from sister Mary Dickinson Bringhurst Moody via Port Gibson, Mississippi, and Watkins Glen, New York. One letter Bringhurst wrote to his wife Sarah references "the long, low, black schooner," [ La Amistad ] having just been taken by the surveying brig Washington off the east end of Long Island, New York.

Ferris Bringhurst (1837-1871) , 1871, undated

Ferris Bringhurst, son of Sarah Shipley Bringhurst and Edward Bringhurst, Sr., died a traumatic death from injuries sustained from a gas retort explosion in 1871. The accident occurred at the E. Bringhurst laboratory where Ferris worked as a business partner with his father and Z. James Belt.

Marriage certificate , 1861   [Box 8 F232]

For Ferris Bringhurst and Mary W. Betts. Witnessed by members of the Smyth, Betts, Warner, Bringhrust, Grubb, Webb, Ferris, and Paxson families. On vellum.

Death , 1871   [Box 8 F233]

This folder includes clippings describing the Bringhurst accident and announcing the erection of a memorial in Ferris Bringhurst's honor. It also includes an earlier 1861 wedding invitation for the marriage of Ferris Bringhurst and Mary W. Vetts and a valentine card.

Portrait , undated   [Box 8 F234]

Engravings (prints) of Ferris Bringhurst.

Series II.B. Rockwood-era Bringhursts , 1890-1892

The Rockwood-era Bringhurst family papers comprise the bulk of the Rockwood collection. The Bringhurst family moved into Rockwood in 1892, after the death of Hannah Shipley, the last surviving sister of Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867). Joseph's will allowed his sisters to live in Rockwood until their deaths, but provided that when the last sister died the estate would be liquidated and all proceeds would be divided equally amongst his nieces and nephews (Shipley never married and had no children). Sarah Shipley Bringhurst (1812-1896), niece of Joseph Shipley, Jr., and mother of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) was able to use her share of the estate proceeds to purchase the Rockwood house, property, and many of the furnishings for her son.

The papers in this series are drawn from the two generations of Bringhurst family members who lived in the Rockwood estate: those of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. and his wife Anna James Webb (1843-1923), and those of their four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (1874-1947), and Edward Bringhurst III (1884-1939). Subseries are organized for each member of the family, followed by a subseries that contains legal, financial, and social documents generally related to the Rockwood-era Bringhurst family but not specifically tied to one person.

The bulk of the series consists of the personal correspondence of family members, particularly letters sent home from abroad while travelling or living in Europe. The largest portion of this correspondence subseries consists of letters from Elizabeth sent home to her family while she was living on the estate of her husband, John Galt-Smith (d. 1899), at Kilwaughter Castle in Larne, Ireland. Elizabeth relied on her connections to British high society to inform the advice on taste and fashion which she often imparted to her family members through these letters.

The balance of the series consists of personal records and journals, ephemera, social documentation (invitations, address books, etc.). These reveal intimate details of the family’s personal and social life, detailing family humor, sewing skills, recipes, and generally giving a sense of what life was like for Wilmington’s upper crust in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Family fashion, social activities and vacations are further documented through family photographs that can be found in Series IV.A.1 Photographs.

Additionally, there are many legal and financial documents that give a window into the monetary concerns involved in running such a large estate. Further legal and financial documents can be found in Subgroup III Hargraves family papers, as Gordon Hargraves accumulated many papers related to the estate while serving as legal guardian Mary T. Bringhurst during the latter part of her life, and then as executor of both her estate and then his own wife’s estate, as Rockwood was transitioned from being a family home to a museum in the 1970s.

Subseries II.B.1. Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912)

Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) was the great nephew of Joseph Shipley, Jr. (1795-1867). He was a pharmacist and Wilmington businessman who served as director of the Wilmington Savings Fund Society, president of the New Castle County Fire Insurance Company, president of the Wilmington and Great Valley Turnpike Co, director of several railroad companies, and a member of the Delaware Historical Society. He was also a practicing Quaker and a member of the Wilmington Friends Meeting.

Edward Bringhurst, Jr., married Anna James Webb (1843-1923), the daughter of another prominent local Quaker family, on April 22, 1862. Anna and Edward had four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst (born 1863), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (born 1865), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (born 1874), and Edward Bringhurst III (born 1884). In 1892, Edward Bringhurst Jr. purchased the Rockwood house, property, and much of the furnishings from the estate of Joseph Shipley with the financial help of his mother, Sarah Shipley Bringhurst (a beneficiary of Joseph Shipley), and moved his family there shortly after. Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and his wife are buried next to each other in the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery in Wilmington, Delaware.

The subseries contains correspondence between Edward Bringhurst Jr. and his wife Anna Bringhurst, journals and diaries detailing the day-to-day of Edward Bringhurst Jr.'s life, and social ephemera such as dance cards, guest lists, and seating charts for parties. The subseries also contains many items related to Edward Bringhurst Jr.'s business interests, particularly his investments in local railroads. In addition, a large file details his role as the trustee and executor of the estates of many of his wealthy family members. Of particularly interest is his trusteeship of the estate of Joseph Shipley, Jr., which he managed for the benefit of Joseph's two sisters, Sarah and Hannah, until their deaths. This last file also contains a number of deeds to property that were accumulated in the estate settlement process, including many for the farms which were later amalgamated to create Rockwood.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.2. Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1923)

Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1923) was the wife of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912), who she married on April 22, 1862. She and Edward were both Quakers who attended the Wilmington Friends Meeting. Anna and Edward had four children: Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst (born 1863), Mary Thomas Bringhurst (born 1865), Edith Ferris Bringhurst (born 1874), and Edward Bringhurst III (born 1884). Anna and Edward are buried at the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery.

This subseries contains personal correspondence to and from Anna, some of which detail her early courtship with Edward. Additional files contain financial and legal documents, as well as receipts for household goods, that detail the day-to-day expenses of living in Rockwood in the late 19th century.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.

Subseries II.B.3. Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst (1863-1932)

Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932) was the daughter of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. Born in Wilmington, Delaware in 1863, she was commonly referred to as “Bessie” in family papers and correspondence. Bessie married the widower John Galt-Smith (d. 1899), a linen merchant twenty years her senior, on June 1, 1886. Galt-Smith had two children from his previous marriage. The couple split their time between living in New York City and Ireland, generally spending June to August in Ireland and the rest of the year in America.

In Ireland the Galt-Smiths first lived in "Meadowbank," a house in a suburb north of Belfast. In 1891, John Galt Smith signed a 30-year lease on Kilwaughter Castle, ancestral home of the Galt family, in Larne, Ireland. After her husband died in 1899, Bessie continued to live at Kilwaughter during the summer and in America in the winter.

Bessie’s personal correspondence indicates that she considered herself to be a lady of high social standing and refinement. Even during her time in Ireland, her tastes (honed by her connections to British high society) strongly informed how the Bringhurst family decorated Rockwood, as well as their clothing choices. Much of her correspondence is filled with advice and critiques related fashion, manners, and matters of style.

Bessie traveled to Ireland in June of 1914 and became stranded due to the onset of hostilities leading to World War I. She was unable to book safe passage back to America until 1919. During the war years Bessie continued to be in brisk communication with her family back home in Wilmington. Letters from this period detail her relationships with her servants and the minutia of running a large estate during wartime. Due to the lack of men and help due to both Bessie’s personal circumstances and the war, the letters from this time offer and unusually detailed glimpse into the lives of average servants and workers on a large Irish estate in the early 20th century. Bessie came to know many of her servants quite well and included many details of their personal lives in letters back to her family in America.

The letters also offer a great deal of insight into her Bessie’s experience with the Ulster Women's Unionist Council and her connections to various important Unionist personages, including Mr. and Mrs. Bertie McCalmont, to whom she had intended to sub-lease Kilwaughter until the beginning of World War I scuttled the possibility. During war-time Bessie also made Kilwaughter available as a convalescent facility for injured officers and organized and hosted weekly sewing parties of local famer's wives and the local gentry combined to provide clothing and other cloth goods for use by military hospitals.

After the end of World War I, the deteriorating security situation caused by the escalating Irish Civil War prompted Bessie to vacate Kilwaughter. Many possessions were removed with her back to America, and the rest were sold at auction. Bessie moved back to Delaware in 1922 and lived at Rockwood for the remainder of her life, where she and her sister Mary entertained guests with extensive dinner parties, details of which are documented through guest lists and place cards that can be found in Subseries II.B.8. "Bessie Bringhurst and John Galt-Smith are buried next to each other at the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery.

The bulk of this subseries consists of personal correspondence from Bessie to friends and family living in Delaware during her time living in Ireland, and discusses travel, day to day life, fashion, style, and family gossip. The remainder consists of legal and financial documents, as well as documents related to the sale of much of the contents of Kilwaughter Castle upon her return to Delaware.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.

Subseries II.B.4. Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965)

Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965) was the second child of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912). She never married, and lived in Rockwood from when her grandmother and her father bought the estate until her death, at which point she willed Rockwood to her niece, Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972). Near the end of her life, Mary Thomas Bringhurst made clear to her niece her “primary desire to preserve the beauty of Rockwood,” both mansion and estate, even if accomplished by a, “transfer to a public or private body politic or institution.”

Mary’s life spanned a century from the end of the Civil War until the era of the Civil Rights Movement. It is largely due to her role as keeper of the family home and heritage that the Rockwood house museum with is trove of furnishings and the archive of Shipley, Bringhurst and Hargraves papers exist today. Mary instilled a love of the Rockwood property and family history in her favored niece, Nancy, who with her husband Gordon Hargraves preserved the Rockwood legacy. Subgroup III Hargraves family papers further documents Mary’s personal relations and legal arrangements with the Hargraves.

This subseries consists of correspondence between Mary and her family, particularly during trips abroad to Europe during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The trips were engaged both with the purpose of tourism, as well as to visit her sister Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932) at her home in Kilwaughter Castle, Ireland.

The second half of the subseries contains bill, business, and legal documents related to Mary's day to day life, including many items related to the management and upkeep of Rockwood, such as explosives permits, insurance receipts, and utility bills. Also included are various items related to home life, including sewing patterns and cookbooks with handwritten family recipes

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.5. Edith Ferris Bringhurst (1874-1947)

Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers (1874-1947) was the third daughter of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and the only one to have children. She married Alexander Sellers in 1897 in a wedding at Rockwood, and lived with her husband in Radnor, Pennsylvania. They had four children: Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972), William Sellers (1899-1995), Alexander Sellers, Jr. (1901-1970), and Edith Claypoole Sellers Farnum (1910-1999). Daughter Nancy inherited Rockwood from her aunt, Edith's sister Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965).

