University of Delaware Library

Bauer, Charlotte Andrews, collector.

Henry Mills Alden letters collection

1860-1949

(bulk dates 1860-1908)


Descriptive Summary

Identification: MSS 636


Creator: Bauer, Charlotte Andrews, collector.


Title: Henry Mills Alden letters collection


Inclusive Dates: 1860-1949


Bulk Dates: 1860-1908


Extent: 45 items (1 box) and oversize removals


Abstract: American editor and author Henry Mills Alden (1836-1919) served as editor of Harper's Magazine for 50 years from 1869 to 1919. The collection consists of 45 items dating between 1860 and 1949, with the majority comprising letters to Alden from contemporary literary figures between 1860 and 1908.


Language: Materials entirely in English.



Citation

MSS 636, Henry Alden Mills letters collection, Special Collections, University of Delaware Library, Newark, Delaware.

Shelving Summary

Box 1: Shelved in SPEC MSS manuscript boxes

F28: Removed to SPEC MSS oversize boxes (18 inches)

Location

Special Collections Department, University of Delaware Library / Newark, Delaware 19717-5267 / Phone: 302-831-2229 / Fax: 302-831-6003 / URL: http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/

Source

Gift of Merry Jo Bauer and Jeffrey Andrews Bauer in memory of Charlotte Andrews Bauer, February 2011.

Processing

Processed and encoded by Julia Pompetti, April 2011.

Materials Available in Alternative Format

Preservation photocopies of the material in this collection are available at the end of Box 1 of the collection.


The collection is open for research.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Use of materials from this collection beyond the exceptions provided for in the Fair Use and Educational Use clauses of the U.S. Copyright Law may violate federal law. Permission to publish or reproduce is required from the copyright holder. Please contact Special Collections Department, University of Delaware Library, http://www.lib.udel.edu/cgi-bin/askspec.cgi


Biographical Note

American editor and author Henry Mills Alden (1836-1919) was editor for 50 years of Harper's Magazine from 1869 to 1919. A descendant of John and Priscilla Alden of Mayflower fame, Alden was born in Mount Tabor, Vermont, on 3 November 1836.

In 1853, he entered Williams College where his fellow students included James A. Garfield, John J. Ingalls, and Horace E. Scudder. He then attended Andover Theological Seminary with the intention of becoming a preacher; however, Alden changed course and pursued a literary career after two of his articles on the Eleusinian Mysteries were accepted for publication in the Atlantic Monthly. These essays had been submitted to the magazine without his knowledge by his friend, the American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Alden moved to New York City in 1861 and supported himself through teaching while he continued to submit articles to national periodicals. In 1862, Harper and Brothers commissioned Alden to write a guidebook to the Central Railroad of New Jersey. This relationship with Harper and Brothers led to Alden becoming an assistant editor of Harper's Weekly and in 1869 the editor of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, a position which he held until his death in 1919. In his role as editor of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, which changed its title to Harper's Monthly Magazine in 1900, Alden viewed the periodical as a democratizing tool that provided the public access to current literary talents, and he supported the emerging realism movement for this reason. During his tenure, Harper's Monthly Magazine became the highest circulating periodical in the United States.

In addition to the monthly essays that Alden wrote for Harper's Magazine, he published three books: God in His World (1890), A Study of Death (1895), and Magazine Writing and New Literature (1908). He also edited several volumes of American literature and short stories with American author and editor William Dean Howells. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Alden received the honorary degrees of Doctor of Literature and Doctor of Laws in 1890 and 1907, respectively, from his alma mater.

Alden married Susan Frye Foster in 1861, and the couple had four children. Susan Alden died in 1895, and Alden eventually remarried Virginia poet Ada Foster Murray. Henry Mills Alden passed away in 1919 at the age of 83.

