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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. With forty-two illustrations by John Tenniel. New York: D. Appleton, 1866.

This is the second American issue of the first edition. John Tenniel's illustrations have been indelibly linked to most people's image of Alice, no matter how many other editions they see. Tenniel (1820-1914) illustrated many other books and was a political cartoonist for Punch magazine, where he worked from 1850 to 1901.


Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; with forty-two illustrations by John Tenniel. Mount Vernon, N. Y.: Press of A. Colish, 1983.

Abraham Colish (1882-1963), fine press printer and publisher, began his career as a composer for advertising copy and soon moved into publishing. The Press of A. Colish produced work for the Limited Editions Club, the Grolier Club, the Typophiles, Colophon, the Pforzheimer Library, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Special Collections holds the archives of The Press of A. Colish.


Through the Looking Glass

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Through the Looking Glass: and What Alice Found There; illustrated by Nicholas Parry. Market Drayton, England: Tern Press, 2001.

This edition is limited to ninety numbered copies signed by Nicholas and Mary Parry, the artists and printers. The Parrys used their granddaughter Isabel as the model for this modern Alice. The fifty lithographs are printed in shades of terracotta.


Alice's Adventures Robert Sabuda.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. A Pop-up Adaptation of Lewis Carroll's Original Tale. N. Y.: Little Simon, 2003.

Robert Sabuta breaks the physical bonds of the flat page with his pop-up books as the images literally burst out of the page. He is considered the contemporary master of paper engineering as each of his productions has become more complex and exciting.


Lewis Carroll's Through

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There. Illustrated by Ralph Steadman. London: MacGibbon & Kee, 1972.

Ralph Steadman is a writer, cartoonist, illustrator and printmaker. He is best-known for his New Yorker cartoons and for his collaboration with American writer Hunter S. Thompson on the book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Steadman emphasizes the satirical elements in Alice and adds a psychedelic, drug-induced atmosphere.


Alice in Wonderland

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Alice in Wonderland; illustrated with six coloured lithographs by Marie Laurencin. Paris: Black Sun Press, 1930.

Started in 1927 by Harry and Caresse Crosby, well-to-do young expatriates living in Paris, the Black Sun Press was created to publish its founders' poetry in beautifully bound, hand set books. Marie Laurencin's lithographs resemble children's crayon drawings and emphasize the gentle children's story without the dark undertones of many versions of Alice.


Lewis Carroll's Alice's

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-glass and What Alice Found There; illustrated with 95 wood engravings by Barry Moser; with a preface and notes by James R. Kincaid; text edited by Selywn Goodacre. West Hatfield, Mass.: Pennyroyal Press, 1982.

Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; illustrated by Barry Moser; preface and notes by James R. Kincaid; text edited by Selwyn H. Goodacre. West Hatfield, Mass.: Pennyroyal Press, 1982.

The Barry Moser version of the Alice story is definitely not for children, as he tells the story in a dark and somewhat menacing manner. In describing this work Moser wrote, "I have tried to keep the illustrations weird (yet reasonable), and grotesque (yet humorous), but I have not tried to make them pretty or graceful.


Alice's Adventures Lewis Carroll, 1832-1898.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; illustrated by DeLoss McGraw. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2001.

DeLoss McGraw's gouache illustrations are marked by bold, rich colors and a collage-style layout. His work suggests the influence of early 20th-century abstract, fantasy, and surrealist painters. Although the images retain a dreamlike unreality, they lack the underlying sinister quality found in many interpretations.


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