This series consists of correspondence between Edith and family members. See also Subseries III Hargraves Family Papers for further documents related to Edith's marriage, as well as her later life and role as mother to Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.6. Edward Bringhurst III/V (1884-1939)

Edward Bringhurst III/V (1884-1939) was the youngest child of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., (1835-1912) and Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1912). Although his given appellation was Edward III (the third), after a trip to Europe in 1896 he unilaterally and without explanation changed it to Edward V (the fifth).

Edward III/V was educated at home and traveled extensively during his childhood and youth. Notable trips included visits to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, as well as to Washington, D.C., and many trips to Europe with his sister Elizabeth Bringhurst Galt-Smith (1863-1932) as well as other family members.

As an adult, he managed the Rockwood estate and the family's financial investments. Edward III/V was a connoisseur of fine furniture and antiques, as well as an accomplished dog breeder and aviation hobbyist. He was also a successful amateur photographer who exhibited at the Wilmington Salon 1934 and 1935. Many examples of his work can be found in Series IV Photographs.

Edward spent much of his life in ill health (further exacerbated by an aviation accident), and died at the relatively young age of fifty-five. He is buried with his family at the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery in Wilmington, Delaware.

The subseries begins with correspondence from Edward to friends and family during his trips abroad during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including visits to a sanitarium in Scotland in 1911 and 1913. In addition, the subseries contains legal and business documents, largely tax related, as well as many items from Edward's childhood, including scrapbooks documents his travels as a child. Also included are many pieces drawn from Edward's dual hobbies of dog showing and photography, including items related to his champion Great Dane, Guido.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.7 Frances McTear

Frances McTear was a cousin to John Galt Smith. This subseries includes correspondence from her to Elizabeth Bringhurst Galt Smith, and other Bringhurst family members.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.8. Bringhurst family documents

This subseries contains Bringhurst family related items that cannot be identified as belonging to or being created by a particular family member. As the entire family lived together in Rockwood for a number of years, many invitations and other items were addressed to or created by multiple family members. Included are items such as address books, invitations, holiday lists, newspaper clippings, obituaries and death notices, pamphlets, awards, and other miscellaneous items related to the family's social life.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subseries II.B.9. Rockwood financial and legal documents

This subseries contains bills and receipts related to the upkeep of Rockwood that are not associated with a particular family member.

Subgroup II. Bringhurst family papers is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subgroup III. Hargraves family , 1897-1978

The Hargraves subgroup comprises personal Hargraves family papers as well as important development plans, bills, receipts, financial and insurance documents, inventories, wills, deeds, real estate documents, and legal documents related to the Rockwood home and property. The Hargraves papers preserve the history of the last family to privately own the Rockwood estate before its donation to New Castle County for use as a museum and public park in the mid-1970s.

The bulk of the subgroup includes the papers of Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972) and her husband Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983), the last private owners of Rockwood. Nancy, daughter of Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers and Alexander Sellers, was the favored niece of Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), last surviving sibling of the Bringhurst children who lived at Rockwood. Nancy and her husband, Gordon Hargraves, provided great support to Mary Bringhurst, who during her lifetime expressed increasing concern for the preservation of the Rockwood home and property. Correspondence and papers in this subgroup document personal relationships but are primarily related to estate planning for the Bringhurst and Hargraves family heirlooms, maintenance of Rockwood, and plans for various real estate development and estate preservation projects for Rockwood. It is clear that Nancy and Gordon sought to respect the wishes of Mary Bringhurst to preserve "Rockwood Manor House," and that Gordon carried on the work alone after Nancy's death. Her will also stipulated, "I desire special consideration be given to the possibilities of preserving Rockwood Manor House for future generations."

A small series of files related to other Sellers and Farnum family members is found at the beginning of the subgroup. (See also the Family Genealogies subgroup for extensive genealogical notes and sources collected by Edith Sellers Farnum.) Early personal correspondence of Nancy and Gordon Hargraves is found in Series III.B., followed by four additional series of documents largely maintained by Gordon Hargraves in the course of managing and planning for the preservation of the estate. There are extensive plans and surveys for proposed developments and subdivisions of Rockwood, which became inevitable in "modern times" after portions of the estate were condemned for a city sewer and the construction of Interstate 95.

Series III.A. Sellers family members , 1897-1958

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers was the grandchild of Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna Webb Bringhurst. She was the daughter of Edith Ferris Bringhurst and Alexander Sellers, and sister of Edith Claypoole Sellers Farnum, who also appears in correspondence and legal documents elsewhere in this subgroup of Hargraves family papers. Papers in this series provide a glimpse of Sellers family relations. See also Subgroup VI. Genealogies, which includes materials collected by Edith Farnum, who was especially interested in family history.

Edith Ferris Bringhurst , 1891, undated   [Box III.1 F1]

Photographic negatives of Edith Ferris Bringhurst in "Camp Lost-In-The-Woods" Maine, "haying" with Betty, her horse. 1891 invitation for junior exercises of Haverford College class of 1892. Speakers included Warren H. Detwiler, John W. Muir, Walter M. Hart, Nelson L. West, Minturn P. Collins, and Stanley R. Yarnall.

Edith Ferris Bringhurst - Alexander Sellers wedding , 1897   [Box III.1 F2]

Edith Bringhurst's June 2, 1897, wedding to Alexander Sellers was described as "one of the most fashionable and without a doubt the most artistic weddings" of the season in news clippings found in this folder. Held at Rockwood, "The ceremony was performed on the green lawn with the blue sky as the canopy and nature's flowers, rocks and trees as the confining walls of the vast green floor." The folder also includes invitations, an engraved printing plate for the invitation, and lists of wedding guests.

Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers and Alexander Sellers , 1897-1957   [Box III.1 F3]

This file contains legal documents related to the estates of Edith Bringhurst Sellers (1874-1947) and her husband, Alexander Sellers (1875-1957). Contains a Christmas greeting card printed by Dreka Fine Stationary, 1121 Chestnut Street Philadelphia. Also includes letter from Farnum to his children expressing a desire for his children to agree on what can be done about the "Maine Camp," presumably "Camp-Lost-In-the-Woods."

Will of Richard Sellers , 1940   [Box III.1 F4]

Richard Sellers, of Bellevue, New Castle County, was the brother of Alexander Sellers and uncle of Nancy Sellers Hargraves.

Will of Henry W. Farnum , 1947, 1958   [Box III.1 F5]

Husband of Edith Claypole Sellers Farnum.

Edith Claypoole Sellers Farnum correspondence , 1923-1947   [Box III.1 F6]

Various letters, some addressed to "Mrs. Henry F. Farnum, Jr." (Edith Sellers Farnum, 1910-1999) at Righter's Mill Road, Narberth (Ardmore), Pennsylvania, and some to Mrs. Henry W. Farnum (Anna Scott Farnum, Edith's mother-in-law) at Green Hill Farms, Overbrook, Pennsylvania. Also includes genealogical notes demonstrating particular interest in the life of ancestor Captain James Jefferis.

Edith Claypoole Sellers Farnum family papers , 1927-1934, 1965   [Box III.1 F7] (Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Includes society newsclippings for Edith Sellers as a young woman (1927) and for her wedding, 1933. Genealogical notes regarding Bringhursts, Sharpless, Webb, Jefferis, Sellers, Shipley, and various family notes. Sellers notes such as "Why called the Monte Carlo room?" demonstrate her interest in Rockwood's history. Oversize material removed to Map Case 24 x 20 inch.

Series III.B. Nancy Sellers Hargraves and Gordon Sweat Hargraves papers , 1927-1972

Personal papers and correspondence of Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-72) of "Meadowbrook," at Radnor, Pennsylvania, and Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983). A small group of Nancy Bringhurst's early personal papers is followed by correspondence, including courting letters between Nancy and Gordon Hargraves. Other recipients and senders include Gordon’s parents Frank Hargraves (1855-1932) and Nellie Lord Hargraves (1867-1927) of West Buxton, Maine; his brother Hobart L. Hargraves (1894-1974) of Needham Heights, Massachusetts; and his son Gordon Sellers "Skip" Hargraves (born 1932). The series also includes letters to and from Nancy's aunt, Mary Thomas Bringhurst (1865-1965), who willed the Rockwood estate to Nancy upon her death in 1965. The Hargraves were the last family to privately own Rockwood before its donation to the county as a museum in the mid-1970s.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers - Mary Thomas Bringhurst correspondence , 1899-1953   [Box III.1 F8]

Personal letters between Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972) and her aunt Mary T. Bringhurst (1865-1965), who willed the Rockwood mansion to Nancy in 1965. Includes one 1899 letter from Aunt Mary to Nancy and a newsclipping about a party at Rockwood to celebrate Nancy's first birthday. The contents of this folder (early notes, poetry, correspondence) clearly indicate that "Aunt Mary" doted on her niece, Nancy Sellers.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers early personal papers , 1897-1917   [Box III.1 F9]

Includes early school work, sketches, notes, with a school report book.

Nancy Sellers and Gordon Sweat Hargraves sketches , 1903-1928   [Box III.1 F10]

Doodles, drawings, and sketches, notably including pen and ink drawings of Nancy on skis.

Nancy Sellers presentation at St. James Court, London , 1922   [Box III.1 F11] (Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Elizabeth Galt-Smith arranged for her niece Nancy Sellers to be presented to King George and Queen Mary at the Court of St. James in London, June 21, 1922. This folder includes instructions for "dress to be worn by ladies at their majesties' courts" from the Ceremonial Department, St. James's Palace, and a note about what Nancy wore. The folder also includes a typed letter signed by Winston Churchill regarding Mrs. Galt-Smith's attempts to obtain an Ascot ticket for Nancy Sellers. Oversize material removed to Oversize Half Map.

Gordon Sweat Hargraves letters to Nancy Bringhurst Sellers , 1926-1927   [Box III.1 F12]

Courtship letters, full of affection, written to Nancy on her trip to Banff, Alberta, and when the two were in other locations (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Portland, Maine).