Upon his death, Alden left the present collection of letters to his nephew John Alden, who was a poet and editor of the Brooklyn Eagle. John Alden bequeathed the letters to the daughter of his first cousin, T. Clifton Andrews, who was Charlotte Andrews (Bauer). Charlotte Andrews had been like a daughter to John Alden and his wife, Cynthia Westover, and according to family lore, the Aldens provided significant emotional support to Charlotte Andrews when she eloped and married Mr. Bauer against the wishes of her mother. Charlotte Andrews Bauer organized the letters and accompanying envelopes and clippings into two albums. Before her death in 1980, Charlotte Andrews Bauer passed the letters on to her son, Rollin G. Bauer, Jr. (died 2004), who in turn willed joint ownership of the letters to his wife Merry Jo Bauer and his brother Jeffrey Bauer.

Sources:

"Henry Mills Alden of Harper's Dies." The New York Times 8 October 1919.

Kenney, Robert C. "Alden, Henry Mills." American National Biography Online Oxford University Press, 2000. http://www.anb.org/articles/16/16-00023.html (accessed 18 April 2011)


Scope and Content Note

The Henry Mills Alden letters collection consists of 45 items including letters, photographs, and clippings dating between 1860 and 1949 with the majority of the material comprising letters to Alden from contemporary literary figures dating between 1860 and 1908. There are also two long letters written by Alden to his first wife, Susan Foster, during their courtship in 1860 and 1861, as well as several items relating to Charlotte Andrews Bauer and her family from the 1930s and 1940s, including letters requesting information about the history of the family and a letter and photograph from a trip Bauer took to John Alden's summer estate.

This collection documents Alden's participation in a New England literary circle of the mid- to late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as his personal reflections on that circle, his writing, philosophical questions, and religious matters. Items in the collection also contextualize the provenance of the letters within the family's history. The collection is arranged into three series: I. Letters to Henry Mills Alden and family; II. Letters from Henry Mills Alden to Susan Foster; and III. Other correspondents.

Series I. contains 32 letters dating from 1873 to 1908 from literary and intellectual contemporaries, the majority of which are addressed to Alden. Correspondents include the editors of the Atlantic Monthly; James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), who served from 1857 to 1861 and accepted Alden's first published essays; William Dean Howells (1837-1920), who served from 1871 to 1881; Thomas Bailey Aldrich (1836-1907), who served from 1881 to 1890; and Horace Elisha Scudder (1838-1902), who served from 1890 to 1898. Topics in the letters ranged from the business of articles submitted to Alden for Harper's Monthly Magazine to personal condolence letters to Alden on the death of his wife Susan Foster Alden in 1895. Several letters also commented on Alden's book God in His World: An Interpretation (1890). One highlight is a short letter from American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) requesting revisions to his poem "Kéramos," which was first published in Harper's Monthly Magazine. American author Henry James (1843-1916) wrote to Alden in 1908 to accept a request for a short essay for publication, which prompted James to discuss his writing process. There are also three letters addressed to Mrs. Susan Alden, two of which discussed literary topics. The first letter was from Margaret Elizabeth Munson Sangster (1838-1912), an editor at various times for Harper's Young People, Harper's Bazaar, and Ladies' Home Journal, who discussed her literary preferences. The second letter was from Scottish author William Sharp (1855-1905), a central figure of the Celtic Renaissance who also wrote under the pseudonym Fiona Macleod. Sharp invoked Celtic mythology throughout his letter to Mrs. Alden in which he wished her good health. Finally, there is a condolence letter addressed to Henry Mills Alden's daughter Annie Alden from Horace Elisha Scudder, who had been a friend of Alden's since they were both students at Williams College.

Series II. comprises two long letters John Alden wrote to Susan Foster in 1860 and 1861 during their courtship. In the letters, Alden discussed the sermons he was giving in local parishes as well as his literary pursuits. He planned his future career and discussed the intellectual merits of their impending marriage. Of particular interest are the insights into Alden's writing process and his opinions on religion and literary merit.

