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Abraham Lincoln: A Bicentennial Celebration University of Delaware Library Special Collections Abraham Lincoln: A Bicentennial CelebrationAbraham Lincoln: A Bicentennial Celebration


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Civil War

New Orleans Plum
"The New Orleans Plum,"
Punch 42 (24 May 1862), p. 203.
Federal Phoenix
"The Federal Phoenix,"
Punch 44 (3 December 1864), p. 229.
What will he do with them?
"What will he do with them,"
Vanity Fair 6 (4 October, 1862), p.163.

Cartoons


"The New Orleans Plum," Punch 42 (24 May 1862), p. 203.

The Union seizure of New Orleans in May 1862 was a monumental victory for Lincoln. In addition to capturing the largest Confederate port and the center of the slave trade, Union troops also seized substantial sums of money. This is the only cartoon in Punch to celebrate a Union vi story and depicts Lincoln as Little Jack Horner with his "New Orleans plum."

"The Federal Phoenix, " Punch 44 (3 December 1864), p. 229.

Many of the caricatures of Lincoln printed in Punch were the work of the great English illustrator Sir John Tenniel, who is best remembered today for his illustrations in Alice in Wonderland. In "The Federal Phoenix" Tenniel’s depiction of a savage, arrogant Lincoln, reflects the angry mood in which the English Conservative leaders and a majority of their followers received the news of his re-election in 1864.

"What will he do with them," Vanity Fair 6 (4 October, 1862), p.163.

Vanity Fair’s cartoon, which depicts Lincoln carrying a basket of blackbirds, is a commentary on the lack of public support for Lincoln’s plan for compensated emancipation.

Thomas Worth, 1834-1917.

Untitled pen and ink sketch, ca. 1864.

This original cartoon by the American artist Thomas Worth depicts Abraham Lincoln kicking George McClellan and George H. Pendleton, his Democratic Presidential and Vice-Presidential opponents in the 1864 election, in which he and Andrew Johnson were victorious.

Matthew Somerville Morgan, 1839-1890.

The American war: cartoons, by Matt Morgan and other English artists. London: Chatto and Windus, 1874.

Matt Morgan was one of the most popular English cartoonists and his work appeared primarily in the London magazines Fun and Comic News. He did not hold Abraham Lincoln in high regard and his numerous caricatures of the American president reflect this view. In the cartoon depicted on the cover, "The Daring American Acrobat" (November 1862), Lincoln executes a traverse above a crouded room while the hostile sovereigns of Europe look on.



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Abraham Lincoln Military Commander-in-chief


Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Message: fellow-citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives. [Washington, D.C.: s.n., 1861].

In his annual address to Congress, President Lincoln outlines his rationale for going to war and gives a clear indication that he is the commander-in-chief of the Union military effort.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

The letters of President Lincoln on questions of national policy. New York: H.H. Lloyd & Co., 1863.

In this publication of official letters Lincoln wrote to various critics and supporters, he defends his military and political handling of the War. In particular, his letters to General McClellan, Commander of the Army of the Potomac, reveal his distinct disagreement with the latter’s plans.

Lincoln's treatment of Gen. Grant. [New York: s.n., 1864].

Following the Battle of Antietam, General George McClellan was relived of command of the Union Army and replaced by General Ulysses S. Grant. This pamphlet documents in detail Abraham Lincoln’s direct management of Union military operations and his disappointment with the effectiveness of McClellan which led to his legendary comment: "If General McClellan does not want to use the army, I would like to borrow it for a time."

W. J. (William Jewett) Tenney,

The military and naval history of the rebellion in the United States: with biographical sketches of deceased officers. New York: D. Appleton & Co. 1866.

In this exhaustive early military history of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln’s hands-on role as chief Union military strategist is extensively documented. This illustration depicts the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox.

"Review of Federal Troops on the 4th of July by President Lincoln and General Scott," The Illustrated London News, No. 1101 (3 August 1861), p. 111.

The Garibaldi Guard was the nickname of the 39th New York Infantry, a regiment of largely Italian-Americans recruited mostly from New York City. Most of the members of this regiment were men who had fought under Giuseppe Garibaldi, the Italian freedom fighter; they wore a distinctively styled red shirt as part of their uniform to show their connection to their countryman, whose partisans had worn such a shirt in Italy.