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers letters to Gordon Sweat Hargraves , 1926-1927   [Box III.1 F13]

Letters from Nancy's travel across Canada (Toronto, Banff, etc.) and from a visit to Louisville, Kentucky, and from Lake Placid Club, Essex County, New York, to Gordon, mostly at work at Curtis Publishing Co, in Philadelphia.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers wedding to Gordon Sweat Hargraves , circa 1927   [Box III.1 F14]

Includes lists of guests invited to the wedding.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers - Gordon Sweat Hargraves wedding invitation , 1927   [Box III.1 F15] ()

Invitation to the wedding, held on October 19, 1927, at "Meadowcroft," the Sellers family home, in Radnor, Pennsylvania. Box of engraved printing plates for the wedding invitations, from Dreka fine stationers, Philadelphia, removed to 1-inch manuscript box (Box 6).

Mrs. Gordon S. Hargraves - J. E. Caldwell & Co. , 1927-1928   [Box III.1 F16]

Correspondence, receipts, and list of Nancy and Gordon Hargraves' wedding gifts from Caldwell's in Philadelphia, along with a newsclipping reporting a fire at "Meadowcroft," the Radnor estate of Nancy's parents, where wedding gifts were stored.

Sketch for a garden, Ten East 61st Street, New York City , circa 1928   [Box III.1 F17]

Pen and ink with watercolor on board. The Hargraves' wedding invitation gave Ten East 61st Street as an "at home" address after December 1, 1927.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hargraves letters to Gordon and Nancy Hargraves , 1926-1927   [Box III.1 F18]

Written from West Buxton, Maine, Nellie Lord Hargraves and Frank Hargraves kept in close touch with their son. This file includes welcoming letters of affection to Nancy after her engagement to Gordon in April 1927.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hargraves letters to Gordon and Nancy Hargraves , 1927-1934   [Box III.1 F19]

Stationery indicates that Frank Hargraves served on the Board of Prison Commissioners in the state of Maine. A 1930 letter on J. Walter Thompson Company letterhead concerns design of a memorial monument for Nellie Lord Hargraves (1866-1927).

Condolences on death of Frank Hargraves (1855-1932) , 1932   [Box III.1 F20]

Letters from friends and family to Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983) on the death of his father.

Hobart Hargraves letters to Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983) , 1926-1934   [Box III.1 F21]

Personal letters from Hobart Hargraves (1894-1974) to his brother, Gordon.

Gordon Sellers "Skip" Hargraves letters to family , 1948-1949   [Box III.1 F22]

Personal letters from Skip Hargraves (b. 1932) to his parents, Gordon and Nancy Hargraves, written from Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, where Skip was a student. Includes one photograph of Skip.

Nancy and Gordon Hargraves correspondence , 1927-1975   [Box III.1 F23]

Includes letter from Bringhurst "cousins" Miriam Worrell Webb and Donald William Webb, letters from friends and relatives regarding the October 8, 1927, wedding of Nancy and Gordon and the 1932 birth of "the boy" (Skip Hargraves), and other personal letters.

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves obituary , 1972   [Box III.1 F24]

Mrs. Hargraves, of Gladwyne, Pennsylvania, and Mt. Desert, Maine, died at a Portland hospital on July 13, 1972. The Hargraves home in Maine was at Small Cove Point on Somes Sound, Mt. Desert. This folder includes an expression of Nancy Sellers Hargraves's hopes for the future of Rockwood Manor House.

Series III.C. Gordon Hargraves personal financial and legal correspondence , 1943-1976

This series includes documents and correspondence related to personal financial and legal affairs of Gordon Sweat Hargraves (1898-1983) and Nancy Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972), as well as some documents relating to investments made by Gordon in the name of Mary T. Bringhurst (1865-1965) while she was under the care of a legal guardian. The series also includes receipts and bills for insurance policies, repairs, and utility payments for Hargraves owned-properties, including Rockwood and their home in Mount Desert, Maine.

Diary and Passport , 1921-1922, 1973   [Box III.1 F25]

The diary includes brief entries from Christmas 1921 and New Year 1922.

Genealogical notes on the Hargraves family , undated   [Box III.1 F26]

Legal affairs , 1961-1975   [Box III.1 F27]

Correspondence, much with Joseph H. Geoghegan of Potter Anderson & Corroon, Wilmington.

Correspondence in account of Mary T. Bringhurst , 1944-1965   [Box III.1 F28]

Correspondence regarding financial, mortgage, and other affairs of Mary Thomas Bringhurst. Nancy's brother William Sellers became co-guardian with the Bank of Delaware of the property of Mary T. Bringhurst in 1962.

Investments , 1950s-1969   [Box III.1 F29]

Insurance , 1943-1976   [Box III.1 F30]

Documents and correspondence for insurance carried on various Hargraves & Rockwood related properties.

Bank books , 1974-1976   [Box III.1 F31]

Appraisal of the personal property of Mr. Gordon S. Hargraves, Mt. Desert, Maine , 1967-1968, 1975   [Box III.1 F32]

1968 appraisal by Robert G. Hall, Appraiser, Dover-Foxcroft, Maine, with some additional, earlier insurance information.

Series III.D. Rockwood personal properties and cultural heritage , 1920-1976

Members of both the Bringhurst and Hargraves families had a deep appreciation for the family heirlooms of furniture, silver, and other personal properties of Rockwood, as well as a strong responsibility for preserving the cultural heritage of the Shipleys, Bringhursts, and Hargraves families and their historic home. This series includes correspondence, receipts, inventories, and other documents from appraisers, restorers, exhibitors, and others interested in the antiques and other family treasures, all of which is useful in understanding the material culture of the families who lived at Rockwood. A number of the files in this series related to appraisals and inventory lists done for disposition of family heirlooms in estate settlements. Nancy and Gordon Hargraves made a significant gesture to preserve the Bringhurst family history of involvement with early American literature by donating an important group of letters from Charles Brockden Brown to Bowdoin College.

Correspondence regarding manuscripts and cultural properties , 1949-1972   [Box III.1 F33]

Historical Society of Delaware , 1944-1976   [Box III.1 F34]

Winterthur , 1964-1967   [Box III.1 F35]

Charles Brockden Brown , 1911, 1966-1970   [Box III.1 F36]

Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810) has been called the first professional man of letters in America. Brown was an intimate friend of Joseph Bringhurst and rival for the affections of Deborah Ferris. Robert F. Metzdorf appraised a considerable collection of Brown, Bringhurst, and Ferris letters, poems, and manuscripts in 1969, which Nancy and Gordon Hargraves donated to Bowdin College in Maine. (See also Subgroup II.A. Pre-Rockwood Bringhursts-currently in process)

Appraisals and sale of antiques , 1953-1975   [Box III.2 F37]

Restorations , 1970-1972   [Box III.2 F38]

Notes concerning Rockwood items , 1920s-1940s   [Box III.2 F39]

Books , circa 1940, 1970   [Box III.2 F40]

Dolls , 1975   [Box III.2 F41]

Guns, rifles, revolvers , circa 1940   [Box III.2 F42]

Register compiled by Mary T. Bringhurst.

Jewelry , 1939   [Box III.2 F43]

Linen , 1970   [Box III.2 F44]

Manuscripts, literary property, pictorial works , 1972   [Box III.2 F45]

Includes appraisals by Timothy Trace for Shipley, Ferris, and Bringhurst documents. See also Series I. for correspondence related to inventories of Joseph Shipley documents that were prepared for a corporate history of Brown Brothers and Brown Shipley & Co.

Paintings and portraits , 1974 and undated   [Box III.2 F46]

Silver - Edward Bringhurst V purchases from Wannamaker's , 1935-1938   [Box III.2 F47]

Silver - Edward and Mary Bringhurst purchases from Daisy Baily, New Castle , 1935-1947   [Box III.2 F48]

Silver - family notes , undated   [Box III.2 F49]

Silver - inventories and lists , 1941, 1963   [Box III.2 F50]

Notes related to furniture , 1940-1975   [Box III.2 F51] (Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Inventory and appraisal notes , 1942-1943   [Box III.2 F51a]

Inventory of Rockwood , 1942   [Box III.2 F52]

Two copies of detailed inventory listing contents of each room in Rockwood. One copy is annotated.

Inventory of Rockwood , 1948   [Box III.2 F53]

Two copies of detailed inventory listing contents of each room in Rockwood, with annotations.

Appraisal for property of Miss Mary T. Bringhurst , 1962   [Box III.2 F54] (Item removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches))

Completed upon order of Chancellor Seitz, for Bank of Delaware and William Sellers, co-guardians for Miss Mary T. Bringhurst.

Inventory of Rockwood rooms , circa 1970   [Box III.2 F55]

Furniture inventory of Rockwood by rooms , circa 1970   [Box III.2 F56]

Possibly compiled by Edith Sellers Farnum.

Appraisals for Mr. Gordon Hargraves, 610 Shipley Road , 1970   [Box III.2 F57]

Appraisals by Philip H. Bradley, Antiques, Downingtown, Pennsylvania

Inventory by furniture type (with locations) , circa 1970   [Box III.2 F58]

Inventory / appraisal notes by Gordon Hargraves , circa 1970   [Box III.2 F59]

Inventory by furniture type (with appraised values) , circa 1970   [Box III.2 F60] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Appraisal of the personal property of Mr. Gordon S. Hargraves, 610 Shipley Road , 1974   [Box III.2 F61]

Appraisal by Robert G. Hall, Appraiser, Dover-Foxcroft, Maine

Heirlooms by family provenance , 1940s-1970s   [Box III.2 F62] (Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Includes collected notes and two oversize sheets of genealogical notes with associated heirlooms from Shipley, Bringhurst, and Jefferis families. These two sheets are housed in Oversize Half Map drawers.

Mary Bringhurst notes regarding heirlooms and estate planning , 1940, 1963   [Box III.2 F63]

Mary Bringhurst notes regarding estate planning , 1940-1954   [Box III.2 F64]

Series III.E. Wills, estate, and legal documents , 1923-1975

The bulk of papers in this series centers around Mary T. Bringhurst and her constant estate planning. Extensive inventories and appraisals from the previous series are related to codicils and declarations about disposition of Rockwood real estate and family heirlooms found in the wills, estate, and legal documents found here. Nancy and Gordon Hargraves provided key support to "Sister Mary," as she was known to close relations, as she inventoried property and worked with lawyers.

Will of Edward Bringhurst V and document from Anna James Webb Bringhurst , 1923, 1936   [Box III.2 F65]

The will of Edward Bringhurst V (1884-1939) was executed by John Biggs, Jr., in 1936. The document from his mother, Anna James Webb Bringhurst (1843-1923), concerns disposition of family heirlooms.

Mary Thomas Bringhurst, respondent , 1936-1938   [Box III.2 F66]

Documents relating to the George Washington Memorial Association and a friendly suit transferring its assets to George Washington University.