Series III. consists of four letters, four photographs, and some notes by Charlotte Andrews Bauer, all pertaining to her and her family, dating from 1933 to 1949. The items in the first grouping concern trips that Bauer and her father's sister, "Aunt Charlotte," took to visit John Alden's summer home, "a pleasant old farm" called Bushy Crest. The farm was so named in honor of Alden's deceased wife, Cynthia May Westover Alden (1862-1931), who was known as "Bushy." Included is a letter from John Alden to Aunt Charlotte Andrews, in which he looked forward to her visit and discussed family news, including Charlotte Andrews Bauer's recent marriage. Also included are several photographs of Charlotte Andrews Bauer and her new husband along with other family members at the farm and an autograph note by Bauer briefly describing the history of Bushy Crest. The second grouping comprises two letters dated 1942 from a lawyer, John D. Dwyer, seeking descendants of American free thinker and reformer Stephen Pearl Andrews (1812-1886) for the inheritance of property. The third grouping consists of two letters dated in 1949 from a researcher named Jean Burton, who was interested in writing a biography and was looking for materials on Stephen Pearl Andrews.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names
Alden, Henry Mills, 1836-1919.
Uniform Titles
Harper's monthly magazine.
Harper's new monthly magazine.
Topical Terms
Authors, American--19th century--Correspondence.
Editors, American--19th century--Correspondence.
Periodicals, American--19th century.
Form/Genre Terms
Correspondence.
Photographs.
Clippings.
Occupation
Authors.
Editors.
Personal Contributors
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1807-1882.
Lowell, James Russell, 1819-1891.
Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920.
James, Henry, 1843-1916.
Sangster, Margaret Elizabeth Munson, 1838-1912.
Sharp, William, 1855-1905.
Alden, John, collector.

Related Materials in this Repository

MSS 197 Henry Mills Alden papers


  • I. Letters to Henry Mills Alden and family
  • II. Letters from Henry Mills Alden to Susan Foster
  • III. Other correspondents

Detailed Contents List

Series I. Letters to Henry Mills Alden and family , 1873-1948

Series I. contains 32 letters dating from 1873 to 1908 from literary and intellectual contemporaries, the majority of which are addressed to Alden. Correspondents include the editors of the Atlantic Monthly James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), who served from 1857 to 1861 and accepted Alden's first published essays; William Dean Howells (1837-1920), who served from 1871 to 1881; Thomas Bailey Aldrich (1836-1907), who served from 1881 to 1890; and Horace Elisha Scudder (1838-1902), who served from 1890 to 1898. Topics in the letters range from the business of articles submitted to Alden for Harper's Monthly Magazine to personal condolence letters to Alden on the death of his wife Susan Foster Alden in 1895. Several letters also comment on Alden's book God in His World: An Interpretation (1890). One highlight is a short letter from American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) requesting revisions to his poem "Kéramos" first published in Harper's Monthly Magazine. American author Henry James (1843-1916) wrote to Alden in 1908 to accept a request for a short essay for publication which prompted James to discuss his writing process. There are also three letters addressed to Mrs. Susan Alden, two of which discuss literary topics. The first letter is from Margaret Elizabeth Munson Sangster (1838-1912), an editor at various times for Harper's Young People, Harper's Bazaar, and Ladies' Home Journal, who discussed her literary preferences. The second letter is from Scottish author and a central figure of the Celtic Renaissance William Sharp (1855-1905), who also wrote under the pseudonym Fiona Macleod. Sharp invoked Celtic mythology throughout his letter to Mrs. Alden in which he wished her good health. Finally, there is a condolence letter addressed to Henry Mills Alden's daughter Annie Alden from Horace Elisha Scudder who had been a friend of Alden's since they were both students at Williams College.

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey , 1895 May 24   [Box 1 F1]

1 p.

American author and editor Thomas Bailey Aldrich (1836-1907) published several books of poems and prose as well as being a frequent contributor to periodicals. He served as editor for Every Saturday from 1865 to 1874 and for Atlantic Monthly, after William Dean Howells resigned, from 1881 to 1890.

Autograph letter signed. Condolence letter on the death of Alden's first wife Susan Foster Alden to whom he was married from 1861-1895.

Bowker, R.R. (Richard Rogers) , 1895 June 16   [Box 1 F2]

1 p.