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Autograph Documents


Note on David Miller
Abraham Lincoln. Autograph manuscript signed, 1p.,
Clinton, Ill., 15 October 1855. (detail)

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Autograph manuscript signed, 1p., Clinton, Ill., 15 October 1855.

Note in Lincoln’s hand on David Miller of Sangamon, Illinois

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Document signed, 1p., Washington, D.C., 27 February 1863.

Appointment of Thomas W. Sweney to serve as Assessor of Internal Revenue for the Second Collection District of Pennsylvania. Co-signed by Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Document signed, 1p., Washington, D.C., 4 March 1863.

Appointment of Thomas J. Emerson to serve as Collector of Internal Revenue for the First Collection District of Wisconsin. Co-signed by Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase.

Pass releasing of unknown boy
Abraham Lincoln. Autograph document signed, 1p.,
28 May 1864.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Document signed, 1p., Washington, D.C., 14 January 1864.

Presidential warrant to pardon J. B. Evans.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Document signed, 1p., Washington, D.C., 25 April 1864.

Presidential warrant approving a supplementary treaty with the Chippewa Indians.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Autograph document signed, 1p., 28 May 1864.

This pass authorizes the release of an unknown boy.

John Ehler pass
Abraham Lincoln. Autograph document signed, 1p.,
13 September 1864.

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Autograph document signed, 1p., 13 September 1864.

Pass for John Ehler to travel to City Point, Virginia.

"Let this boy, John Ehler, have transportation, food, and whatever is necessary, to get him to his Uncle Dr. Ehler, at Cavalry Corps Hospital at City Point, Va. Sep. 13, 1864. A. Lincoln"

Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1865.

Document signed, 1p., Washington, D.C., 30 September 1864.

Presidential appointment of Friedrich Kuhne to serve as Consul of the Grand Duchy for Mecklenburg-Strelitz, at New York. Co-signed by Secretary of State William H. Seward.



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Poet and President

Walt Whitman, the most important American poet of the nineteenth century, felt a great personal affinity with Abraham Lincoln. He saw Lincoln as the personification of the frontier qualities that he most admired in Americans. He was moved by Lincoln’s steadfast support for the Union during the horrors of the Civil War, writing, "Lincoln is particularly my man — particularly belongs to me; yes, and by the same token, I am Lincoln’s man: I guess I particularly belong to him; we are afloat on the same stream — we are rooted in the same ground."

When Lincoln died, Whitman wrote two poems dedicated to him, "Oh Captain! My Captain" and "When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d," as an expression of his and the country’s deep sorrow. Throughout the rest of his life, Whitman continued to write about Lincoln.

Walt Whitman, 1819-1892.

The Wound Dresser: A Series of Letters Written from the Hospitals in Washington during the War of the Rebellion. Boston: Small, Maynard, 1898.

Whitman’s brother was wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia and Whitman traveled to visit him. He was so moved by the condition of the troops that he moved to Washington and began to work as an aide in hospitals.

Whitman's Drum-taps
Walt Whitman's Drum-taps.
New York: Published by the author., 1865.

Walt Whitman, 1819-1892.

Memoranda During the War. Camden, N.J., 1875-76.

Whitman wrote a series of newspaper pieces on the war. He reworked the columns and his notes to produce this book.

Walt Whitman, 1819-1892.

Memories of President Lincoln: and Other Lyrics of the War. Portland, Me.: Mosher, 1906.

Walt Whitman, 1819-1892.

Wrenching Times: Poems from Drum-taps; wood engravings by Gaylord Schanilec. Newtown, Powys, Wales: Gwasg Gregynog, 1991.

Walt Whitman, 1819-1892.

Walt Whitman's Drum-taps. New York: Published by the author., 1865.

By the time Whitman's Drum-Taps was published in May 1865, the Civil War had ended and Lincoln was dead. Whitman quickly prepared a booklet of eighteen poems, including his two famous Lincoln laments, which were never issued as a separate volume. Instead, he bound it in with this second issue of Drum-Taps. The second edition includes "When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom'd," Whitman's great elegy on universal death and national healing. However, it was the more traditional, rhymed dirge, "O Captain, My Captain," that the public loved.



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