Will and estate of Mary Thomas Bringhurst , 1942-1954   [Box III.2 F67]

Correspondence and declarations from Mary Bringhurst regarding disposition of real estate and family heirlooms.

Notes regarding the will and estate of Mary Thomas Bringhurst , undated   [Box III.2 F68]

Will and estate of Mary Thomas Bringhurst , 1942-1966   [Box III.2 F69]

Wills, codicils, and correspondence: 1942, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1954, 1965, reflecting the considerable effort put into estate planning by Mary Bringhurst.

Mary Thomas Bringhurst--personal property appraisal and estate tax return , 1962-1965   [Box III.2 F70]

Mary Thomas Bringhurst--estate taxes , 1968-1970   [Box III.2 F71]

Appraisal of Nancy Sellers Hargraves personal property , 1972   [Box III.2 F72]

Nancy Bringhurst Sellers Hargraves will and estate , 1965-1975   [Box III.2 F73]

Nancy Sellers Hargraves died in 1972.

Gordon Sweat Hargraves will and estate , 1971   [Box III.2 F74]

Series III.F. Legal and real estate , 1955-1978

This series includes documents and correspondence related to the Nancy Sellers Hargraves (1898-1972) inheritance of Rockwood, plans to develop portions of the estate for commercial use, and the donation of Rockwood to New Castle County for use as a museum. The series reflects significant land transfers and unrealized development proposals over the years. Mary Thomas Bringhurst and her brother Edward Bringhurst V made a gift of forty acres from the Bringhurst estate to the City of Wilmington for a park in 1936, the City of Wilmington condemned land for a sanitary sewer right of way in 1965, and a portion of land was also taken for construction of Interstate 95. There are numerous land valuations and surveys conducted for appraisals or planned subdivisions. A group of documents relates to settlement of a profit sharing disagreement between Nancy Sellers and her sister, Edith Farnum. From documents in this series, it is clear that real estate management of the Bringhurst property and devotion to protecting Mary Bringhurst's wishes consumed an enormous amount of Gordon Hargraves's time.

Electric lighting plan for addition to residence of Mrs. Edward Bringhurst , 1913   [Box III.3 F75] (Housed in SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

First, second, and third floor plans for addition to Rockwood drawn by Garrett, Miller and Co, Wilmington, Delaware. Later annotations show phone lines as well. These plans included the summer kitchen, servant's dining room, office, second floor conservatory, sewing room, trunk room, etc. Housed in Oversize Half Map.

Bringhurst family rental properties , 1939-1959   [Box III.3 F76]

Receipts, bills, and documents for rental properties and maintenance of those properties, including Braewood, Lunt Cottage, Ferguson House, and the Gate House at Rockwood.

Rockwood property maintenance , 1965-1966   [Box III.3 F77]

In particular, this folder contains a detailed fuse box report from 1966.

Rockwood renovations and other house plans , 1965   [Box III.3 F78] (Housed in SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Plans and drawings made for Gordon Hargraves. The contents of this folder where originally housed in two groups, one dated 1965. A second group of undated drawings is for some interior details and one sketch notes "built in chest with top that lights up" and bears the Stuart Hutchinson. Housed in Oversize Half Map.

Rockwood property -- grounds and trees , 1965-1972   [Box III.3 F79]

Includes specific information about trees damaged in a severe wind storm in 1971.

Rockwood estate -- documents , 1877-1927   [Box III.3 F80]

Mortgages, judgment bonds, a survey, and legal documents related to Rockwood lands.

Bringhurst Park -- City of Wilmington , 1931-1936   [Box III.3 F81]

Edward Bringhurst V and Mary Bringhurst made a gift of forty acres of woodland from the Bringhurst estate to the City of Wilmington in 1931, as cited by the Board of Park Commissioners, Wilmington.

Real estate on Shipley and Talley Roads and Washington Street Extension , 1931-1950   [Box III.3 F82]

Includes correspondence concerning Delaware Power & Light Company's right of way across Bringhurst property. Folder contains a blueprint cadastral map and cloth tracing of land sold to unknown recipients. Also includes a 1942 topographic map of Wilmington, part of the United States Department of Interior's geological survey begun in 1882. The topographical map was produced by J. L. Smith Co. Maps, 1603 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

General correspondence regarding real estate , 1959-1976   [Box III.3 F83]

General correspondence and notes regarding disposition of Rockwood property , 1965-1972   [Box III.3 F84]

Appraisals and valuation of Bringhurst estate , 1965-1969   [Box III.3 F85]

Appraisals and valuations for taxation and development proposal valuations. Includes: "An Appraisal of the Mary T. Bringhurst Estate Located in Brandywine Hundred, New Castle County, Delaware," requested by the Bank of Delaware as of April 1, 1965, by John S. Mason; the "Patterson-Tingle-Goldsborough report," October 11, 1966; and later documents.

New Castle County condemnation for sanitary sewer right of way , 1954, 1965   [Box III.3 F86]

One oversize plan of the condemnation for the sanitary sewer right of way removed to Oversize Map folder "Modern land surveys."

I-95 Freeway report on Delaware state highway taking through lands of Mary T. Bringhurst , 1965   [Box III.3 F87]

Prepared by Howard L. Robertson, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors, for Bank of Delaware.

Masonic Hall Company of Wilmington purchase agreement for 12 acres of land , 1969   [Box III.3 F88]

Purchase agreement for 12 acres of land having frontage on Rockwood or Talley Road and being bounded on the north by the B.&O. Railroad and Interstate 95.

Option from Hargraves to Clarence Burris & Sons, Inc. , 1970   [Box III.3 F89]

Hargraves-Farnum profit sharing disagreement , 1965   [Box III.3 F90]

Family disagreements arose relating to the profit sharing between sisters Nancy Sellers Hargraves and Edith Sellers Farnum from the State of Delaware condemnation of 38.33 acres of land for an interstate highway (I-95) in 1965. This condemnation was Civil Action 3045, 1965, Superior Court, New Castle County.

Hargraves-Farnum profit sharing disagreement , 1966-1970   [Box III.3 F91]

This folder contains continuing correspondence and legal documents regarding the profit sharing dispute. The Bank of Delaware, executor of the Estate of Mary T. Bringhurst, brought suit against Nancy Sellers Hargraves and Edith Sellers Hargraves to settle the disagreement. This was Civil Action 2509, in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware in and for New Castle County.

John Biggs, Jr., v. City of Wilmington, Bank of Delaware, Nancy Hargraves, Edith Farnum , 1968   [Box III.3 F92]

Civil Action 2477 in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware in and for New Castle County: Biggs, Trustee under two indentures executed by Mary T. Bringhurst and Edward Bringhurst V., v. The City of Wilmington, etc.

Bringhurst Woods -- Howard L. Robertson site analysis , 1968   [Box III.3 F93] (Items removed to SPEC MSS oversize box (18 inches) and oversize mapcases.)

Howard L. Robertson, Inc., registered professional engineers and land surveyors, prepared a detailed site analysis for "Bringhurst property" in 1968. Documents, correspondence, and a copy of the report are found in six folders housed in oversize box (18 inches) and oversize half-map.

Bringhurst Woods -- exploratory sketches , 1973-1974   [Box III.3 F94]

Exploratory sketches for Bringhurst Woods, Carr Road, and Interstate I-95 Items removed to Oversize Map.

Bringhurst Woods -- options and proposals , 1970-1975   [Box III.3 F95]

Correspondence and documents with Nancy and Gordon Hargraves regarding proposals related to 23.5 acres of "Bringhurst Woods" near Carr Road and Shipley Roads.

Bringhurst Clinic , 1971   [Box III.3 F96]

New Castle County Department of Planning proposed zoning classification, newsclippings, and exploratory sketch for planned commercial development of Bringhurst estate property. Clippings and exploratory sketches removed to Oversize MAP folder.

New Castle County Department of Parks and Recreation , 1971-1975   [Box III.3 F97]

Correspondence with Gordon Hargraves regarding acquisition of the Bringhurst Estate (Rockwood Manor and property) as a "historical-regional park."

Gift to New Castle County - Civil Action 4313 , 1973-1975   [Box III.3 F98]

The gift of Rockwood to New Castle County included complicated negotiations and Civil Action 4313, Bank of Delaware, et al., v. Gordon Hargraves, et al., in which Gordon Hargraves sought to make "a gift of Rockwood Manor House together with surrounding grounds and an easement by necessity of ingress and egress, to New Castle County under Article Fourth of decedent's [Nancy Hargraves] will." The County agreed to accept the Rockwood Manor House and surrounding grounds according to a Plan filed in the Court of Chancery (August 28, 1974) on October 11, 1974.

New Castle County Loan agreement with Gordon Hargraves for personal property , 1975   [Box III.3 F99]

Shipley - Bringhurst - Hargraves museum , 1975-1976   [Box III.3 F100]

News clippings and brochures related to donation of Rockwood, "the old Bringhurst mansion," and 6.2 acres of land a 30-foot easement for the driveway to Shipley Road. Includes invitation and program for the museum dedication, September 23, 1976.

Rockwood Museum Advisory Committee , 1975-1978   [Box III.3 F101]

Includes letters from Ralph S. Cryder, Director of New Castle County Parks and Recreation, and others.

Roof renovation and related work for New Castle County Department of Parks and Recreation for Rockwood Museum , 1979   [Box III.3 F102]

Detailed plans and elevations by Day & Zimmerman Associates, architects, engineers, planners, Philadelphia. The architects were contracted to keep many of the unique features of Rockwood intact: "Existing dinner bell to remain. Make all connections to roof and rope hole watertight. Rebuild roof hatches to match existing openings. Rebuild skylights." Housed in Oversize Map.

New Castle County Planning Guide , 1966   [Box III.3 F103]

A photograph of Rockwood was included in this county publication.

Oversize drawings of Rockwood property surveys , circa 1890-1948   [Box III.3 F104]

Property surveys from 1926, 1936, 1941, 1946, 1947, 1948, and undated (circa 1890s). Housed in Oversize Half Map.

Exploratory sketch for minor subdivision of Rockwood , 1969   [Box III.3 F105] (Housed in SPEC MSS oversize mapcases)

Done for owner Nancy Sellers Hargraves by Howard L. Robertson. Housed in Oversize Half Map.

"Modern" land surveys and plans , circa 1953-1971   [Box III.3 F106]

Also includes removal from F86, "Plan of condemnation for sanitary sewer right of way, 1965."