American editor and publisher R.R. Bowker (1848-1933) was involved in the book trade and library movements of his time, starting the Library Journal with Frederick Leypoldt and Melvil Dewey and the American Catalogue with Leypoldt. He also went to England from 1880 and 1882 to head the founding of a British edition of Harper's Monthly.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter to Annie Fields Alden, Henry Mills Alden daughter by first wife Susan Foster, on the death of her mother.

Curtis, George William , 1888   [Box 1 F3]

2 p.

American writer and editor George William Curtis (1824-1892) wrote the "Easy Chair" column for Harper's New Monthly Magazine from 1853 to 1892.

Davis, Richard Harding , [1895] May 11   [Box 1 F4]

4 p.

American journalist and author Richard Harding Davis (1864-1916) was a war correspondent as well as the author of romantic fiction. He also served as editor of Harper's Weekly in the early 1890s.

Autograph letter signed. Condolence letter for the death of Alden's wife Susan Foster. Also included by the collector are two clippings with a photo and caption of Harding and a brief biography.

Dobson, (Henry) Austin , 1890 June 7   [Box 1 F5]

1 p.

English poet Austin Dobson (1840-1921) was also a biographer and literary critic of eighteenth-century writers.

Autograph letter signed. Dobson thanked Alden for the copy of Alden's anonymously published book God in His World: An Interpretation (1890) and included a few cursory impressions.

Eliot, Charles William , 1875 October 1   [Box 1 F6]

3 p.

American educator Charles William Eliot (1834-1926) was president of Harvard from 1869 to 1909 and was an outspoken proponent of educational reform.

Autograph letter signed. Eliot declined the request to provide an article about "inter-collegiate contests in writing" for Harper's Magazine, but shared his opinion on them nonetheless.

Howells, William Dean , 1894-1897

American author William Dean Howells (1837-1920) was an American realist who wrote close to 200 books in his lifetime and was a frequent contributor to periodicals. He was editor of the Atlantic Monthly from 1871 to 1881. Alden and Howells edited several American short story collections together.

To Mrs. Alden , 1894 January 7   [Box 1 F7]

3 p.

Typed letter signed. A friendly letter from Howells to Mrs. Alden. He mentioned that she was out when he stopped by to visit. He goes on to discuss his own family and travels.

To H.M. Alden , 1895 May 12   [Box 1 F7]

3 p.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter on the death of Alden's first wife Susan Foster.

To H.M. Alden , 1897 August 1   [Box 1 F7]

4 p.

Autograph letter signed. Howell wrote of his work on a book.

Hutton, Laurence , 1895 June 1   [Box 1 F8]

1 p.

American author and editor Laurence Hutton (1843-1904) known particularly as a drama critic, he also served as literary editor of Harper's Magazine from 1886 to 1898.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter written by Hutton on the death of Alden's first wife Susan Foster.

Ingersoll, Ernest , 1897 May 14   [Box 1 F9]

2 p.

American naturalist and writer Ernest Ingersoll (1852-1946) traveled throughout the American West and published several books of his observations.

Autograph letter signed. Ingersoll thanked Alden for payment for his article on "nests and eggs" published in Harper's Monthly Magazine and remarked his pleasure at its reception. He also discussed his progress on a book of nature essays to be published by Macmillan Company.

James, Henry , 1908 November 20; 1948   [Box 1 F10]

2 p.

American author Henry James (1843-1916) is famous for his championing of the realist novel and his depiction of Americans abroad. James moved permanently to England in 1897.

Typed letter signed. Writing from Lamb House in England, James agreed to write a story for publication in Harper's Monthly Magazine and discussed his writing process. Also included by the collector is a clipping from an unidentified newspaper titled "Henry James' Niece Plans Lamb House Sale" from 1948.

Johnston, Richard Malcolm , 1895 May 30   [Box 1 F11]

3 p.

American lawyer, educator, and writer Richard Malcolm Johnston (1822-1898) published short stories with a regional focus on Georgia in many periodicals, including Harper's.

Autograph letter signed. Malcolm expressed his sympathy for Alden's loss of his first wife Susan Foster.

Lathrop, Rose Hawthorne , [1895] June 15   [Box 1 F12]

3 p.

American writer and founder of the Catholic order of the Servants of Relief for Incurable Cancer Rose Hawthorne Lathrop (1851-1926) was the daughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne and wrote poetry and short stories for periodicals before becoming a nun.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter to Alden on the death of his first wife and Lathrop's good friend Susan Foster. Lathrop wrote from Montreal, Canada.

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth , 1877 August 27   [Box 1 F13]

3 p.

American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was one of the Fireside Poets and is famous for his lyric style. One of his well-known poems "Kéramos" was published in Harper's New Monthly Magazine in December 1877 by Alden. Longfellow is also a descendent of the Mayflower's John and Priscilla Alden.

Autograph letter signed. Longfellow asked Alden to make some revisions to his poem "Kéramos" before publication.

Lowell, James Russell , 1890 July 22   [Box 1 F14]

2 p.

New England author, editor, and diplomat James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) was a poet, a political essayist sometimes writing under the pseudonym Hosea Bigelow, and editor of various magazines and was the first editor of The Atlantic Monthly, serving from 1857 to 1861 as well as a frequent contributor. As editor of The Atlantic Monthly, Lowell published Alden's first essays on the Eleusinian Mysteries which Harriet Beecher Stowe had submitted on his behalf.

Autograph letter signed. Lowell's letter discussed the publication of one of his poems as well as his reaction to Alden's book which he deems "refreshing and wholesome." Lowell was probably referring to Alden's book God in His World: An Interpretation (1890), which was published anonymously.

Matthews, Brander , 1908 November 12   [Box 1 F15]

3 p.

American playwright, author and literature professor Brander Matthews (1852-1929) was considered the foremost American drama critic by the 1890s and held a position at Columbia University.

Autograph letter signed. Matthews commented on Alden's book Magazine Writing and the New Literature (1908).

Pyle, Howard , 1895 May 12   [Box 1 F16]

2 p.

American artist and writer Howard Pyle (1853-1911) wrote and illustrated children's books. He was also a frequent illustrator for periodicals of his time including Harper's. He was also an illustrator for William Dean Howells books.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter for the death of Alden's wife Susan Foster.

Rives, Amelie , 1895 June 12   [Box 1 F17]

4 p.

American author Amelie Rives (1863-1945) was known for her progressive portrayal of women and marriage in her novels. As editor of the Atlantic Monthly, Thomas Bailey Aldrich published Rives's first piece in March 1886.

Autograph letter signed. A sympathy letter from Rives to Alden on the death of his first wife Susan Foster.

Roe, Edward Payson , 1881 July 11   [Box 1 F18]

2 p.

American author and minister (1837-1888) Edward Payson Roe's novels were known for their nondenominational religious themes and their concern for women's working conditions. Many of his novels were first published serially in periodicals.

Autograph letter signed. Roe apologized that his children's recent case of the mumps prevented a planned visit with the Alden family and promises to reschedule. The letter was addressed from his home at Cornwall-on-Hudson.

Sangster, Margaret Elizabeth Munson , 1879 August 14   [Box 1 F19]

2 p.

American editor, writer, and poet Margaret Elizabeth Sangster (1838-1912) served as editor on many periodicals, including Harper's Young People, Harper's Bazaar, and Ladies' Home Journal.

Autograph letter signed. To Mrs. Susan Foster Alden. Sangster wrote about what she was currently reading and enjoying.

Scudder, Horace Elisha , 1895 May 23   [Box 1 F20]

4 p.

American author and editor Horace Elisha Scudder (1838-1902) was a classmate of Alden's at Williams College and wrote popular children's books. Alden briefly lived with Scudder when he first moved to New York City in 1861 before his marriage to Foster. Scudder served editor of the Atlantic Monthly after Thomas Bailey Aldrich resigned, from 1890 to 1898 and was also an editor for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Autograph letter signed. Scudder wrote a condolence letter to Annie Fields Alden on the death of her mother. Annie was Alden's daughter with first wife Susan Foster.

Sharp, William , 1895

Scottish author William Sharp, pseudonym Fiona Macleod, (1855-1905) was a central figure in the Celtic Renaissance and frequently published his mythic stories in both British and American periodicals.