Subgroup IV. Photographs, albums, sheet music, magazines, and objects

Series IV.A. Photographs , circa 1840-1976

The photographs series of the family papers, circa 1840-1980 (bulk dates 1880-1935), comprises approximately ten thousand photos created and kept by the extended Bringhurst family and contains examples of early photographic processes, historic original prints, and later prints developed from original negatives.

The bulk of the photographs in this collection were generated by the family of Edward Bringhurst, Jr. and Anna James Webb Bringhurst and their descendants, the generations who acquired the Rockwood mansion from the estate of its builder, Joseph Shipley, and lived there continuously from 1892 until the property was donated to New Castle County in the mid-1970s. Edward Bringhurst, Jr. (1835-1912) was born shortly before the invention of photography. Given the comprehensive documentation of this multi-generational family archive, virtually every historic type of photography is represented in Series IV.A.: daguerreotypes, tintypes, cyanotypes, cartes-de-visite, albumen prints, and later processes. The Bringhurst family photographs include studio portraits; domestic scenes of family, friends, and servants; popular photography of recreation and social events; travel photography across the United States and abroad in Europe, especially in Ireland; scenic photography of the Rockwood property and Kilwaughter Castle in Larne Ireland (home of Elizabeth Bringhurst Galt-Smith); and artistic photography by Edward Bringhurst III/V, an accomplished amateur who participated in Wilmington salons organized by the Delaware Camera Club in 1934 and 1935.

Subseries IV.A.1 Loose boxed photographs , circa 1840-1976

The loose boxed photgraphs are numbered sequentially from pb001-pb124. There are no boxes for the following numbers: 73, 87-107, and 119.

Joseph Shipley, Jr., and Edward Bringhurst, Sr., generational relatives , 1840-1900   [Box pb001]

Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna James Webb Bringhurst generational relatives , 1849-1920   [Box pb002]

Edward Bringhurst, Jr., and Anna James Webb Bringhurst generational relatives , 1900-1915   [Box pb003]

Anna James Webb Bringhurst friends and family , 1890-1905   [Box pb004]

Edward Bringhurst III/V , 1885-1920   [Box pb005]

Edward Bringhurst III/V , 1880   [Box pb006]

Edward Bringhurst III/V , 1892-1938   [Box pb007]

Mary Thomas Bringhurst , 1880-1950   [Box pb008]

Mary Thomas Bringhurst , 1875-1910   [Box pb009]

Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith ["Bessie"] and John Galt-Smith , 1866-1925   [Box pb010]

Elizabeth Shipley Bringhurst Galt-Smith ["Bessie"] and John Galt-Smith , 1916   [Box pb011]

Anna "Nancy" Bringhurst Sellers , 1900-1902   [Box pb012]

Anna "Nancy" Bringhurst Sellers and Edith Claypoole Sellers , 1900-1910   [Box pb013]

Anna "Nancy" Bringhurst Sellers-- up to adulthood , 1910   [Box pb014]

Anna "Nancy" Bringhurst Sellers and Sellers family , 1899-1901   [Box pb015]

Sellers and Hargraves family and friends , 1918-1954   [Box pb016]

Edith Ferris Bringhurst Sellers , 1884-1945   [Box pb017]

Group photographs of family and friends , 1893`1957   [Box pb018]

Group photographs of family and friends , 1885-1960   [Box pb019]

Friends of family , 1905-1955   [Box pb020]

Friends of family , 1905-1920   [Box pb021]

Servants , 1904   [Box pb022]

Rockwood interiors, first floor , 1892-1979   [Box pb023]

Rockwood interiors, first floor , circa 1892-1976   [Box pb023a]

Rockwood interiors, second floor , 1892-1935   [Box pb024]

Rockwood conservatory , 1890-1903   [Box pb025]

Rockwood exteriors, north façade , 1900-1981   [Box pb026]

Rockwood exteriors, south facade , 1885-1978   [Box pb027]

Rockwood landscapes, north lawn , 1900-1978   [Box pb028]

Rockwood landscapes, north lawn , 1890-1968   [Box pb029]

Rockwood landscapes, other , 1892-1930   [Box pb030]

Rockwood landscapes, south lawn , 1905-1975   [Box pb031]

Rockwood outbuildings , 1900-1978   [Box pb032]

Wyncote and The Cliffs , circa 1890   [Box pb033]

Aerial views of Rockwood , 1930-1975   [Box pb034]

Rockwood dolls and boats , circa 1900-1917   [Box pb035]

Kilwaughter portraits , 1892-1914   [Box pb036]

Kilwaughter , 1890-1912   [Box pb037]

Kilwaughter interiors , circa 1892-1895   [Box pb038]

Kilwaughter exteriors , circa 1892-1913   [Box pb039]

Dogs , circa 1900-1920   [Box pb040]

Dogs , 1910   [Box pb041]

Dogs , 1904   [Box pb042]

Dogs , circa 1900-1931   [Box pb043]

Dogs , circa 1900-1931   [Box pb044]

New York residence, Philadelphia, Cape May , 1888-1900   [Box pb045]

United States travel , 1906-1916   [Box pb046]

United States travel , 1905-1907   [Box pb047]

United States travel , 1904-1911   [Box pb048]

United States travel , 1900   [Box pb049]

Caribbean , 1910   [Box pb050]

Caribbean , 1910   [Box pb051]

Caribbean , 1910   [Box pb052]

Canada , 1900   [Box pb053]

Ireland , 1912-1937   [Box pb054]

Group photographs of family and friends , 1912-1922   [Box pb055]

Scotland , 1912-1939   [Box pb056]

England and Scotland , 1912-1913   [Box pb057]

Scotland , 1912-1913   [Box pb057a]

Scotland , 1899-1911   [Box pb058]

France , 1900   [Box pb059]

France , 1900   [Box pb060]

Italy , 1900   [Box pb061]

Italy , 1900   [Box pb062]

Italy , 1900   [Box pb063]

Germany , 1905   [Box pb064]

Germany , 1905   [Box pb064a]

Germany , 1904-1905   [Box pb065]

Germany , 1904-1905   [Box pb065a]

Germany , 1904   [Box pb066]

France , undated   [Box pb067]

Italy , 1900   [Box pb068]

Germany , 1905   [Box pb069]

Germany , 1905   [Box pb069a]

Austria , 1905   [Box pb070]

Austria , 1905   [Box pb070a]

France , undated   [Box pb071]

Holland and Belgium , undated   [Box pb072]

Transit in United States and Europe , 1912-1913   [Box pb074]

Unidentified travel , 1900-1933   [Box pb075]

France , 1900   [Box pb076]

Germany souvenir photographs and cabinet cards , 1900-1910   [Box pb077]

Bringhurst family and friends, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes , 1850-1920   [Box pb078]

Wyncote daguerreotype , circa 1850   [Box pb079]

Daguerreotypes and ambrotypes of Edward Bringhurst, Jr.'s generation , circa 1850-1880   [Box pb080]

Daguerreotypes and ambrotypes of Edward Bringhurst, Jr.'s generation , circa 1840-1863   [Box pb081]

Edward Bringhurst III/V portraits , 1895-1911   [Box pb082]

Studio portraits , 1858-1930   [Box pb083]

Hargraves studio portraits , 1905-1950   [Box pb084]

Rockwood south facade , undated   [Box pb084a]

Oversized portraits , undated   [Box pb085]

Salon photographs by Edward Bringhurst III/V , 1934   [Box pb086]

United States travel , undated   [Box pb0108]

United States travel , 1911-1913   [Box pb0109]

Germany and Austria , 1900   [Box pb0110]

France , undated   [Box pb0111]

Switzerland , 1905   [Box pb0112]

Switzerland , 1905   [Box pb0112a]

Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and prints of Edward Bringhurst, Jr.'s generation , circa 1840-1863   [Box pb0113]

Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and silhouettes , circa 1850-1920   [Box pb0114]

Daguerreotypes Joseph Shipley, Jr., to Sarah Shipley Bringhurst generations , circa 1840-1860   [Box pb0115]

Transportation , undated   [Box pb0116]

Oversized photographs of Rockwood, aerial, and other , undated   [Box pb0118]

European trip panoramas , 1904-1905   [Box pb0120]

European trip panoramas , 1904-1905   [Box pb0120a]

Panoramas , 1904   [Box pb0121]

Detail prints of cameras , undated   [Box pb0122]

Photographs donated by various family members , undated   [Box pb0123]

Miscellaneous: Europe, United States, Rockwood , undated   [Box pb0124]

Series IV.B. Sheet music , 1874-1916

The sheet music series, 1889-1920 (bulk dates 1905-1917), represents a selection that might best be described as coming from "the Bringhurst family parlor piano bench." The music dates from the period of Edward Bringhurst's family's residency in Rockwood and reflects home entertainment and family study of music that would have been performed on the piano or other instruments. There are seven sub-series of sheet music: popular music, music for mandolin and banjo, professional music, G. Schirmer's octavo church music, pedagogical material, and music for piano and piano forte. Much of the material bears the name of Matilda W. Duyckinck (Mrs. Horace M. Duyckinck), a music instructor from nearby Elkton, Maryland. There is a final sub-series of miscellany: one folder of music fragments and a music portfolio with its inside cover showing a listing of music selections with notes about tempo (F38).

Subseries IV.B.1. Popular music , 1892-1916, undated

Absence makes the heart grow fonder / New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1900   [Box M1 F1]

Words by Arthur Gillespie; music by Herbert Dillea. Sung with immense success by the favorite vocalist Harry Talley.

A frangesa! / New York : Enterprise Music Supply Company , undated   [Box M1 F1]

March by Mario Costa. Cover art: Dewey.

Adelaide, polka mazurka / Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company   [Box M1 F1]

L. Gobbbaerts, Op. 109. Bromo Seltzer Edition

All coons look alike to me / New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1896   [Box M1 F1]

A darkey misunderstanding written and composed by Ernest Hogan.

Always me/ New York : Chas K. Harris , 1908   [Box M1 F1]

By Chas K. Harris.

Always speak of others as you'd have them speak of you/ Erie : Brehm Brothers , 1902   [Box M1 F1]

Songs with Waltz Chorus. Music by Otto M. Heinzman. Words by John A. Heinzman. Sung with great success by Lydia Barry of Felix & Barry. Portrait of Lydia Barry.

Arno (Italian water scene)/ Philadelphia : Hollywood Music Company , 1905   [Box M1 F1]

Intermezzo for the pianoforte. By William Fletcher.