1895 April 17   [Box 1 F21]

2 p.

Autograph letter signed. Sharp wrote to wish Mrs. Alden good health and sent her a copy of some stories about St. Brigitte (not included).

1895 June 15   [Box 1 F21]

2 p.

Autograph letter signed. Condolence letter for the death of Susan Foster.

Stedman, Edmund Clarence , 1897 May 10   [Box 1 F22]

1 p.

American poet and stockbroker Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833-1908) also wrote and edited critical works on poetry including that of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. In 1904 he was one of the first members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters along with William Dean Howells.

Autograph letter signed. A brief letter in which Stedman asked Alden to confirm that he received a poem Stedman sent for publication.

Stoddard, Richard Henry , 1897 February 30   [Box 1 F23]

1 p.

American poet and editor Richard Henry Stoddard (1825-1903) along with his wife Elizabeth Drew Stoddard hosted a writer's salon at their home in New York whose attendees included Aldrich.

Autograph letter signed. Stoddard wrote to ask if Alden has received a poem Stoddard had sent. Letter mistakenly dated "February 30."

Trask, Kate Nichols , [1895]   [Box 1 F24]

5 p.

American philanthropist and author Kate Nichols Trask (1853-1922) wrote plays, poetry, and fiction. She was the wife of Spencer Trask who was one of the major contributors who kept the New York Times afloat and oversaw its restructuring in 1896. She created an endowment so that their Saratoga Springs, New York estate, Yaddo, could be used as an artist community.

Autograph letter signed. A condolence letter for the death of Alden's wife Susan Foster.

van Dyke, Henry , 1890 May 10   [Box 1 F25]

2 p.

American minister and poet, Henry van Dyke (1852-1933) was an important voice in religion and participated in contemporary debates on the practice of Christianity.

Autograph letter signed. Van Dyke thanked Alden for the copy of his book, possibly God in His World: An Interpretation, and expressed his praise for it.

Wallace, Lew , 1888 January 14   [Box 1 F26]

1 p.

American soldier and author Lew Wallace (1827-1905) is best known for his book Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ.

Autograph letter signed. Wallace requested a recommendation for an illustrator to provide 17 illustrations for an edition of his immensely popular book Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, first published in 1880.

Warner, Charles Dudley , 1892-1895

American author and editor Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was a contributing editor to Harper's New Monthly Magazine from 1884 to 1898 during which time Alden was also an editor. Warner coauthored the satirical novel The Gilded Age (1874) with Mark Twain.

1892 September 21   [Box 1 F27]

2 p.

Autograph letter signed. Warner asked Alden's opinion of a writer he was thinking of asking to do a "Life of" piece, possibly for the Biographical Dictionary and Synopsis of Books Ancient and Modern (1896). He also commented on Alden's book God in His World: An Interpretation (1890).

1895 June 1   [Box 1 F27]

3p.

Autograph letter signed. Condolence letter for Alden's first wife Susan Foster.

Whitman, Walt , 1873 November 4   [Box 1 F28] (Removed to SPEC MSS oversized boxes (18 inches))

1 p.

American poet Walt Whitman (1819-1892) is best known for his use of free verse, transcendentalist sensibilities, and realism.

Color photo reproduction of autograph letter signed in a frame. Whitman acknowledged payment for the publication of his poem "Song of the Redwood Tree" in Harper's Monthly Magazine.

Wister, Owen , undated   [Box 1 F29]

1 p.

American author Owen Wister (1860-1938) was famous for his fictional essays and books concerning life in the wild west. His pieces were often published in contemporary periodicals.

Autograph letter signed and dated "Thursday night." Wister discussed an essay by an unnamed author he gave to Alden for possible publication in "The Magazine."

Series II. Letters from H.M. Alden to Susan Foster , 1860-1861

Series II. comprises two long letters Alden wrote to Foster in 1860 and 1861 during their courtship. H.M. Alden and Susan Frye Foster were married from 1861 to her death in 1865. In the letters, Alden discussed the sermons he is giving in local parishes as well as his literary pursuits. He planned his future career and discussed the intellectual merits of their impending marriage. Of particular interest are the insights into Alden's writing process and his opinions on religion and literary merit.

To Susan Foster , 1860 [October] 29   [Box 1 F30]

8 p.

Autograph letter signed. Alden wrote to Susan Foster during their courtship. He outlined the sermon he was to give the following Sunday and discussed his desire to obtain a position at a small church in order for him to have time to pursue his intellectual interests. He also mentioned his work on the "Eleusinian papers," which would become his first published work appearing in the Atlantic Monthly.

To Susan Foster , 1861 March 24   [Box 1 F30]

4 p.

Autograph letter signed. Alden discussed his writing at length, the articles he on which he was working, and what he hoped to achieve with them. He also mentioned his friendship with Horace Scudder and his desire to live in New York. Alden discussed marriage on a philosophical level.

Series III. Other correspondents , 1933-1949

Series III. consists of four letters, four photographs, and some notes by Charlotte Andrews Bauer, all pertaining to her and her family, dating from 1933 to 1949. The items in the first grouping concern trips that Bauer and her father's sister, "Aunt Charlotte," took to visit John Alden's summer home, "a pleasant old farm" called Bushy Crest. The farm was so named in honor of Alden's deceased wife Cynthia May Westover Alden (1862-1931), who was known as "Bushy." Included is a letter from John Alden to (Aunt) Charlotte Andrews in which he looked forward to her visit and discussed family news including Charlotte Andrews Bauers' recent marriage. Also included are several photographs of Charlotte Andrews Bauer and her new husband at the farm along with other family members and an autograph note by Bauers briefly describing the history of Bushy Crest. The second grouping comprises two letters dated 1942 from a lawyer, John D. Dwyer, seeking descendants of American free thinker and reformer Stephen Pearl Andrews (1812-1886) for the inheritance of property. The third grouping consists of two letters dated in 1949 from a researcher named Jean Burton who was interested in writing a biography and looking for materials on Stephen Pearl Andrews.

From John Alden , 1933-1934, undated

To Charlotte Andrews from John Alden , 1933 September 30   [Box 1 F31]

2 p.

American poet and editor of the Brooklyn Eagle John Alden (1860-1934) was Henry Mills Alden's nephew. John Alden in turn left the letters to the daughter of his first cousin T. Clifton Andrews, who was Charlotte Andrews Bauer. Alden and his wife Cynthia "Bushy" Westover, for whom their estate, Bushy Crest, was named--as the stationery notes--had no children of their own and were very close to Charlotte Andrews Bauer.

Typed letter signed. John Alden provided directions to his summer home Bushy Crest and expressed surprise at "Charlotte" Jr.'s marriage to Bauer.

Envelope , undated   [Box 1 F31]

Envelope bears handwritten note about John Alden's acquisition of Bushy Crest from neighbors and that it returned to their ownership after his death.

Photographs , circa 1934   [Box 1 F31]

Four black and white photographs, presumably of Charlotte Andrews Bauer and her husband at Bushy Crest in 1934.

From John D. Dwyer , 1942   [Box 1 F32]

2 p.

Two typed letters signed addressed to Clifton Andrews, Charlotte Andrews Bauer's father. Both letters were attempts by lawyer John J. Dwyer to trace the descendants of Stephen Pearl Andrews concerning the inheritance of property.

From Jean Burton , 1949

Jean Burton indicated in her letters that she has published several biographies through Knopf and Farrar, Straus and is mentioned in Who's Who in America.

1949 August 9   [Box 1 F33]

1 p.

Typed letter signed. Burton wrote to Mrs. T. Clifton Andrews, Charlotte Andrews Bauer's mother, looking for archival material for a biography of American free-thinker and reformer Stephen Pearl Andrews (1812-1886). There is an autograph note by Charlotte Andrews Bauer indicating that she replied to the letter for her mother.

1949 August 22   [Box 1 F33]

1 p.

Typed letter signed. Burton acknowledged Bauer's response that the family did not have any of Stephen Pearl Andrews's papers.