Attractive pieces for young pianists/ New York : G. Schirmer. , 1894   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

Spinning Song. By Albert Ellemenreich. Cover art: Edward B. Edwards des.

Automobiling/ Philadelphia : F. Collis Wildman , 1905   [Box M1 F1]

Words and music by F. Collis Wildman. A song of the day!

Blue bell/ New York : F. B. Haviland Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M1 F2]

March song and chorus by Madden and Horse. Portrait of Jeanette Dupree

Ben bolt/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F2]

Melody by Nelcon Kneass. Bromo Seltzer Edition

Butterfly waltz/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F2]

Valse des papillons. By G. Ludovic, Op. 108. Bromo Seltzer Edition

By Normandie's blue hills/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F2]

Cilfton Binghorn, H. Trotere. Bromo Seltzer Edition

Carlotta/ Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1915   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

Valse. By G. A. Quiros

Club march/ Brattleboro, Vermont : The Estey Organ Company , 1907   [Box M1 F2]

By J. Wesley Hughes.

Compositions for the piano/ New York : Oliver Ditson Company , 1892   [Box M1 F2]

By Louis Moreau Gottschalk.

Cupid's garden/ New York : T. B. Harms & Co. , 1904   [Box M1 F2]

Song Intermezzo, by Max C. Eugene. Cover art: Vivian Valdaire, 1901

Dearie/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Co. , 1905   [Box M1 F2]

As sung by Miss Sallie Fisher of the Frank Daniel's Company in Charles Dillingham's production of the musical farce: "Seargant Brue." By Clare Kummer. Portrait of Sallie Fisher. Portrait of Clare Kummer.

A Dream/ New York : Oliver Ditson Company , 1895   [Box M1 F2]

Music by J. C. Bartlett. Words by Chas. B. Cory. Songs by J. C. Bartlett.

Do they think of me at home?/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd 1917

Words by J. E. Carpenter. Music by C. W. Glover. Bromo Seltzer Edition

Every day is sunshine when the heart beats true/ New York : Jos. W. stern & Co. , 1902   [Box M1 F3]

Words by Chas Horwitz. Music by Fredrick V. Bowers. Sung with great success by Fred'K V. Bowers in Dockstader's Minstrels. Portrait of Charles Horwitz. Portrait of Frederick V. Bowers. Portrait of the Favorite Tenor Fred V. Bowers.

Famous marches arranged for the piano/ New York : G Schirmer , undated   [Box M1 F3]

Cover sheet. Songs by Chopin, Beethoven, Erkel, Mendelssohn, Sodermann, Llenick, Gounod, Raff, Clark, Wagner, Bizet, Schubert, Strauss, Verdi, Berlioz, Meyerbeer

Fifty miles from Boston/ New York : F. A. Mills , 1907   [Box M1 F3]

Cohan & Harris's Comedian's present Geo. M. Cohan's Latest musical play. Songs of the Play: Jack and Jill, A small-Town Gal, Harringan, Ain't it Awful, The Brookfield Two Step.

Flee as a bird/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F3]

4 copies together

Mrs. M. S. B. Dana. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

From my sketch book/ Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1913   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd 1917

Nine melodious pianoforte pieces. By A. Sartorio.

Garden of Eden waltzes/ Oshkosh, WI: Bauer Brothers Music Company , undated   [Box M1 F3]

By. C. F. Bauer. "The Gypsy's Dream Waltzes" by A.W. and F.C. Bauer. Portrait of C.F. Bauer

Gathered flowers/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F3]

Music by S. Glover. Vocal duet. Bromo Seltzer Edition

The Gondolier/ New York : Shapiro, Remick and Company , 1904   [Box M1 F3]

Words by Harry Williams. Music by W.C. Powell. Cover art: Gene Buck

Good-bye, good luck, God bless you/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1916   [Box M1 F3]

Ballad. Words by J. Keirn Brennan. Music by Ernest R. Ball

Go on and coax me/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M1 F3]

Harry von Tilzer's greatest novelty hit. Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von tilzer. Portrait of Harry von Tilzer, our trade mark. Portrait of Grace Cameron(?). Cover art: Jenkhts(?)

Has another won your heart?/ New York : Consolidated Music Publishers Associated , 1899   [Box M1 F4]

The most beautiful ballad of the year. Sung by Ida Marie Rogers. Music by Seymour Furth. Words by E. Nattes. Sole selling agents Shapiro, Bernstein & von Tilzer. Portrait of Ida Marie Rogiers.

How'd you like to spoon with me?/ New York : T.B. Harms Company , 1905   [Box M1 F4]

The song success of the Shubert Bros latest English musical comedy "The Earl and the Girl." Written by Edward Laska. Composed by Jerome D. Kern. Sung by Miss Georgia Caine and Mr. Victor Morely. Portrait of Miss Georgia Caine.

If you must love someone won't you please love me?/ Philadelphia : H. A. Weymann & Son , 1908   [Box M1 F4]

Words by J.E. Dempsey. Music by Johann C. Schmid

I'll be your rain-beau/ New York : Sol-Bloom , 1902   [Box M1 F4]

Introduced and sung by Miss Emma Carus in A. H. Chamberlyn's production, "The Defender." Words by Ed Gardenier. Music by J. Fred Helf. Portrait of Emma Carus. Cover art: Frew

I love you all the time/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1904   [Box M1 F4]

Sung with great success by Hattie Williams in Charles Frohman and Geo. Edwardes' presentation of the musical comedy The Girl from Kays. Popular song and chorus. Words and music by Will R. Anderson.

I'm a lady/ New York : The Rogers Brothers Music Publishing Company , 1902   [Box M1 F4]

Lyric by Ed. Gardenier. Music by Maurice Levi. Successfully sung by Hattie Williams in the Rogers Brothers latest comedy "In Harvard" by John J. McNally. Portrait of Hattie Williams. Cover art: Starmer.

In glory he ascendeth/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1893   [Box M1 F5]

Words by Rev. Phillipps Brooks, D. D. Music by Geo. M. Vickers. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

Intermezzo/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F5]

2 copies together

From Cavalleria Rusticana. By P. Mascagni.

In the good old summertime/ New York : Howley, Haviland and Dresser. , 1902   [Box M1 F5]

Waltz song. Words by Ren Shields. Music by George Evans "The Honey Boy." As sung in A. H. Chamberlyn's latest musical extravaganza "The Defender" by Miss Blanche Ring. Portrait of Blanche Ring.

In the shade of the old apple tree/ New York : Jerome H. Remick and Company , 1905   [Box M1 F5]

Words by Harry Williams. Music by Egbery van Alstyne. Portrait of Avery Strakosch.

In Zanzibar/ New York : Shapiro, Remick and Company , 1904   [Box M1 F5]

As introduced by Emma Carus in Fisher & Riley's musical comedy "The Medal and the Maid." Words by Will D. Cobb. Music by Gus Edwards. Portrait of Emma Carus.

It happened in Nordland/ New York : m. Witmark & Sons , 1904   [Box M1 F5]

Lew Fields' Stock Co. Produced under Julian Mitchell. Books and Lyrics by Glen MacDonough. Music by Victor Herbert.

It is better to laugh than be sighing/ Philadelphia, PA: United News Company , 1903   [Box M1 F5]

Supplement to the North American Philadelphia Old Song Series, section four. Sunday, September 20 1903. Composed by Donizetti. Translated by G. Linley.

Just as the sun went down/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1898   [Box M1 F6]

A pathetic incident of war time. Words & Music by Lyn Udall.

Just some one/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1907   [Box M1 F6]

Sung with great success by Maude Lambert in Kolb Dill's Lonesome Town. Words and music by Will R. Anderson. Portrait of Maude Lambert

Keep a little cosy corner in your heart for me/ New York : F. B. Haviland Publishing Company , 1905   [Box M1 F6]

Dedicated to Mrs. George S. Davis. Words by Jack Drislane. Music by Theodore Morse. Portrait of Effie Brooklin.

Klavier bibliothek/ Brussel: Breitkopf & Hartel , undated   [Box M1 F6]

Breitkopf & Hartel's Editions, The Pianist's Library (In English and French). Conrad Kuhner. Votrags-Album. Ausgewahlte Stucke moderner Komponisten fur den Unterricht und Votrag mit erganzenden Bezeichnungen versehen und nach steigenden Schwierigkeitsgraden geordnet. Cover art: Wanderer. Kassberg & Oertel

Listen to the mockingbird/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1897   [Box M1 F6]

Original Version. By Alice Hawthorne (Spetimus winner). Bromo Seltzer Edition.

Listen to the mockingbird/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1897   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd 1917

Original version. By Alice Hawthorne (Spetimus winner). Bromo Seltzer Edition.

A man, a maid, a moon, a boat/ New York : Chas K. Harris , 1908   [Box M1 F7]

by Chas K. Harris. Cover art: Scott & Van Altena

The Mansion of Aching Hearts/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1902   [Box M1 F7]

Words by Arthur J. Lamb. Music by Harry von Tilzer. Sung with great success by Nicholas Wright. Portrait of Nicholas Wright.

Miniature Classics/ Philadelphia, PA: Theodore Presser , 1897   [Box M1 F7]

Boy's Dance by N. W. Gade. Op. 36, No. 3. Two Little Fairy Tales by C. Reinecke. Op. 147.

Musical pastime/ Philadelphia : Lee & Walker, WM, H. Boner and Company , undated   [Box M1 F7]

A choice selection of solos for the violin by Sep. Winner.

My coal black lady/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1896   [Box M1 F8]

Symphony de Ethiopia. Written and Composed by. W. T. Jefferson. Sung with Tremendous Success by the Clever Comedienne Lizzie B. Raymond. Portrait of Lizzie Raymond.

My Hannah lady whose black baby is you?/ New York : Jos W. Stern and Company , 1899   [Box M1 F8]

Words and music by Dave Reed Jr. Portrait of Dave Reed Jr. portrait of Jas Tenbrooke. Portrait of Larry Dooley.

My old Kentucky home, good-night/ New York : WM. A. Pond & Company , 1894   [Box M1 F8]

As sung by Christy's Minstrels. Written and composed by Stephen C. Foster.

New mown hay/ New York : Continental Music Company , 1902   [Box M1 F8]

Intermezzo for piano. By Jason V. Mathews. Cover art: Starmer.

Not because your hair is curly/ New York : Victor Kremer Company , 1906   [Box M1 F8]

Words and music by Bob Adams. Johnny Fogarty's big hit in His Higness the Bey. Cover art: Henrich.

Old favorites/ New York : McKinley Music Company , undated   [Box M1 F9]

Collection of music by Burgmuller, Resch, Anderson, Krausse, Wilson, Wyman, Herzog, Morrison, Lowithan, Brunner, D'Albert, Reissiger, Beethoven, Sinnengen, Polla.

Old Limerick town/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1902   [Box M1 F9]

Chauncey Olcott's Song Successes in his new production. By Augstus Pitou (manager). Portrait of Chauncey Olcott.

The Old oaken bucket / Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F9]

Bromo Seltzer Edition.

Our United States (Kentucky, Maryland, Tennessee, Mississippi, Ohio, New York,)/ Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1915   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

Characteristic pieces for the pianoforte. Introducing well-known American folk songs. By Geo. L. Spaulding.

Piano pieces/ Philadelphia : Hatch Music Company , 1897   [Box M1 F9]

By Richard Goerdeler.

Quaker lady/ Philadelphia : Two W's Welch and Wilsky Music Publishers , 1908   [Box M1 F9]

Lyrics by Bobby Heath. Melody by Gus. A. Benkhart. A New Kind of Song. Portrait of Bobby Heath. Portrait of Gus. A. Benkhart. Portrait of E. J. Welch. Portrait of A. Wilsky.

Red, white, and blue/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F9]

Arranged by Frank L. Armstrong. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

Rollicking girl/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons , 1905   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

Chas. Frohman presents Sam Bernard in the musical comedy. By Sydney Rosenfeld. Music by W. T. Francis. Cover art: Edgar Keller.

Roses bring dreams of you/ New York : Shapiro Music Publisher , 1908   [Box M1 F9]

Words and music by Herbert Ingraham. Portrait of Netta Vesta. Cover art: Starmer.

Roses without thorns/ Philadelphia, PA: Thodore Presser Company , 1910   [Box M1 F9]

Six treble clef pieces for piano. By A. Sartorio. OP. 863.

Sack waltz/ New York : De Luxe Music Company , undated   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

By John A. Metcalf.

She's sleeping by the silv'ry Rio Grande/ New York : Howley, Haviland & Dresser , 1902   [Box M1 F10]

Words by Thomas J. Hughes. Music by Chas. Kohlman.

She was bred in old Kentucky/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1898   [Box M1 F10]

Charming ballad sentiment introduced by the Famous American Artist Lottie Gilson. Also sung with great success by every well known vocalist and quarette before the public. Words by Harry Braisted. Music by Stanley Carter. A first-night hit, with yours very truly, Lottie Gilson. Portrait of Lottie Gilson.

The Sleeping beauty and the beast/ New York : Howley, Haviland & Dresser. , 1901   [Box M1 F10]

The only original "Dinah Song." Songs sung in the Klaw and Erlanger's production of the Drury Lane extravaganza "The Sleeping Beauty and the Best." Staged under direction of Ben Teal. Words by Bob Cole and J. W. Johnson. Music by Rosamond Johnson.

Somebody just like you/ Philadelphia : H.A. Weymann & Son , 1908   [Box M1 F10]

Music by Johann C. Schmid. Lyric by Chas. E, Baer.

The Song that I hear in my dreams/ Boston : The Georgem Kney Company Music Publishers , 1902   [Box M1 F10]

Words and music by Walter Rolfe. Successfully sung by Jos. A. Callahan. Portrait of Jos. A. Callahan by Conlin, photo - Boston.

Spring song/ New York : Shapiro, Remick and Company , 1904   [Box M1 F10]

By James O'Dea. Vocal edition of Mendelssohn's Spring Song with modern words. Cover art: Starmer.

Springtime/ New York : Century Music Publishing Company , 1910   [Box M1 F11]

Waltz. By Louis Tocaben.

Starlight polka/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1884   [Box M1 F11]

By Pemberton Pierce. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

The Star-spangled banner/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F11]

Words by Francis Scott Key. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

The Story of a faded flower/ Boston : Aetna Music Publishing Company , 1908   [Box M1 F11]

Words and music by Ben Ritchie. Portrait of Grace Mordaunt.

The Sweetest girl of all/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1895   [Box M1 F11]

Waltz song. Words and music by John Winsler Hayes. Bromo Seltzer Edition

The Sweetest girl of all/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1895   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

Waltz song. Words and music by John Winsler Hayes. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

The Sweetest story ever told (Tell me, do you love me?)/ New York : Oliver Ditson Company , 1892   [Box M1 F11]

The latest success. Written and composed by R. M. Stults. Cover art: Ged. H. Wlaker & Co. Lith. Boston.

Take back the heart/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917. 2 copies

Claribel. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

Tell me, dusky maiden/ New York : Howley, Haviland & Dresser , 1901   [Box M1 F11]

(A Travesty.) Words by J. W. Johnson and Bob Cole. Music by Rosamond Johnson.

Ten five note recreations/ Philadelphia, PA: Theodore Presser Company , 1914   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

For the piantoforte. By C. W. Krogmann.

Tone stories/ Philadelphia, PA: theodore Presser Company , 1910   [Box M1 F14]

Glued into Saturday Evening Post, June 23rd, 1917

For boys and girls to play and sing. Words by Olive Hall. Music by Daniel Rowe.

The Troubles of the reuban and the maid/ New York : The Rogers Brothers Music Publishing Company , 1902   [Box M1 F11]

Lyric by J. Chever Goodwin. Music by Maurice Levi. The Cyclonic Success in the Rogers Brothers latest farce "In Harvard." Cover art: Starmer.

Under a Panama/ New York : Whitney Warner Publishing Company , 1903   [Box M1 F12]

Words by Vincent Bryan. Music by J. B. Mullen.

Under the Anheuser Bush/ New York : Harry von Tilzer publishing Company , 1903   [Box M1 F12]

Music by Harry von Tilzer. Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Portrait of Harry von Tilzer "our trademark." Portrait of Harry S. Stanley.

Venetian boat song/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F12]

Written by Herman C. Merivale. Music by Jacques Blumenthal. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

The Warmest baby in the bunch/ New York : George L. Spaulding , 1897   [Box M1 F12]

Ethiopian ditty. Words and Music by George M. Cohan. Cover art: Davids.

Way down yonder in the cornfield/ New York : F.A. Mills Incorporated Music Publishing Company , 1901   [Box M1 F12]

The famous Alabama song ending with the refrain "I Saw a Field of Cotton." By Cobb & Edwards. Sung with great success by Evelyn Fonner. Portrait of Evelyn Fonner.

What the brass band played/ New York : F. B. Haviland Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M1 F13]

Words by Jack Drislane. Music by Theodore Morse. Also published as a march and two step for mandolin. Portrait of Mount City Quartette. Cover art: Frew.

When life is brightest/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F13]

Words by Chas. J. Rowe. Music by Ciro Pinsuti. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

When the angels have lifted the veil/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , 1885   [Box M1 F13]

Words by Emma Pitt. Music by Pemberton Pierce. Bromo Seltzer Edition.

When you were sweet sixteen/ New York : M. Witmark & Sons. , 1898   [Box M1 F13]

Ballad and Refrain. Words and music by James Thornton. Sung with great success by Bonnie Thornton. Also sung with great success by Melene Mora. Portrait of Bonnie Thornton. Portrait of Melene Mora.

Whoa Bill!/ New York : Shapiro, Bernstein, and von Tilzer. , 1901   [Box M1 F13]

A country characteristic for piano. By Harry von Tilzer.

Why?/ Philadelphia : Willard Spenser , 1901   [Box M1 F13]

From the pastoral comedy opera Miss Bob White. Words and music by Willard Spenser. Cover art: Wilfred Buckland

Will you dance with me Sally?/ Baltimore : Emerson Drug Company , undated   [Box M1 F13]

To S. R. B. Moderato espressivo. By Irving Cohen. Bromo Seltzer Edition

Why don't you try?/ New York : Jerome H. Remick & Company , 1905   [Box M1 F13]

Or "The Rolling Chair Song". The song hit in "The Belle of Avenue A". Words by Harry Williams. Words by Egbert van Alstyne. Portrait of Maude Earl. Cover art: De Talacs

You can't give your heart to somebody else and still hold hands with me/ New York : Gus Edwards Music Publishing Company , 1906   [Box M1 F13]

Lyric by leo Wood. Music by Leo Edwards. Cover art: Etherington

Subseries IV.B.2. Music for Mandolin and Banjo , 1891-1902, undated

Beneath my lady's window/ Philadelphia, PA: Theodore Presser , 1895   [Box M2 F15]

By F. Brandeis. Resound my mandolin.

Espanita/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1896   [Box M2 F15]

Spanish Waltzes by George Rosey. The latest by the composer of the famous Honeymoon March. Cover art: From "Art and Artists".

Eureka method for the mandolin/ Boston : Oliver Ditson Company , 1891   [Box M2 F15]

Latest and best of all instructors. By Winner.

Happy days in Dixie/ New York : F. A. Mills Music Publisher , 1896   [Box M2 F16]

Popular Mandolin, Banjo, and Guitar Music

Two step march. By Kerry Mills.

I'd leave ma happy home for you/ New York : F. A. Mills Music Publish4er , 1899   [Box M2 F16]

Popular Mandolin, Banjo, and Guitar Music

By Harry von Tilzer. Arranged by Louis Tocaben.

The International mandolin, guitar, and banjo studies/ Milwaukee, WI: Wm. C. Stahl , 1902   [Box M2 F16]

By. P. W. Newton. For class or individual study. Mandolin book 1.

King carnival march, New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1896   [Box M2 F16]

By George Rosey. Two-step.

The Latsest popular banjo, mandolin, and guitar music/ Denver, CO: De Harport Brothers. , 1892   [Box M2 F16]

Composed and arranged by Theodore and Horatio De Harport brothers.

Madolin and guitar folio no. 1/ New Yokr: Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1897   [Box M2 F17]

Mandolin Solo. By Mark Stern. Arranged by Louis Tocaben

Melody in F. / Cinncinati, OH: J. C. Groene & Company , 1895   [Box M2 F17]

Favorite mandolin orchestra selections

A. Rubenstein. Arranged by Wm Foden.

Method for Mandolin/ New York : White Smith Music Publishing Company , undated   [Box M2 F18]

By F. deCristofaro. Full english text by Ambrose Davenport. Volume 1.

A Night off/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1898   [Box M2 F19]

March and Two-step. By George Rosey. Portrait of George Rosey. Picture of "Her night off". Picture of "His night off".

Oriental echoes/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1895   [Box M2 F19]

March and two-step. By George Rosey. A Happy Inspiration. Mirth and Melody.

Rastus on parade/ New York : F. A. Mills Music Publisher , 1895   [Box M2 F9]

Popular Mandolin, Banjo, and Guitar Music

Two step march. By Kerry Mills.

The Slippery Quaker Dorothy waltzes/ Philadelphia : Paul Eno Publisher , 1897   [Box M2 F19]

Success of the century. Grotesque Patrol. Catchy Melodys. Pretty Harmony. A brilliant composition by Richard L. Weaver.

The Spirit of liberty/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1898   [Box M2 F19]

Composed by George Rosey. March and Two-step. Arranged by Vincent Leon.

The Tennessee jubilee/ New York : Jos. W. Stern & Company , 1899   [Box M2 F20]

Characteristic southern march and cake walk. Composed by H. R. Stern. "A Senegambian rag-time hit."

Varsity club march/ unknown: J. A. Le Barge , 1895   [Box M2 F20]

By J. A. Le Barge.

Wein bleibt wein march/ Cincinnati, OH: J. C. Groene & Company , undated   [Box M2 F20]

Favorite mandolin orchestra selections

Aranged by C. Henlein.

Whistling Rufus/ New York : F. A. Mills Music Publisher , 1899   [Box M2 F20]

Popular Mandolin, Banjo, and Guitar Music

A characteristic two step march. By Kerry Mills.

Subseries IV.B.3. Professional music , 1902-1904

Alexander/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Andrew Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Back, back, back to Baltimore/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Harry H. Williams. Music by Egbert van Alstyne. Respectfully dedicated to the Kings of Black Face - McIntyre & Heath.

But I was dreaming/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words and music by Ed. Rogers.

Come down McGinty/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words and music by Ed. Rogers .

D-i-s! p-o-s! z-e-s! means move/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Ernest Hogan. Music by Jas. T. Bryman.

Down at the baby store/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Alfred Bryan. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Down where the sweet potatoes grow/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Ebenezer Brown/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Farewell, Nellie mine/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F21]

Words by Harry H. Williams. Music by Egbert van Alstyne.

Gone, gone, gone/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by T. J. Farron, Jr. Music by Jos. M. Hollander.

Have you seen Maggie Riley?/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Just a little everloving girl/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Vincent Bryan. Music by J. B. Mullen.

The Man with the dough/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Andrew Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Mariar/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Harry Williams. Music by Mose Gumble

Maydee (pretty south sea island lady)/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1903   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Arthur J. Lamb. Music by Harry von Tilzer

Nobody seems to love me now/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words and music by Joe Maxwell

Seminole/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F22]

Words by Harry H. Williams. Music by Egbert van Alsyne

She's a Yankee Doodle girl/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

Sweet Dora Dell/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Word by Alfred Bryan/ Music by Harry von Tilzer. Respectfully dedicated to Miss Florence Hearst Southwisk.

Sweet Kitty McCoy/ New York : Harry von tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Jas. F. Kelly. Music by WM. J. Vanderveer.

The Tale of the old black crow/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Harry H. Williams. Music by Egbert van Alstyne.

Tell me that beautiful story/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing company , 1902   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Arthur J. Lamb. Music by Albert von Tilzer

Tippecanoe/ New York : Shapiro, Remick & Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Harry H. Williams. Music by Egbert van Alstyne.

Under the Anheuser Bush/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1903   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer.

When frost is on the pumpkin, Maggie dear/ New York : Harry von Tilzer Music Publishing Company , 1904   [Box M2 F23]

Words by Andrew B. Sterling. Music by Harry von Tilzer. Note: A letter sent from a little country village by a faithful lover who is still waiting for "The girl who went to town." She whispered when she said goodbye "I'll be back when the frost is on the pumpkin."

Subseries IV.B.4. G. Shirmer's octavo church music / New York , 1899-1920

943 - I will sing of thy power , 1899   [Box M2 F24]

By Arthur Sullivan. Edited by H. W. Nicholl.

994 - The City of God , 1899   [Box M2 F24]

Hymn-Anthem. Words by Johnson. Music by C. E. van Laer.

1024 - They have taken away my lord , 1900   [Box M2 F24]

By C. W. Harrington. Easter Anthem.

1026 - O come everyone that thirsteth , 1900   [Box M2 F24]

Soprano solo and chorus or quartet. By William Reed.

1027 - Jesus, my saviour! Look on me , 1899   [Box M2 F25]

Anthem. By Geo. B. Nevin. Rev. John Ross Macduff, D. D.

1029 - The Lost sheep , 1900   [Box M2 F25]

" There were ninety and nine." Hymn Anthem. By Myles B. Foster. Elizabeth C. Clephane.

10398 - The Heavens are telling / Presser Co.'s Octavo Choruses , 1920   [Box M2 F25]

By L. van Beethoven.

Subseries IV.B.5. Pedagogical material , 1893-1905, undated

Loschhorn / London : Augener & Company , undated   [Box M2 F26]

Klavier-Technik. Tehcnique du piano- Technical studies. Edition Peters.

The Musical writing book / New York : WM. A. Pond & Company , 1899   [Box M2 F26]

A collection of practical exercises for acquiring a thorough familiarity with musical notation. By Prof. H. G. Tiepke. Volume 1. Includes musical notation in pencil in an unknown hand.

Practical method for the pianoforte / New York : G. Schirmer , 1893   [Box M2 F27]

By Louis Kohler. New edition revised by William Scharfenberg. Book 1.

Schirmer's library vol. 242 / New York : G. Schirmer , 1892   [Box M2 F28]

J. Concone. Fifty lessons for the medium part of the voice. Revised after the latest edition of Alberto Randegger by H. W. Nicholl.

Schirmer's library vol. 309 / New York : G. Schirmer , 1895   [Box M2 F29]

Cornelius Gurlitt. Album leaves for the young. Twenty little pieces for the pianoforte.

Schirmer's library vol. 530 / New York : G. Schirmer , 1898   [Box M2 F29]

Albert Biehl. The elements of piano playing.

The Science of the art of singing / New York : Breitkopf & Hartel , undated   [Box M2 F30]

By Anna Lankow. English translation by E. Buek. Combined with Practical Exercising Material, by Anna lankow and Manuel Garcia

Sunny days/ Philadelphia : Hatch Music Company , 1905   [Box M2 F30]

Nine Melodious and instructive piano pieces introducing the scales and strengthening the left hand. By W. Aletter.

Subseries IV.B.6. Piano and pianoforte , 1874-1915, undated

Aletter / Pittsburg : H. Kleber & Brother, Ltd. , 1894   [Box M3 F31]

Ten easy piano pieces. Edition Wood.

Alsatian dance / Boston : Oliver Ditson Company , 1892   [Box M3 F31]

By F. Thome. Revised by Leon Keach. The Young Player, selected piano pieces for the cultivation of a refined taste.

Carmencita / Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1901   [Box M3 F32]

By A. Cipollone, Op. 471. Edited by Preston Ware Orem. Pieces of Fancy, tone thoughts for the pianoforte.

Cheerfulness / Boston : Oliver Ditson Company , 1900   [Box M3 F32]

By A. Jul. Biedermann. Twelve pieces without octaves for the piano.

Curiosity / Boston : Oliver Ditson Company , 1900   [Box M3 F32]

By A. Jul. Biedermann. Twelve pieces without octaves for the piano.

Curious story / New York : G. Schirmer , 1882   [Box M3 F32]

By Stephen Heller. Revised and fingered by Wm. Schrafenberg.

The Duet hour / Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1898   [Box M3 F33]

A collection of piano duets of the easier grades of difficulty.

Fairy polka / New York : G. Schirmer , 1874   [Box M3 F34]

Sylphs easy dances for piano. By Fritz Spindler. OP. 93.

The Flower song / New York : The John Church Company , 1887   [Box M3 F34]

Francis Behr, OP. 575, no. 10. Revised and fingered by Geo. Schneider. Choice Selections from popular piano literature. Edited, revised, and fingered by eminent artists.

Gaiety / Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1900   [Box M3 F34]

By Carl Koelling, OP. 357. Scherzo. Compositions for the Piano.

Gitana (Spanish song) / New York : Arthur P. Schmidt , 1897   [Box M3 F34]

By Franz Behr. Compositions for the pianoforte.

Love's oracle / Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1899   [Box M3 F34]

By C. Bonm. Gleanings from popular composers for the piano.

Melody / New York : G. Schirmer , 1899   [Box M3 F34]

By F. R. Webb. Fruits and Flowers, eight little pieces for the piano. Op. 89. Design copyright 1899 by G. Schirmer, Edward b. Edwards DES.

Sartorio / Pittsburg : H. Kleber and Brother, Ltd. , 1896   [Box M3 F35]

Nine pictures of youth for the pianoforte, Op. 233. By Arnoldo Sartorio.

Song of the lark / New York : G. Schirmer , 1900   [Box M3 F35]

By P. Tschaikowsky. Elected works for the piano. Design copyright 1900 by G. Schirmer, Edward B. Edwards des Paris 1900

A Village holiday / New York : G. Schirmer , 1900   [Box M3 F35]

By O. Beringer. Edited and fingered by Louis Oesterle. "Andante and Allegro" A collection of pieces without octaves for the pianoforte, carefully fingered. Design Copyright 1897 by G. Schirmer, Edward B. Edwards, Des.

What they do in wonder town / Philadelphia : Theodore Presser Company , 1915   [Box M3 F36]

Picture play for the pianoforte by Ruth Alden.

Wild flowers / Philadelphia : Hatch Music Company , 1912   [Box M3 F36]

By Albert J. Rusby. Four piano sketches.

With cheerful heart / Boston : The B. F. Wood Music Company , undated   [Box M3 F36]

By Theodore Kullak. Youthful Days, 24 original pieces for the pianoforte.

Subseries IV.B.7. Fragments and portfolio , 1895, 1902, undated

Fragments , 1895, 1902, undated   [Box M3 F37]

Portfolio for sheet music , undated   [Box M3 F38]

The Inside cover of this empty portfolio bears for the stamped name "H.M. Duyckinck" and lists music with associated tempos.

Subgroup V. Rockwood Museum & collection related materials

Subgroup V. Rockwood Museum & collection related materials is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.   

Subgroup VI. Family genealogies

Subgroup VI. Family genealogies is currently in process. Please contact a manuscripts librarian for further assistance.